Vicodin Addiction

Vicodin Addiction

Vicodin Addiction

According to the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, more than 23 million adults and children over the age of 12 had taken some form of hydrocodone at least once in their lifetime for nonmedical purposes.

Doctors will very often prescribe Vicodin to patient for the relief of moderate to severe pain. Vicodin is a combo of hydrocodone (an opiate) and acetaminophen (the stuff that is in your Tylenol). Vicodin works by blocking the pain receptors in the brain, but it also creates a sense of euphoria in its users. This makes Vicodin work really well for pain but it also makes it super addictive. Who doesn’t want to feel good? That is what euphoria is. Unfortunately that is the thought that many people with a Vicodin addiction have.

People who take Vicodin will usually feel a rush of euphoria and relaxation. Not only that but any physical pain they are feeling begins to diminish. Over time, people who use Vicodin develop a tolerance for it. What is a tolerance? A tolerance means they need more and more Vicodin to achieve the same euphoria and pain relief as before. Many people with a Vicodin addiction can take anywhere from 20 to 30 pills a day and sometimes more. When someone with a Vicodin addiction begins taking that many pills they usually will start to show signs of Vicodin addiction. Here are some signs and symptoms of Vicodin addiction:

  • Drowsiness
  • An obsession with using and getting Vicodin
  • An inability to focus
  • Extreme anxiety and paranoia
  • Severe mood swings
  • Nausea and vomiting

Those with a Vicodin addiction usually will start “doctor shopping” or using manipulation, fraud and lies to get more and more of it. Because of the obsession with Vicodin all of their normal responsibilities in life become second to getting more Vicodin and their professional, personal and financial situations begin to fall apart. These are just a few of the effects of a Vicodin addiction though; there are so many other negative consequences to a Vicodin addiction. For instance some effects of Vicodin use are:

  • Itching
  • Swelling
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Vomiting and upset stomach

Vicodin use and Vicodin addiction can cause some medical issues if used for a long period of time. For instance, long term Vicodin use can cause liver damage, liver failure, jaundice, and urinary system issues. Also, because Vicodin is a central nervous system depressant it naturally decreases heart rate and breathing rate. This is especially true if taken in large doses by those with a Vicodin addiction. Those with a Vicodin addiction are at a high risk of overdose. Overdose occurs when someone takes a dose of Vicodin that is too much for them or if they mix Vicodin with another type of central nervous system depressant such as alcohol, other opiates, benzodiazepines, or barbiturates.

Another one of the problems with Vicodin addiction other than the effects and the risk of overdose are the withdrawal symptoms should the person with the Vicodin addiction every try to stop taking them. Withdrawal symptoms from a Vicodin addiction can be very unpleasant and most likely will require an inpatient or outpatient detox to help make more comfortable. Luckily though there is treatment for Vicodin addiction in the form of Vicodin detox and Vicodin drug treatment. For those that finally want to beat their Vicodin addiction they can seek help from a facility that specialize in getting people off their medicine once and for all.

Vicodin Addiction

According to the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, more than 23 million adults and children over the age of 12 had taken some form of hydrocodone at least once in their lifetime for nonmedical purposes.

Doctors will very often prescribe Vicodin to patient for the relief of moderate to severe pain. Vicodin is a combo of hydrocodone (an opiate) and acetaminophen (the stuff that is in your Tylenol). Vicodin works by blocking the pain receptors in the brain, but it also creates a sense of euphoria in its users. This makes Vicodin work really well for pain but it also makes it super addictive. Who doesn’t want to feel good? That is what euphoria is. Unfortunately that is the thought that many people with a Vicodin addiction have.

People who take Vicodin will usually feel a rush of euphoria and relaxation. Not only that but any physical pain they are feeling begins to diminish. Over time, people who use Vicodin develop a tolerance for it. What is a tolerance? A tolerance means they need more and more Vicodin to achieve the same euphoria and pain relief as before. Many people with a Vicodin addiction can take anywhere from 20 to 30 pills a day and sometimes more. When someone with a Vicodin addiction begins taking that many pills they usually will start to show signs of Vicodin addiction. Here are some signs and symptoms of Vicodin addiction:

  • Drowsiness
  • An obsession with using and getting Vicodin
  • An inability to focus
  • Extreme anxiety and paranoia
  • Severe mood swings
  • Nausea and vomiting

Those with a Vicodin addiction usually will start “doctor shopping” or using manipulation, fraud and lies to get more and more of it. Because of the obsession with Vicodin all of their normal responsibilities in life become second to getting more Vicodin and their professional, personal and financial situations begin to fall apart. These are just a few of the effects of a Vicodin addiction though; there are so many other negative consequences to a Vicodin addiction. For instance some effects of Vicodin use are:

  • Itching
  • Swelling
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Vomiting and upset stomach

Vicodin use and Vicodin addiction can cause some medical issues if used for a long period of time. For instance, long term Vicodin use can cause liver damage, liver failure, jaundice, and urinary system issues. Also, because Vicodin is a central nervous system depressant it naturally decreases heart rate and breathing rate. This is especially true if taken in large doses by those with a Vicodin addiction. Those with a Vicodin addiction are at a high risk of overdose. Overdose occurs when someone takes a dose of Vicodin that is too much for them or if they mix Vicodin with another type of central nervous system depressant such as alcohol, other opiates, benzodiazepines, or barbiturates.

Another one of the problems with Vicodin addiction other than the effects and the risk of overdose are the withdrawal symptoms should the person with the Vicodin addiction every try to stop taking them. Withdrawal symptoms from a Vicodin addiction can be very unpleasant and most likely will require an inpatient or outpatient detox to help make more comfortable. Luckily though there is treatment for Vicodin addiction in the form of Vicodin detox and Vicodin drug treatment. For those that finally want to beat their Vicodin addiction they can seek help from a facility that specialize in getting people off their medicine once and for all.

Source: http://addiction.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Signs_of_Vicodin_Addiction