Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Roxys, slang for Roxicodone – a brand name for the generic oxycodone, is basically heroin in a pill form. It is an opioid, narcotic painkiller that is highly addictive. Roxys can be swallowed, smoked, crushed and snorted, or mixed with water and injected – all just like heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Social Acceptance

What makes roxys worse than heroin, in a way, is their social acceptance. Roxicodone and Roxicet are legal by prescription whereas heroin is a known illicit “street drug.” People who are prescribed roxys by their doctors are more likely to follow doctors’ orders without asking questions about the drug they are being given. Roxicodone is a powerfully potent narcotic that has the same incidence of addictiveness as heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Accessibility

Roxy is arguably worse than heroin because it is a lot more accessible than heroin. Whereas heroin is only available on the street, roxys can be found in many home medicine cabinets. More and more high school students and college students are taking painkillers like roxycodone because their parents or their friends’ parents leave their prescription bottles lying around. Also, people who they themselves have been prescribed roxys due to a legitimate condition with pain become hooked and can simply get their doctors to keep prescribing the painkillers. And, roxys like heroin can be bought “on the street,” too.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Physical Dependence

Roxys come in 15, 20, and 30 mg and it is said that a 30mg pill of Roxicodone or Roxicet is the equivalent to one bag of heroin but that is not a trusted way to compare the two, since heroin potency can vary from bag to bag and batch to batch.

The withdrawal from roxys and heroin can range from mild to severe, depending on how much and how long you have been taking either drug. Withdrawal symptoms usually begin six to 30 hours after last use and can be compared to flu-like in nature. People who are physically dependent on roxys or heroin will experience agitation, anxiety, muscle aches, watery eyes, insomnia, runny nose, sweating, and constant yawning when they suddenly stop using, or go cold turkey. Also, restless legs (and arms, neck, hands, and feet) also called “the jimmies,” anxiety, and depression are all part and parcel of opiate withdrawal. These symptoms are virtually the same for both roxy users and heroin users.

Some people say withdrawal from roxies is worse than heroin and other say that heroin withdrawal is worse. It really depends on the individual, how much they have been using, for how long, and the number of times they have gone cold turkey. Because, every time you “kick” is like a shock to the system and so each time gets worse and worse.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Overdose

Both heroin and roxys are a central nervous system depressant which means that, if you take too much, your breathing can be slowed to a halt. This is when overdose occurs. Many times, people simply fall asleep and stop breathing when they have taken too much of either drug. Heroin may be slightly worse than roxys in this capacity because its potency is never exactly known whereas, a 30mg roxy pill is always 30mg. But, people abusing roxys and heroin have the same tendency to overdo it, leading to tragic repercussions.

So, Are Roxys Worse than Heroin?

Basically, these drugs are one in the same and are both extremely potent and addictive. Because of their social acceptance and accessibility, it can be argued that roxys are worse than heroin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.drugsense.org/

http://alcoholism.about.com/

What are Roxy pills?

roxy pills

A Roxy pill, or Roxicodone, is a brand name for the generic drug, Oxycodone. It is a narcotic painkiller. Roxicodone pills are also called Roxy pills, Roxy’s, Roxies (or any variation of spelling), blueberries, blues, 30s (for the 30 milligram strength).

Roxy pills are currently among the most abused drugs. Statistics show that Roxy pills and other narcotics like it are mostly abused by people ranging from 16 to 49 years old with some as young as 12 years old having at least tried one of these painkillers in a recreational way. Painkillers like Roxy pills are becoming the first go-to drug for recreational use, being “experimented with” even before marijuana and cocaine.

Roxy pills are pure opioid (synthetically produced opiate), meaning they do not contain aspirin or Tylenol like other narcotics of the same drug classification. Roxy pills are a Schedule II drug. Other drugs in this class include Methadone, Oxycodone (Percocet), Hydrocodone (Vicodin) and many, many others. There are a few different pills that are narcotic pain killers in pill form. There is Roxicet, also called Tylox, Roxanol (also called Morphine), Roxicodone (Percocet without the Tylenol). Anyone of these narcotic pain killers are strong, require a prescription, and could be called “Roxie.” These drugs are prescribed for moderate to severe pain.

Side effects while taking Roxy pills include respiratory depression, meaning breathing is slowed or may even stop if overdose occurs; hypotension, or low blood pressure; sweating; anxiety; sleepiness; itchiness; urinary difficulty/urinary tract infection; physical dependence; loss of appetite; dizziness; dry mouth; headaches and migraines.

And because of their potency, many people abuse Roxy pills for the euphoric “high” they experience. The ways in which Roxy pills are abused include being eaten (slang for swallowed), snorted/sniffed, smoked (as in free-based), slammed/banged/shot (slang terms for injected).

Signs of use and abuse of Roxy pills include “doctor shopping” and having multiple prescriptions; raiding medicine cabinets, medications going missing; always out of money; irritability; “pinned” pupils; agitated or restless behaviors; secretive behaviors such as hiding medications, isolation, and withdrawal from social activities; extreme and/or rapid weight loss.

Signs and outcome of overdose of Roxy pills include seizures, slowed or cessation of breath, hospitalization, coma, and death.

Those who take Roxy pills long term and suddenly stop will more than likely experience opioid abstinence syndrome, or simply “(the) withdrawals:” extreme flu-like symptoms such as sweats/night sweats, chills, diarrhea, vomiting, and body aches. In addition, people going through withdrawals from Roxy pills experience runny nose, sneezing, yawning, goose bumps, insomnia, restless limbs (aka “the
jerks,” “the jimmies”), and lethargy. As if these were not bad enough, withdrawal from Roxy pills also involves psychological symptoms including (increased) anxiety and depression, irritability, mood swings, and an overall extreme lack of will to do anything, including self-care like brushing your teeth and showering. Basically hell on earth. I always knew that the dreaded withdrawal onslaught from Roxy pills was coming when I’d wake up with what I called “dewy eyes” – during the night, my night sweats would have begun and that sweat would then pool in the corners of my eyes. When I awoke in this way, it only took a few minutes for the full-on effect of the withdrawals to begin. Worst.feeling.ever.

Sources:

www.detoxanswers.com

www.wiki.answers.com

www.wikipedia.org

www.nih.gov

www.prescriptiondrugabuse.org