Signs of Roxy Addiction

Signs of Roxy Addiction

Signs of Roxy Addiction

There may come a point where you wonder if you or someone you love is addicted to roxies. “Roxy” is the street name for the drug oxycodone, which is a prescription narcotic painkiller. It is classified as an opiate, like heroin or morphine.

Signs of Roxy Addiction: You

If you have been taking roxies and are wondering if you may be addicted, here are some signs of roxy addiction:

  • Constantly thinking about roxies
  • Obtaining multiple prescriptions for oxycodone
  • Feeling pain when the drug is not available
  • Flu-like symptoms when you try to stop using roxies
  • Restless thoughts or behaviors
  • Lying or stealing to obtain more roxies
  • Using roxies in secret
  • Hiding roxies around the house

Signs of Roxy Addiction: Loved one

If you suspect a friend or family member is addicted to roxies, there are some signs of roxy addiction you can look out to. The physical signs are usually specific to the class of drugs. Someone who is taking roxies or using heroin, for example, will act differently than someone who is abusing cocaine or amphetamines. However, behavioral signs of addiction are similar no matter what drugs are abused.

Signs of Roxy Addiction: Loved one: Physical

  • Pinpoint pupils: Roxy use makes the pupils constrict unnaturally. Normally the pupil dilates or constricts depending on the light in the room. When a person is on roxies, their pupil stays small no matter what. Likewise, when a person is withdrawing from roxies, their pupil will dilate unnaturally.
  • Unsteady gait
  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Nodding out: Nodding refers to people on opiates when they are in a state between sleep and waking. They may close their eyes and their head may droop while having a conversation or standing. They may catch themselves and wake up at this point or lose consciousness completely.
  • Sudden weight loss
  • Slurred words
  • Constipation
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting
  • Sweating
  • Withdrawal: If a person is unable to get his (or her) usual dose of oxycodone, they will begin to suffer from withdrawal symptoms. He will be restless, agitated and sweaty. He’ll suffer from muscle and bone pain, depression, diarrhea, chills, insomnia, vomiting and nausea.
  • Track marks: Some roxy abusers crush up the pills and inject them. Track marks may look like cat scratches that never seem to go away and grow within a short period of time.

Signs of Roxy Addiction: Loved one: Behavioral

  • Lying about roxy use
  • Using roxies without a prescription
  • Using roxies in other than pill form: Some people are prescribed to roxies for legitimate pain. If they take them exactly as prescribed and in the correct dose, they may not become addicted. However, even a legitimate prescription can lead to addiction if the person takes more than they are supposed to, for a longer period of time, and begins crushing the pills to snort if, inject it, or swallow the powder.
  • Stealing money, medication, or other items of value
  • Sudden mood swings
  • Visiting multiple doctors for the same problem
  • Isolating
  • Losing interest in things they used to enjoy
  • Hanging out with people who use roxies
  • Missing work or school
  • Unexplained financial or legal problems
  • Compulsive behavior
  • Drug craving
  • Depression

Does Snorting Roxies Give You Abscess?

Does Snorting Roxies Give You Abscess?

Roxy is the street name of the drug oxycodone. It is derived from the brand name of the medication-Roxicodone. These pills are also known as blues, blueberries, or 30’s. They come in doses of 15 or 30 mg and are pure oxycodone, unlike drugs like Percocet, which are oxycodone combined with acetaminophen.

Roxies are powerful prescription painkillers. They are in the same class of drugs as heroin and have similar effects. It is used in medical settings to treat moderate to severe pain. Roxies work by binding to opioid receptors in the brain. They bind to the same receptors that our bodies’ natural painkillers bind to. This produces the feeling of euphoria often experienced by roxy users. This is the main reason these drugs are used illicitly. Snorting roxies brings on effects quicker and more intensely and is not medically recommended. After prolonged roxy use, the body stops producing natural painkillers, resulting in opiate dependency.

Roxies can be smoked, swallowed, snorted, or injected. A person would snort a roxy if they were looking for a quicker and more powerful effect than just swallowing them. Snorting roxies causes a quicker onset of effects, causing almost immediate pain relief and euphoric effects. However, when you are snorting roxies instead of swallowing them, you increase your risk of dangerous side effects and overdose.

Snorting roxies won’t give you abscesses like injection would, but you do run the risk of damage to your nose. The nose is lined with delicate mucous membranes. When you are snorting roxies, you run the risk of damaging these membranes, and you can cause the blood vessels in the nose to rupture. Over time, snorting roxies can continue to eat away at your inner nose and can cause permanent damage.

Snorting roxies causes large amount of oxycodone to enter the bloodstream all at once. When you take roxies orally the dose is much more controlled. The kind of immediate action of oxycodone in the bloodstream caused by snorting roxies is dangerous because snorting it causes the drug to be absorbed in higher amounts than normal. The side effects of roxies, like suppression of breathing, are much more extreme, and you can actually stop breathing and die after snorting roxies.

The other danger of snorting roxies is that you run a higher risk of dependence and addiction. Studies show that the method of administration of the drug determines the risk of addiction. When you take roxies orally, the “high” lasts a longer time and is less intense. The amount in the blood stream reaches a moderate concentration and then slowly dissipates. Snorting roxies causes a spike in the blood concentration, which then drops off very quickly; leaving the body wanting more, this is known as “craving.” The more intense the craving then the higher the addictive potential will be.

Finally, snorting roxies can put you at risk for transmission of disease if you share your snorting instrument with other people. Hepatitis C and a number of other diseases can be transmitted in this manner.

Roxy Withdrawal Length

Under prescribed dosage, roxys are an effective pain reliever, but when crushed and snorted or injected, the drug produces a quick and powerful “high” that some abusers compare to the feeling they get when doing heroin. Because roxy, like heroin and other opioids, is a central nervous system depressant and overdose can cause respiratory failure and death. Some symptoms of a roxy overdose include:

Usually if an individual is experiencing roxy overdose symptoms or taking them not as prescribed they are and have become addicted to roxys. The addiction of prescription pills has become a deadly epidemic worldwide. Roxycotin is a well-known narcotic pain killer. It is often referred to on the streets as roxy, roxies, blues, dum dums, blueberries, and smurfs. The active ingredient oxycodone in roxycontin is what makes this pain killer a highly addictive drug. Oxycodone is an opium derivative which causes addiction in the body and the brain. After excessive use of this drug or roxy use, your body stops producing the proper chemicals in your brain (dopamine & serotonin) because it relies on the roxy use for the chemical. With proper detoxification, it can take a recovering addict up to 3 years for the brain to start producing the proper levels of dopamine and serotonin for the body to feel normal again.

When going through a roxy withdrawal during, addicts may experience symptoms such as feelings of restlessness, vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, weakness, chills, sweating, depression, and increased heart rate, and craving roxys. If you have a problem with an addiction to Roxicodone  and think you may be addicted, you should get help as soon as possible because they can advise you how to stop using roxy’s. Although this drug is prescribed by doctors, it is a serious substance that can destroy your life and your health.

Roxy withdrawal symptoms can include more of but are not limited to:

Roxy withdrawal symptoms can begin as soon as six hours after the last dose and roxy withdrawal length can last up to one week. People who have gone through roxy withdrawal compare the process to the intensity of heroin withdrawal. Roxy withdrawal length is short when looked at how long it takes for the substance to leave your body but it takes a long time before you brain is producing the right chemicals and is back to normal after a long period of roxy use. This normalcy in the brain can take years to be reestablished. Roxy withdrawal length also just depends on the user and how much roxy they were using.