Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Roxys, slang for Roxicodone – a brand name for the generic oxycodone, is basically heroin in a pill form. It is an opioid, narcotic painkiller that is highly addictive. Roxys can be swallowed, smoked, crushed and snorted, or mixed with water and injected – all just like heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Social Acceptance

What makes roxys worse than heroin, in a way, is their social acceptance. Roxicodone and Roxicet are legal by prescription whereas heroin is a known illicit “street drug.” People who are prescribed roxys by their doctors are more likely to follow doctors’ orders without asking questions about the drug they are being given. Roxicodone is a powerfully potent narcotic that has the same incidence of addictiveness as heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Accessibility

Roxy is arguably worse than heroin because it is a lot more accessible than heroin. Whereas heroin is only available on the street, roxys can be found in many home medicine cabinets. More and more high school students and college students are taking painkillers like roxycodone because their parents or their friends’ parents leave their prescription bottles lying around. Also, people who they themselves have been prescribed roxys due to a legitimate condition with pain become hooked and can simply get their doctors to keep prescribing the painkillers. And, roxys like heroin can be bought “on the street,” too.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Physical Dependence

Roxys come in 15, 20, and 30 mg and it is said that a 30mg pill of Roxicodone or Roxicet is the equivalent to one bag of heroin but that is not a trusted way to compare the two, since heroin potency can vary from bag to bag and batch to batch.

The withdrawal from roxys and heroin can range from mild to severe, depending on how much and how long you have been taking either drug. Withdrawal symptoms usually begin six to 30 hours after last use and can be compared to flu-like in nature. People who are physically dependent on roxys or heroin will experience agitation, anxiety, muscle aches, watery eyes, insomnia, runny nose, sweating, and constant yawning when they suddenly stop using, or go cold turkey. Also, restless legs (and arms, neck, hands, and feet) also called “the jimmies,” anxiety, and depression are all part and parcel of opiate withdrawal. These symptoms are virtually the same for both roxy users and heroin users.

Some people say withdrawal from roxies is worse than heroin and other say that heroin withdrawal is worse. It really depends on the individual, how much they have been using, for how long, and the number of times they have gone cold turkey. Because, every time you “kick” is like a shock to the system and so each time gets worse and worse.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Overdose

Both heroin and roxys are a central nervous system depressant which means that, if you take too much, your breathing can be slowed to a halt. This is when overdose occurs. Many times, people simply fall asleep and stop breathing when they have taken too much of either drug. Heroin may be slightly worse than roxys in this capacity because its potency is never exactly known whereas, a 30mg roxy pill is always 30mg. But, people abusing roxys and heroin have the same tendency to overdo it, leading to tragic repercussions.

So, Are Roxys Worse than Heroin?

Basically, these drugs are one in the same and are both extremely potent and addictive. Because of their social acceptance and accessibility, it can be argued that roxys are worse than heroin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.drugsense.org/

http://alcoholism.about.com/

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

First of all, good luck. If you have never experienced opiate withdrawal symptoms, also called being dope sick, you are lucky. If you have, then you know what hell on earth feels like. And, if you have gone through opiate withdrawals more than once, you probably also have noticed that they get worse every subsequent time you stop or run out of your supply. This is because your body is going through a kind of shock: your brain has been altered by taking opiates (such as Oxycodone, Roxicet, heroin, etc.) and without these substances, your brain and therefore body go into panic mode.

Often times compared to being flu-like symptoms, opiate withdrawals are intense, acute, and although not life-threatening, it sure feels like you’re dying.

While going through opiate withdrawal, you may experience some or all of the following:

  • Agitation and anxiety
  • Depression
  • Muscle aches
  • Watery Eyes
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Runny nose
  • Restlessness
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Dilated pupils
  • Chills and goose bumps

Here are 10 things you can do to survive opiate withdrawal:

1. Prepare a comfortable environment:

Keep your tablet or TV and DVD player nearby so that you can watch some lighthearted movies.

Make sure that your room is at a comfortable temperature, and make sure that you have some soft blankets and maybe a fan. Prepare to change your sheets often because of sweating.

Wear loose and comfortable clothing. Again, you’ll probably have to change clothes a lot because of the sweating.

2. Avoid going through opiate withdrawal alone. If you don’t plan to check yourself into a rehab facility, then stay with someone who can support you during the withdrawal period.

3. Take some time off from your usual activities. Opiate withdrawal may take up to 2 weeks, so try to take some time off of work. If you have a family, then check yourself into a rehab facility or go somewhere where your children won’t have to see you going through opiate withdrawals.

4. Slowly taper off your narcotics. Reduce your doses of opioids or medications by about 20 to 25 percent every 2 or 3 days to minimize opiate withdrawals.

5. Try community detox. Check out your local methadone clinic so that you can gradually wean yourself off of narcotics by taking gradually decreasing doses of methadone. Community detox will allow you to go on with your daily life without checking in to an in-patient facility.

6. Go to a psychiatric ward or other inpatient psychiatric facility if you’ve had episodes of suicidal thoughts or hurting yourself in the past. Opiate withdrawal can bring out these negative behaviors, which could put you in real danger. If you have a history of depression or other psychiatric problems, then do your detox under medical supervision.

7. Check yourself into a rehabilitation facility.

Also called inpatient therapy, you will receive individual and group therapy and support. While you stay in a rehabilitation facility, you can talk to counselors about your addiction or you can spend time in support groups with other addicts.

8. Give yourself a lot of positive reinforcement. Try some of these strategies:

Tell yourself that your withdrawal pains from opiates are like labor pains. You’re giving birth to a new you.

Write a notice to yourself that says, “I’m a fantastic person, and I’m doing something amazing.” Post the notice where you can see it.

Give yourself a non-drug reward for every day that you make it through opiate withdrawal.

9. Remember to eat food and drink water. You may not feel like eating or drinking fluids, but your body needs nourishment and hydration. Eat saltines or yogurt or other foods that are easy on your stomach. Also, be sure to drink water or fruit juice to replace any fluids that you lose from vomiting or diarrhea.

10. Get some light exercise. Don’t overdo it, but take a short walk around your neighborhood or do some light housework. Exercise will keep your spirits up and will help to distract you from the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.wikihow.com/

http://www.health.harvard.edu/

Snorting Roxies

Roxy is the street name or shortened version of the opiate Roxicet. Roxicet is a member of the oxycodone family. Roxicet is the same drug as Percocet but is just another brand available.

Roxies come in pill form and can be crushed and snorted to achieve a quicker effect. Snorting roxies can make the effect come on quicker although the effects may not last as long. The biggest positive effect that causes people to want to use roxies is the intense euphoria or feeling of numbness that opiates provide.

The effects of roxies when snorted are but are not limited to constipation, drowsiness, dizziness, vomiting, itching, nausea, etc., while other side effects could be headaches, weakness, sweating, dry mouth, etc.

Adverse side effects include:

  • Unsteadiness
  • Confusion
  • Severe constipation
  • Severe drowsiness
  • Irregular breathing
  • Seizures
  • Mood change and abnormal behavior
  • Allergic reactions like hives
  • Breathing difficulty

When snorting roxies these effects can be more severe. Snorting roxies does serious damage to your lungs and nose. Snorting roxies can eventually lead to the disintegration of the septum and lead to particles of pill being inhaled into the lungs.

Most people end up snorting roxies because they want to achieve a more intense effect of euphoria that roxy already provides. Snorting roxies can easily lead to complications that can be as severe as overdose and death. Snorting roxies can easily turn into a roxy addiction also and when addicted to roxies it can be very hard to stop.

Since Roxy is closely related to heroin, the reaction is the same in the body, which means Roxy is also equally addictive as heroin. With snorting roxies frequently, the tolerance level increases and later the amount of Roxy required to create the same pleasure level becomes more. This eventually leads to addiction to the drug. After snorting roxies it can be hard for someone to stop on their own especially because when they do stop snorting roxies they will begin to experience roxy withdrawal symptoms. Roxy withdrawal symptoms are extremely unpleasant and most of the time the user will choose to begin snorting roxies again instead of continuing to stay abstinent.

Roxy withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Restlessness
  • Backaches
  • Joint pain
  • Weakness
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Chills
  • Sweating
  • High blood pressure
  • Muscle pain
  • Runny nose
  • Dilated pupils

Once someone who experiences addiction to snorting roxies tries to stop and has withdrawal symptoms it may be time for some outside help to their addiction. Snorting roxies can be very hard to stop on their own. In fact if you are snorting roxies chances are that you already need outside help because taking medication recreationally in a way not prescribed is a sign of drug abuse. Drug abuse and addiction are closely linked and most of the times treatment is need to address the addiction. Trying to stop snorting roxies on your own can be a bad idea even though the withdrawal from roxies is not fatal.

If you are snorting roxies and need help it is a good idea to seek treatment because of the damage and dangerousness of the method and drug combined.

Why Should I Stop Using Roxies?

Roxy is the street name for the prescription drug oxycodone. It usually refers to the pure, immediate release form of oxycodone. However, there are several drugs which combine oxycodone with anti-inflammatory medications. In certain circumstances, these drugs may mistakenly be called “roxies.”

The name “roxy” was derived from the brand name “Roxicodone,” which is pure, immediate release oxycodone. It comes in 15mg or 30mg tablets. However, there is another brand name drug, “Roxicet,” which is sometimes mistaken for roxy because of the similarity of the name. Roxicet is oxycodone plus acetaminophen (Tylenol), the same formulation as Percocet. Other oxycodone containing formulations are combined with ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or aspirin.

Roxies are very highly addictive. One of the reasons you should stop using roxies is this addiction potential. Roxies are in the same class of drugs as heroin. They stimulate the same reaction in your brain. They are classified as opiates.

Opiates are both physically and psychologically addicting. Almost no other class of drug has the high physical addiction potential of opiates. Even with occasional or short term use, you can experience withdrawal symptoms when you don’t use them or reduce your dose. You should stop using roxies because the physical withdrawal symptoms can be miserable. While you can’t die from roxy withdrawal alone, you will wish you would. Common roxy withdrawal symptoms include extreme pain, tremors, muscle cramps, sweating, chills, rapid heartbeat, itching, restless leg syndrome, runny nose, sneezing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness.

Another reason you should stop using roxies is that it is highly illegal to possess them without a prescription and law enforcement officials are cracking down. Roxies are a schedule II narcotic, which is the most highly regulated class of prescription drugs. In some states, you can get five to twenty years in prison for possession of roxies without a prescription. Even those with a prescription face legal consequences if they are caught with a bottle that has fewer pills than it should if they were taking it as prescribed.

Law enforcement officials are cracking down because of the “opiate epidemic” that is sweeping the nation. Abuse of prescription narcotics in the US over the last 10 years has skyrocketed. Opiate addicted infants have replaced the “crack” babies of the 1980’s as the newest nightmare for neonatal doctors around the country, and overdoses from opiates like roxies are more common than car accidents. You should stop using roxies because it’s dangerous! Roxies suppress your respiratory system, and overdose deaths are extremely common.

If you want to stop using roxies, you should talk to your healthcare provider or local addiction treatment center. If you are physically addicted to roxies, they will be able to provide you with medication that can alleviate the symptoms of withdrawal while you stop using roxies. They can also help you find support that will help you stop using roxies, because it isn’t always easy. If you are not physically addicted, and you are able to stop using roxies and stay stopped, do it now before you face withdrawal, prison, or overdose.

Is Roxy an Anti-inflammatory?

Is Roxy an Anti-inflammatory?
                                      
 
The short answer to this question is no, roxy is not an anti-inflammatory. But it’s not that simple. Roxy is the street name for the prescription drug oxycodone. It usually refers to the pure, immediate release form of oxycodone. However, there are several drugs which combine oxycodone with anti-inflammatory medications. In certain circumstances, these drugs may mistakenly be called “roxies.”

The name “roxy” was derived from the brand name “Roxicodone,” which is pure, immediate release oxycodone. It comes in 15mg or 30mg tablets. However, there is another brand name drug, “Roxicet,” which is sometimes mistaken for roxy because of the similarity of the name. Roxicet is oxycodone plus acetaminophen (Tylenol), the same formulation as Percocet. Other oxycodone containing formulations are combined with ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or aspirin.

So how does roxy work? How is it different from an anti-inflammatory?

Roxy is a powerful, prescription narcotic analgesic (painkiller). It affects the central nervous system. Roxy binds to opioid receptors in the brain, which are the same sites your natural pain-inhibiting chemicals bind when you are hurt. It reduces the feeling of pain, but does not have any effect on the source of the pain itself. In addition, roxy, like other drugs with abuse potential, triggers the “reward pathway” in the brain. This is the pathway that is activated when something good happens normally- exercise, sex, and chocolate can all trigger this pathway. Drugs of abuse cause an extreme reaction in this pathway, causing an overproduction of so-called “pleasure chemicals” in the brain. Over time, the pathway adapts to the constant influx of these chemicals. It stops producing as many chemicals in response to the drugs (and any other pleasurable event) and the reward pathway also becomes less responsive to the chemicals. When the drugs are stopped or significantly reduced, the individual experiences depression, anxiety, and drug craving.

Anti-inflammatory drugs treat pain too, but in a different way. They diminish pain by reducing inflammation, unlike roxies, which affect the central nervous system. Basically, anti-inflammatories reduce production of a certain enzyme, cyclooxygenase (COX). This is the enzyme that produces prostaglandins, the compounds that travel to the site of an injury and produce inflammation. Inhibiting the COX enzyme can cause some of the negative side effects that are common with anti-inflammatories, most notably gastrointestinal issues.  Prostaglandins also regulate the lining of the stomach, so when the COX enzyme is inhibited and the body produces fewer prostaglandins, the lining gets thinner. Peptic ulcers are a sometimes caused by long-term anti-inflammatory use. However, unlike roxies, anti-inflammatory medications are not habit-forming. They do not stimulate the reward pathway of the brain, and thus do not cause tolerance and addiction. Common anti-inflammatories are aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. Oxycodone plus aspirin is sold under the brand name Percodan or Endodan and oxycodone plus ibuprofen is Combunox.