Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Roxys, slang for Roxicodone – a brand name for the generic oxycodone, is basically heroin in a pill form. It is an opioid, narcotic painkiller that is highly addictive. Roxys can be swallowed, smoked, crushed and snorted, or mixed with water and injected – all just like heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Social Acceptance

What makes roxys worse than heroin, in a way, is their social acceptance. Roxicodone and Roxicet are legal by prescription whereas heroin is a known illicit “street drug.” People who are prescribed roxys by their doctors are more likely to follow doctors’ orders without asking questions about the drug they are being given. Roxicodone is a powerfully potent narcotic that has the same incidence of addictiveness as heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Accessibility

Roxy is arguably worse than heroin because it is a lot more accessible than heroin. Whereas heroin is only available on the street, roxys can be found in many home medicine cabinets. More and more high school students and college students are taking painkillers like roxycodone because their parents or their friends’ parents leave their prescription bottles lying around. Also, people who they themselves have been prescribed roxys due to a legitimate condition with pain become hooked and can simply get their doctors to keep prescribing the painkillers. And, roxys like heroin can be bought “on the street,” too.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Physical Dependence

Roxys come in 15, 20, and 30 mg and it is said that a 30mg pill of Roxicodone or Roxicet is the equivalent to one bag of heroin but that is not a trusted way to compare the two, since heroin potency can vary from bag to bag and batch to batch.

The withdrawal from roxys and heroin can range from mild to severe, depending on how much and how long you have been taking either drug. Withdrawal symptoms usually begin six to 30 hours after last use and can be compared to flu-like in nature. People who are physically dependent on roxys or heroin will experience agitation, anxiety, muscle aches, watery eyes, insomnia, runny nose, sweating, and constant yawning when they suddenly stop using, or go cold turkey. Also, restless legs (and arms, neck, hands, and feet) also called “the jimmies,” anxiety, and depression are all part and parcel of opiate withdrawal. These symptoms are virtually the same for both roxy users and heroin users.

Some people say withdrawal from roxies is worse than heroin and other say that heroin withdrawal is worse. It really depends on the individual, how much they have been using, for how long, and the number of times they have gone cold turkey. Because, every time you “kick” is like a shock to the system and so each time gets worse and worse.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Overdose

Both heroin and roxys are a central nervous system depressant which means that, if you take too much, your breathing can be slowed to a halt. This is when overdose occurs. Many times, people simply fall asleep and stop breathing when they have taken too much of either drug. Heroin may be slightly worse than roxys in this capacity because its potency is never exactly known whereas, a 30mg roxy pill is always 30mg. But, people abusing roxys and heroin have the same tendency to overdo it, leading to tragic repercussions.

So, Are Roxys Worse than Heroin?

Basically, these drugs are one in the same and are both extremely potent and addictive. Because of their social acceptance and accessibility, it can be argued that roxys are worse than heroin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.drugsense.org/

http://alcoholism.about.com/

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

First of all, good luck. If you have never experienced opiate withdrawal symptoms, also called being dope sick, you are lucky. If you have, then you know what hell on earth feels like. And, if you have gone through opiate withdrawals more than once, you probably also have noticed that they get worse every subsequent time you stop or run out of your supply. This is because your body is going through a kind of shock: your brain has been altered by taking opiates (such as Oxycodone, Roxicet, heroin, etc.) and without these substances, your brain and therefore body go into panic mode.

Often times compared to being flu-like symptoms, opiate withdrawals are intense, acute, and although not life-threatening, it sure feels like you’re dying.

While going through opiate withdrawal, you may experience some or all of the following:

  • Agitation and anxiety
  • Depression
  • Muscle aches
  • Watery Eyes
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Runny nose
  • Restlessness
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Dilated pupils
  • Chills and goose bumps

Here are 10 things you can do to survive opiate withdrawal:

1. Prepare a comfortable environment:

Keep your tablet or TV and DVD player nearby so that you can watch some lighthearted movies.

Make sure that your room is at a comfortable temperature, and make sure that you have some soft blankets and maybe a fan. Prepare to change your sheets often because of sweating.

Wear loose and comfortable clothing. Again, you’ll probably have to change clothes a lot because of the sweating.

2. Avoid going through opiate withdrawal alone. If you don’t plan to check yourself into a rehab facility, then stay with someone who can support you during the withdrawal period.

3. Take some time off from your usual activities. Opiate withdrawal may take up to 2 weeks, so try to take some time off of work. If you have a family, then check yourself into a rehab facility or go somewhere where your children won’t have to see you going through opiate withdrawals.

4. Slowly taper off your narcotics. Reduce your doses of opioids or medications by about 20 to 25 percent every 2 or 3 days to minimize opiate withdrawals.

5. Try community detox. Check out your local methadone clinic so that you can gradually wean yourself off of narcotics by taking gradually decreasing doses of methadone. Community detox will allow you to go on with your daily life without checking in to an in-patient facility.

6. Go to a psychiatric ward or other inpatient psychiatric facility if you’ve had episodes of suicidal thoughts or hurting yourself in the past. Opiate withdrawal can bring out these negative behaviors, which could put you in real danger. If you have a history of depression or other psychiatric problems, then do your detox under medical supervision.

7. Check yourself into a rehabilitation facility.

Also called inpatient therapy, you will receive individual and group therapy and support. While you stay in a rehabilitation facility, you can talk to counselors about your addiction or you can spend time in support groups with other addicts.

8. Give yourself a lot of positive reinforcement. Try some of these strategies:

Tell yourself that your withdrawal pains from opiates are like labor pains. You’re giving birth to a new you.

Write a notice to yourself that says, “I’m a fantastic person, and I’m doing something amazing.” Post the notice where you can see it.

Give yourself a non-drug reward for every day that you make it through opiate withdrawal.

9. Remember to eat food and drink water. You may not feel like eating or drinking fluids, but your body needs nourishment and hydration. Eat saltines or yogurt or other foods that are easy on your stomach. Also, be sure to drink water or fruit juice to replace any fluids that you lose from vomiting or diarrhea.

10. Get some light exercise. Don’t overdo it, but take a short walk around your neighborhood or do some light housework. Exercise will keep your spirits up and will help to distract you from the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.wikihow.com/

http://www.health.harvard.edu/

Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms

Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms           

Methadone is a synthetic opioid used for the maintenance of patients with opiate addiction.  Methadone is mainly used in the involvement of stopping or reducing the use of illicit drugs such as heroin and morphine although it also used in the treatment of chronic pain. While this is the case it has been found to be used recreationally for those with opiate addiction.

Methadone addiction is common because it is readily and easily available at methadone clinics. Clinics are where a user may go for the maintenance of their illicit opiate addiction. There they will receive methadone doses for a small payment each day legally. Just because methadone is legal whereas heroin is not, does not mean it is any less addictive or dangerous. The death toll from methadone use has spiked upward dramatically since 1999, with there being about 3,849 known in 2004 compared to 790 in 1999. Mixing methadone with other drugs such as benzodiazepines can be extremely dangerous also.

Methadone is highly physically addictive just as any other opiate. Methadone’s effects can last up to 35 hours and can remain in the body for days. This makes it prime for the maintenance of opiate addiction but also extremely hard to quit. That’s because when stopping methadone use there are going to be methadone withdrawal symptoms. The physical changes in the body after using methadone for a period of time are similar to those when using heroin or any other opiates.

To know if you are going to have methadone withdrawal symptoms, you can look for signs of methadone addiction. Signs of methadone addiction are pinpointed or contracted pupils, drowsiness, constipation, and suppressed breathing or cough reflex. If you or someone you know has been taking methadone for a long period of time and has these signs they most likely are going to go through methadone withdrawal symptoms once they stop their methadone use. Methadone withdrawal symptoms are extremely uncomfortable and while they are not fatal it is very frightening. It can become psychologically as well as physically painful. Methadone withdrawal symptoms can vary based on age, gender, how much or how little you have been using and usually consist of;

  • Physical Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms:
  • Lightheadedness
  • Tearing
  • Runny nose
  • Yawning
  • Sneezing
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Severe Itching
  • Fever
  • Sweating
  • Chills
  • Tremors
  • Aches and pains, often in the joints and/or legs
  • Elevated pain sensitivity
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Reduced breathing (may be fatal between 2–4 hours)

 

  • Psychological Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms:
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Susceptibility to Cravings
  • Depression
  • Prolonged insomnia
  • Delirium
  • Auditory hallucinations
  • Visual hallucinations
  • Increased perception of odors, real or imagined
  • Marked decrease in sex drive
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Panic disorder
  • Paranoia
  • Delusions

Methadone withdrawal symptoms have shown to be up to twice as severe as those of morphine or heroin and are last a significant more amount of time; methadone withdrawal symptoms can last for several weeks or more. At high methadone doses, sudden cessation of therapy can result in methadone withdrawal symptoms described as “the worst withdrawal imaginable,” lasting from weeks to months.

 

 

 

Withdrawal Symptoms from Opiates

Withdrawal Symptoms from Opiates

Withdrawal Symptoms from Opiates

Withdrawal symptoms from opiates is referring to the different experiences that occur after stopping or largely reducing the use of opiate drugs after heavy and prolonged use (usually several weeks or more). The street term for withdrawal symptoms for opiates is known as being dope sick.

Opiates include heroin, morphine, codeine, Oxycontin, Dilaudid, methadone and more.

Around 10% of the United States population misuses opiates at some point during their lifetime. Misusing opiates also means using illegal drugs like heroin and prescription painkillers such as Oxycontin in a way other than prescribed. Drugs, such as opiates, cause physical dependence. A physical dependence to opiates means a person relies on them to prevent symptoms of withdrawal from opiates. Over the course of a few weeks, or a longer period of time, a greater amount of opiates will be needed to produce the same affects in the opiate user. The time that it takes to become physically dependent on opiates differs from person to person. When a person who has become physically dependent on opiates stops taking them, the body has to take some time to recover, the result of this is withdrawal symptoms from opiates. Withdrawal symptoms from opiates can happen whenever a person who has been chronically abusing opiates stops or reduces the amount they are using. There are even some instances where someone ends up withdrawing from opiates after being given the drugs for pain in the hospital. Usually the withdrawal from opiates in this instance is not too bad but it is still uncomfortable and the person doesn’t know what’s happening to them. They think they have the flu.

Early withdrawal symptoms from opiates include:

  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Muscle aches
  • Increased tearing
  • Insomnia
  • Runny nose
  • Sweating
  • Yawning

Late withdrawal symptoms from opiates include:

  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Dilated pupils
  • Goose bumps
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

The withdrawal symptoms from opiates usually begin within the first 12 hours after the last opiate use. For an opiate for methadone it is 30 hours since the last dose. A doctor can quickly tell if a person has opiate withdrawal symptoms just by asking questions and doing an exam. Blood and urine tests can confirm the diagnosis.

There is help for those withdrawal symptoms from opiates. For instance treatment for the withdrawal from opiates includes medications. The most common medication used for opiate withdrawal is clonidine which helps reduce anxiety, agitation, muscle aches, sweating, runny nose, and muscle cramping. Other medications that can be given are there to help treat vomiting and diarrhea. In some instances Buprenoprhine, better known as Suboxone can be given to help the opiate user taper off their drug of choice. It is also good for treating withdrawal symptoms. It helps to reduce the intensity of the opiate withdrawal symptoms. The treatment programs for withdrawal symptoms from opiates are known as detoxes and are purposely in place to help those who are experiencing any kind of withdrawal from any substances what so ever.

It is best if anyone is withdrawing from opiates or any substance to seek medical assistance and utilize a medical opiate detox facility.