The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

When determining which drugs are the hardest drugs to kick, it is helpful to see which the most addictive drugs are. These two concepts are pretty much synonymous. This is because rate of dependence and severity of withdrawal symptoms have everything to do with trying to kick a nasty drug habit.

The following is a list of the 5 hardest drugs to kick, from least to greatest in difficulty. This list is based on a study put together by Dutch scientists who replicated a London study and devised a “dependency rating” that measures addictive potency of the biggest drugs out there. The scale of 0-to-3 shows how the hardest drugs to kick measure up.

#5 Crystal Meth 2.24

What makes crystal meth one of the hardest drugs to kick is that, like heroin and nicotine, meth also imitates dopamine, the reward chemical, and norepinephrine, the alertness chemical, causing your neurons to release more of both—all the while training your brain to want them more. But meth takes it a step further; it can damage dopamine- and norepinephrine-releasing neurons, which leads to a drastic decrease in their production, which makes you crave meth even more.

#4 Methadone 2.68

Basically legalized heroin, methadone is highly addictive because the way it works and is used as a treatment for heroin addiction is to build dependence. And in the case of methadone, dependence is the same as addiction.

Now, it is debatable whether methadone belongs at #4 on the list of hardest drugs to kick because, in my personal experience and from others who have shared their methadone experiences with me, I find it to be a much nastier drug to kick than heroin.

The withdrawals are hell on earth. Heroin withdrawal is said to be more acute but lasts for a much shorter period of time, about a week depending on usage and your body chemistry. Methadone withdrawal is really just as bad when it comes to the severity of the symptoms. What makes methadone harder to kick than heroin is that the withdrawal symptoms last for a longer period of time. And I mean a lot longer. For me it was about a month and a half before I started to feel normal again. Some people experience methadone withdrawal for even longer than that. Because of this, many people return to their drug use to feel better again, making methadone one of the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

#3 Nicotine 2.82

Nicotine mimics chemicals that stimulate the “reward system” in the brain and then actually replaces them. Nicotine addiction occurs because this replacement causes your brain to make less of the naturally occurring good stuff and so the brain now needs nicotine to maintain normal functioning.

Statistics don’t lie: nicotine proves to be one of the hardest drugs to kick by the sheer number of nicotine addicts in the US: 50,000,000; and one in every five deaths nationwide are the result of smoking.

And actually, there is a tie for spots 2 and 3 which many may find surprising. That’s right, the study found that nicotine is just as hard to kick as crack cocaine.

#2 Crack Cocaine 2.82

Although crack is comprised of cocaine, smoking processed crack causes a faster, higher rush that lasts for less time than powder coke. The intensity of the crack high combined with the efficient method of use—smoking—are the big reasons why crack is number two in the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

Crack addiction is dramatically higher than that of snorted cocaine powder. In 2010, there were an estimated 500,000 active crack cocaine addicts in the United States. And although not physical in nature, the psychological withdrawal symptoms from crack are intense and terrifying: hallucinations, severe anxiety, and depression.

#1 Heroin 2.89

Again, statistics show how heroin is one of the hardest drugs to kick. In the US in 2003, an estimated 281,000 people sought treatment for heroin addiction, and according to the National Institute on Drug Addiction, 23% of people who try heroin become full on addicts.

Heroin is easy to get hooked on. It reduces pain while at the same time causes pleasure. Who wouldn’t want to feel this way? By injecting, snorting or smoking heroin, you are training your brain to make you crave it. After you are physically dependent on heroin, the nasty withdrawal symptoms are enough to keep you coming back for more. It’s clear that heroin is the hardest drug to kick once you’re hooked on it.

 Honorable Mention(s):

Alcohol and Benzodiazepines

Both alcohol and benzos (such as Valium and Xanax) are also some of the hardest drugs to kick because the withdrawal symptoms that result from trying to kick cold turkey are very intense and even possibly fatal. People who stop using alcohol and benzos can experience hallucinations, sweats, anxiety, tremors, seizures, cardiac arrest and even death as a result of these symptoms.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.alternet.org/

http://www.thefix.com/

http://www.drugabuse.gov/

What is Hippy Crack?

What is Hippy Crack?

Hippy crack may be better known to you as nitrous oxide and nitrous oxide may be even better known to you as, well, laughing gas or when abuse whip its. Hippy crack is simply laughing gas. Yes, it is the same stuff you get at the dentist. Hippy crack or nitrous oxide is a colorless, non-flammable gas, with a slightly sweet odor and taste. It is used in surgery and dentistry for its anesthetic and analgesic effects. It is known as “laughing gas” because of the euphoric effects of inhaling it; which has led to its recreational use as a dissociative anesthetic and its new name “hippy crack.”

And hippy crack is very popular among young people and even celebrities. Think Demi Moore and kids who aren’t old enough to buy alcohol.

The legal high known as ‘hippy crack’ was used by one in 16 young people, according to new figures. The first data to be released on the use of nitrous oxide reveals more than six per cent, or 350,000 people aged 16-24 year used the drug last year. Because hippy crack is so popular and because of its legality it makes it seem “safe”. This just isn’t the case. Hippy crack or laughing gas as it is lovingly named is actually very dangerous to health.

“Hippy crackheads” or nitrous oxide abusers when they inhale the gas will feel extremely euphoric, dizzy, and detached and numb while high on nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide abusers also may have auditory and visual hallucinations. The high often lasts for three to five minutes. During repeated use, nitrous oxide has been shown to damage the out ring of the cortex in the brain, which is responsible for general awareness; and the connective region of the cortex, which controls episodic (long-term) memory. Symptoms of hippy crack abuse include nausea, slurred speech, lack of coordination and depression. Repeated use of hippy crack also causes B12 vitamin deficiency. Even if the nitrous oxide abuser or hippy crackhead does not overdose, it can put them at risk for anemia. Nitrous oxide reduces red blood cell count since it pushes oxygen out of the blood stream. That can lead to nerve and organ damage.

Hippy crack or laughing gas better known as nitrous oxide can also be fatal. Repeated nitrous oxide abuse causes fatal danger because it causes respiratory depression, also known as hypoventilation. This prevents carbon dioxide from leaving the body, which in turn reduces the amount of oxygen reaching the brain. When the brain does not receive enough oxygen, seizures and loss of consciousness can happen. A common side effect after use is vomiting. Therefore, an unconscious nitrous oxide abuser cannot clear the airway of vomit. Asphyxiation or choking can also occur and cause death since the nitrous oxide has replaced oxygen in the lungs. Inhaling hippy crack can also lead to sudden death syndrome. There have been incidences where just one inhalation of hippy crack has led to death most likely for the reasons mentioned above.

Nitrous oxide may get laughable names such as “hippy crack” or “laughing gas” but it is no joke. Nitrous oxide is a potent gas that can seriously do some damage to the human body and brain as well.

http://voices.yahoo.com/the-dangers-nitrous-oxide-abuse-10888845.html?cat=71