Black Tar Heroin

black tar heroinBlack tar heroin is a cheap form of the potent drug heroin. Black tar heroin is mainly made in Mexico but it can be found in America, as well as, Canada and certain parts of Europe. Black tar heroin is less pure than other heroin making it not only cheaper to produce but also cheaper to buy. Black tar heroin is also known as Cheeb, muck, Mexican mud, brown or black, or boy. Black tar heroin varies in color and texture and also in its potency. Black tar heroin can be any color between black and brown. It is most often very firm and rock like or kind of sticky. Black tar heroin ranges in purity between 30 and 80 percent. Black tar heroin can be injected, snorted, or smoked. Regardless of the routes of administration black tar heroin is very dangerous.

People who abuse prescription drugs are at a high risk of using black tar heroin because it is significantly cheaper and easier to obtain in comparison to prescription drugs like Oxycontin or Vicodin.

When a user inhales or injects black tar heroin, they experience opiate-ish effects which include relaxation, loss of anxiety, and a rush of euphoria that is followed up by a sleepy dream like state. Black tar heroin similar to heroin in that it causes a kind of painless or anesthetic feeling. Many black tar heroin users experience a significant loss of concentration, have trouble focusing, and their balance is affected. They may also have limited responsiveness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, itching, dry mouth and diarrhea. As with other opiate drugs, black tar heroin has a high risk of addiction. It is easy to build a tolerance and dependence can develop quickly to black to heroin which leads to an increase of use and potential overdoses and even death.

The addiction black tar heroin is associated with excruciating and painful withdrawals that can last for a long time. Black tar heroin users will experience a range of symptoms when they begin the process of withdrawals which can include everything including aches, tremors, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, severe headaches, fever, sweating, diarrhea, insomnia, heart palpitation, increased blood pressure and changes to breathing. Users also may experience psychological changes when they have black tar heroin withdrawals that include anxiety, hallucinations, paranoia, depression and suicidal thoughts.

Black tar heroin is a relatively new drug available on the streets but heroin isn’t. Heroin was first discovered in the late 1800’s through a process of synthesizing opium to find a powerful substance than morphine. Black tar heroin was found when scientists synthesized the newly discovered heroin. Initially it was used as a drug to treat respiratory disorders and pain relief but it soon became a popular recreational drug. Heroin was outlawed entirely in the early 1930s but the addiction rates and recreational use didn’t change one bit.

It want until recently that black tar heroin was rediscovered and Mexican drug cartels began to make the drug again. This may have been in response to a global rise in demand and prices for powdered heroin. Drug traffickers and gangs who successfully dealt cocaine wanted to get on the black tar heroin market because it was cheap and easy drug to sell to young and inexperienced people and addicts who had established an established addiction to heroin or cocaine.

DXM Addiction

DXM Addiction

Dextromethorphan (DXM), is a common ingredient found in many over-the-counter cough and cold medicines, and is used as a recreational drug for its dissociative effects. Dextromethorphan has powerful dissociative properties when taken at doses well above the recommended therapeutic dosage for cough suppression. DXM addiction is sometimes referred to in slang form as robo-tripping, derived from the Robitussin brand name, or Triple Cs, which comes from the Coricidin brand because the pills are printed with “CCC,” which stands for Coricidin Cough and Cold.

DXM Effects

DXM in low recreational doses (between 100–200 mg), is described as having a euphoric effect. With middle doses come more intense euphoria, vivid imagination, and closed-eye hallucinations. With high doses of DXM, there is a profound alteration in consciousness and users often report out-of-body experiences or temporary psychosis. Another characteristic of high doses of DXM as seen in DXM addiction is something called “flanging,” speeding up or slowing down of sensory input.

DXM Recreational Use and DXM Addiction

There are definitely specific groups that seem to be at a higher risk of DXM abuse and DXM addiction, including teenagers, alcoholics, and narcotic abusers. Other street names for DXM include: “Candy,” “C-C-C,” “Dex,” “DM,” “Drex,” “Red Devils,” “Robo,” “Rojo,” “Skittles,” “Tussin,” “Velvet,” and “Vitamin D.” And slang terms for abusing DXM are: “Dexing,” “Robotripping,” and “Robodosing.” Some findings suggest that DXM can produce ethanol-like effects in both alcoholics and non-alcoholics and can cause a mild form of craving in alcoholics. In 2005, following the deaths of 5 teenagers known to use DXM in pure powder form, the FDA expressed its concern about potential DXM abuse and DXM addiction.

Plateaus of DXM Use Leading to DXM Addiction

First plateau: alertness, restlessness, increased heartbeat, increased body temperature, intensification of emotions, euphoria, loss of balance, and mild inebriation similar to drunkenness.

Second plateau: effects are similar to the first plateau, but with heavier intoxication, choppy sensory input, a dreamlike state of consciousness, some detachment from outside world, and closed-eye hallucinations; slurred speech, mild hallucinations, short term memory impairment.

Third plateau: difficulty recognizing people or objects, chaotic blindness, dreamlike vision, inability to comprehend language, abstract hallucinations, delayed reaction time, decision making impairment, feelings of peace and quiet, near complete loss of motor coordination, short-term memory impairment, and/or feelings of rebirth. This third level is an altered state of consciousness and vision or other senses may be impaired.

Fourth plateau: loss of contact and control with their own body, changes in visual perception, out-of-body experiences, perceptions of contact with “superior” beings, lack of movement or desire to move, rapid heart rate, complete blindness, increased hearing, and intensification of third plateau effects. The fourth state, a person can lose contact with their body and with all senses shut off. This level of intoxication is similar to using PCP or to that of being in a K hole (overdose of ketamine known as Special K).

Plateau Sigma: occurs by prolonging dosage; marked by psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations. Users report auditory hallucinations, for example rather than simply feeling tired and sitting down, a user might hear a voice saying, “sit down now, you’re tired,” and feel compelled to obey. These experiences are mostly described as unpleasant.

Symptoms of DXM Addiction

A survey of DXM users showed that more than half of them reported experiencing the following withdrawal symptoms for the first week after long-term and/or chronic use, or DXM addiction: fatigue, apathy, flashbacks, and constipation. Over a quarter of DXM users reported insomnia, nightmares, an inability to experience pleasure in usual activities, impaired memory, attention deficit and decreased libido. Other more rare side effects reported were panic attacks, impaired learning, tremor, jaundice, hives and muscle aches. Frequent and long-term usage at very high doses could possibly lead to toxic psychosis and other permanent psychological problems.

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://www.jabfm.org/

The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

When determining which drugs are the hardest drugs to kick, it is helpful to see which the most addictive drugs are. These two concepts are pretty much synonymous. This is because rate of dependence and severity of withdrawal symptoms have everything to do with trying to kick a nasty drug habit.

The following is a list of the 5 hardest drugs to kick, from least to greatest in difficulty. This list is based on a study put together by Dutch scientists who replicated a London study and devised a “dependency rating” that measures addictive potency of the biggest drugs out there. The scale of 0-to-3 shows how the hardest drugs to kick measure up.

#5 Crystal Meth 2.24

What makes crystal meth one of the hardest drugs to kick is that, like heroin and nicotine, meth also imitates dopamine, the reward chemical, and norepinephrine, the alertness chemical, causing your neurons to release more of both—all the while training your brain to want them more. But meth takes it a step further; it can damage dopamine- and norepinephrine-releasing neurons, which leads to a drastic decrease in their production, which makes you crave meth even more.

#4 Methadone 2.68

Basically legalized heroin, methadone is highly addictive because the way it works and is used as a treatment for heroin addiction is to build dependence. And in the case of methadone, dependence is the same as addiction.

Now, it is debatable whether methadone belongs at #4 on the list of hardest drugs to kick because, in my personal experience and from others who have shared their methadone experiences with me, I find it to be a much nastier drug to kick than heroin.

The withdrawals are hell on earth. Heroin withdrawal is said to be more acute but lasts for a much shorter period of time, about a week depending on usage and your body chemistry. Methadone withdrawal is really just as bad when it comes to the severity of the symptoms. What makes methadone harder to kick than heroin is that the withdrawal symptoms last for a longer period of time. And I mean a lot longer. For me it was about a month and a half before I started to feel normal again. Some people experience methadone withdrawal for even longer than that. Because of this, many people return to their drug use to feel better again, making methadone one of the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

#3 Nicotine 2.82

Nicotine mimics chemicals that stimulate the “reward system” in the brain and then actually replaces them. Nicotine addiction occurs because this replacement causes your brain to make less of the naturally occurring good stuff and so the brain now needs nicotine to maintain normal functioning.

Statistics don’t lie: nicotine proves to be one of the hardest drugs to kick by the sheer number of nicotine addicts in the US: 50,000,000; and one in every five deaths nationwide are the result of smoking.

And actually, there is a tie for spots 2 and 3 which many may find surprising. That’s right, the study found that nicotine is just as hard to kick as crack cocaine.

#2 Crack Cocaine 2.82

Although crack is comprised of cocaine, smoking processed crack causes a faster, higher rush that lasts for less time than powder coke. The intensity of the crack high combined with the efficient method of use—smoking—are the big reasons why crack is number two in the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

Crack addiction is dramatically higher than that of snorted cocaine powder. In 2010, there were an estimated 500,000 active crack cocaine addicts in the United States. And although not physical in nature, the psychological withdrawal symptoms from crack are intense and terrifying: hallucinations, severe anxiety, and depression.

#1 Heroin 2.89

Again, statistics show how heroin is one of the hardest drugs to kick. In the US in 2003, an estimated 281,000 people sought treatment for heroin addiction, and according to the National Institute on Drug Addiction, 23% of people who try heroin become full on addicts.

Heroin is easy to get hooked on. It reduces pain while at the same time causes pleasure. Who wouldn’t want to feel this way? By injecting, snorting or smoking heroin, you are training your brain to make you crave it. After you are physically dependent on heroin, the nasty withdrawal symptoms are enough to keep you coming back for more. It’s clear that heroin is the hardest drug to kick once you’re hooked on it.

 Honorable Mention(s):

Alcohol and Benzodiazepines

Both alcohol and benzos (such as Valium and Xanax) are also some of the hardest drugs to kick because the withdrawal symptoms that result from trying to kick cold turkey are very intense and even possibly fatal. People who stop using alcohol and benzos can experience hallucinations, sweats, anxiety, tremors, seizures, cardiac arrest and even death as a result of these symptoms.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.alternet.org/

http://www.thefix.com/

http://www.drugabuse.gov/

Symptoms of Drug Addiction

Symptoms of Drug Addiction

What is drug addiction?

Addiction is the dependence on an illegal drug or even a prescription medication. When someone is addicted they cannot control their drug use. Most of the time those who are addicted will continue to use drugs despite the negative consequences. Addiction also causes an intense craving for drugs in the addict or alcohol. Those who are addicted may want to quit but they struggle to do it on their own. For most people with addiction their drug use began as casual or even recreational, “just for fun”. Then their drug use slowly progressed. Addiction causes serious problems, long-term consequences with physical, mental and emotional health, with relationships, holding a job, and the law.

So what are some of the physical symptoms of drug addiction?

The physical symptoms of a drug addiction vary depending on what drug the addict has been using and the addict themselves. There are some general physical symptoms of drug addiction though:

  • Tolerance – A tolerance to drugs means that the addict has to use more and more of the same substance in order to achieve the desired effect.
  • Withdrawal – If someone ever experiences withdrawal symptoms when they cut back or try to stop their drug use they are definitely addicted.
  • Sleeping a lot more or a lot less
  • Weight loss or weight gain
  • Persistent coughs and sniffles
  • Pupils of the eyes appearing larger or smaller than usual
  • Unwell at times and better at other times
  • Red eyes, glazed eyes, wandering gaze
  • Incessant scratching or rubbing

What are some psychological symptoms of drug addiction?

  • Mood changes from happy to sad to excited to anxious
  • Increased irritability and a quick temper
  • Having hallucinations
  • Overly energetic mood
  • Suspicious and paranoid
  • Being mentally withdrawn-Spaced out or zoned out

What are the emotional symptoms of drug addiction?

  • Increased feelings of loneliness and ostracism
  • Increased irritability
  • Unexplainable anxiety
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Feelings of abandonment (for both the addict and the people in the addict’s life)
  • Stress from strained relationships
  • Fear that the addiction is out of control
  • Fear of rejection if addiction is discovered
  • Fear that even if the addict gets sober, they will no longer be accepted by their social circle
  • Anger at people who “don’t get it”
  • Withdraws from social events

Some other symptoms of drug addiction are financial and within relationships. For instance the loss of a marriage, going to jail, legal issues, loss of job, loss of home, kicked out of school, abusive relationships etc. These outward consequences are not the symptoms of drug addiction that really effect the addict though, it is the emotional symptoms that really bring an addict down and may make them want to stop using drugs and break free from their addiction.

When someone is experiencing severe symptoms of drug addiction it can take them a short or long period of time to realize they need to stop using drugs because they have formed a dependence on the substance. But should they ever want help the best bet for someone experience symptoms of drug addiction is to seek outside help from a drug rehabilitation center.

Sources:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/drug-addiction/DS00183/DSECTION=symptoms

http://www.ehow.com/about_4781432_psychological-symptoms-drug-abuse.html