Roxy, Oxy, and Opana

Roxy, Oxy, and Opana

Roxy, oxy and opana are pretty much the crème de la crème for opiate addicts. First it was oxy, then it was roxy, and more recently it has become opana. Opana abuse has increased recently because of the new formulation of roxy, oxy that keep users from being able to break down the pills and shoot them up. Roxy, oxy and opana are all very similar in their effects but roxy, oxy are essentially the same drug: oxycodone. Opana is oxymorphone.

Roxy, oxy and opana: Roxy, oxy

The active ingredient in roxy is oxycodone, so essentially roxy, oxy are one and the same. Oxycodone is also found in Percocet, OxyContin, OxyFast, etc. Some of these meds, such as roxy and oxy, are short acting, while OxyContin is a sustained release medication.

Oxy is an opiate medication prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. It bears much similarity to hydrocodone, which is most commonly known under the brand name Vicodin. However, oxycodone is believed to be more potent than hydrocodone, making it the drug of choice for many opiate abusers who take the drug for its euphoric effects. In high doses, it can cause shallow breathing, hypotension, circulatory collapse, respiratory arrest and death. Roxy is just one of the name brands of oxy.

Roxy, oxy and opana: Opana

The drug Opana, also known as Oxymorphone, is an opioid pain reliever which is similar to morphine. Reformulated OxyContin (oxy) pills make getting high harder, so opioid abusers are turning to Opana (oxymorphone) instead, according to a July 12, 2012, report in USA Today. As a result, the report added, Opana-related crime, including pharmacy robberies and overdose deaths, as well as treatment for oxymorphone addiction have been rising in several states.

Prior to August 2010, when Purdue Pharma reformulated OxyContin, opioid abusers could crush, break, or dissolve the pills in order to snort or inject the drug, which produces a more rapid high. The new formulation cannot be broken, crushed, or dissolved, so addicts must either take larger quantities of the drug or find another option. In Kentucky, according to USA Today, oxymorphone appeared as a factor in 23% of overdoses in 2011, up from just 2% in 2010. In nearby Ohio, the Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring Network reported in January 2012 that many opioid abusers said they were using oxymorphone as a replacement for oxy. This is not the first time oxymorphone abuse has been in the spotlight. According to a May 2011 intelligence brief from the Drug Enforcement Administration, oxymorphone abuse was popular during the early 1970s, when many who injected it considered it superior to heroin or morphine. The brief singled out New Castle, Delaware, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as present-day hot spots of oxymorphone abuse.

Other than a drug test, one can use the following symptoms to detect or roxy, oxy and opana abuse:

•Drowsiness, sometimes to the point of nodding off

•Sedation

•Euphoria

•Lightheadedness

•Itching

•Nausea and vomiting

•Constipation

•Low blood pressure

•Respiratory suppression

•Headache

•Dry mouth

•Sweating

Constricted pupils, although overdose may bring about dilated pupils.

Overdose deaths can occur due to respiratory suppression, especially when oxy, roxy, and opana or any opiate is combined with another drug that suppresses respiration, like another opiate, benzodiazepines or alcohol.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_difference_between_the_pain_medications_oxycodone_and_roxicodone

http://www.pharmacytimes.com/news/Reformulated-OxyContin-Leads-to-Increased-Opana-Abuse

What are Roxy pills?

roxy pills

A Roxy pill, or Roxicodone, is a brand name for the generic drug, Oxycodone. It is a narcotic painkiller. Roxicodone pills are also called Roxy pills, Roxy’s, Roxies (or any variation of spelling), blueberries, blues, 30s (for the 30 milligram strength).

Roxy pills are currently among the most abused drugs. Statistics show that Roxy pills and other narcotics like it are mostly abused by people ranging from 16 to 49 years old with some as young as 12 years old having at least tried one of these painkillers in a recreational way. Painkillers like Roxy pills are becoming the first go-to drug for recreational use, being “experimented with” even before marijuana and cocaine.

Roxy pills are pure opioid (synthetically produced opiate), meaning they do not contain aspirin or Tylenol like other narcotics of the same drug classification. Roxy pills are a Schedule II drug. Other drugs in this class include Methadone, Oxycodone (Percocet), Hydrocodone (Vicodin) and many, many others. There are a few different pills that are narcotic pain killers in pill form. There is Roxicet, also called Tylox, Roxanol (also called Morphine), Roxicodone (Percocet without the Tylenol). Anyone of these narcotic pain killers are strong, require a prescription, and could be called “Roxie.” These drugs are prescribed for moderate to severe pain.

Side effects while taking Roxy pills include respiratory depression, meaning breathing is slowed or may even stop if overdose occurs; hypotension, or low blood pressure; sweating; anxiety; sleepiness; itchiness; urinary difficulty/urinary tract infection; physical dependence; loss of appetite; dizziness; dry mouth; headaches and migraines.

And because of their potency, many people abuse Roxy pills for the euphoric “high” they experience. The ways in which Roxy pills are abused include being eaten (slang for swallowed), snorted/sniffed, smoked (as in free-based), slammed/banged/shot (slang terms for injected).

Signs of use and abuse of Roxy pills include “doctor shopping” and having multiple prescriptions; raiding medicine cabinets, medications going missing; always out of money; irritability; “pinned” pupils; agitated or restless behaviors; secretive behaviors such as hiding medications, isolation, and withdrawal from social activities; extreme and/or rapid weight loss.

Signs and outcome of overdose of Roxy pills include seizures, slowed or cessation of breath, hospitalization, coma, and death.

Those who take Roxy pills long term and suddenly stop will more than likely experience opioid abstinence syndrome, or simply “(the) withdrawals:” extreme flu-like symptoms such as sweats/night sweats, chills, diarrhea, vomiting, and body aches. In addition, people going through withdrawals from Roxy pills experience runny nose, sneezing, yawning, goose bumps, insomnia, restless limbs (aka “the
jerks,” “the jimmies”), and lethargy. As if these were not bad enough, withdrawal from Roxy pills also involves psychological symptoms including (increased) anxiety and depression, irritability, mood swings, and an overall extreme lack of will to do anything, including self-care like brushing your teeth and showering. Basically hell on earth. I always knew that the dreaded withdrawal onslaught from Roxy pills was coming when I’d wake up with what I called “dewy eyes” – during the night, my night sweats would have begun and that sweat would then pool in the corners of my eyes. When I awoke in this way, it only took a few minutes for the full-on effect of the withdrawals to begin. Worst.feeling.ever.

Sources:

www.detoxanswers.com

www.wiki.answers.com

www.wikipedia.org

www.nih.gov

www.prescriptiondrugabuse.org

Signs of Roxy Addiction

Signs of Roxy Addiction

Signs of Roxy Addiction

There may come a point where you wonder if you or someone you love is addicted to roxies. “Roxy” is the street name for the drug oxycodone, which is a prescription narcotic painkiller. It is classified as an opiate, like heroin or morphine.

Signs of Roxy Addiction: You

If you have been taking roxies and are wondering if you may be addicted, here are some signs of roxy addiction:

  • Constantly thinking about roxies
  • Obtaining multiple prescriptions for oxycodone
  • Feeling pain when the drug is not available
  • Flu-like symptoms when you try to stop using roxies
  • Restless thoughts or behaviors
  • Lying or stealing to obtain more roxies
  • Using roxies in secret
  • Hiding roxies around the house

Signs of Roxy Addiction: Loved one

If you suspect a friend or family member is addicted to roxies, there are some signs of roxy addiction you can look out to. The physical signs are usually specific to the class of drugs. Someone who is taking roxies or using heroin, for example, will act differently than someone who is abusing cocaine or amphetamines. However, behavioral signs of addiction are similar no matter what drugs are abused.

Signs of Roxy Addiction: Loved one: Physical

  • Pinpoint pupils: Roxy use makes the pupils constrict unnaturally. Normally the pupil dilates or constricts depending on the light in the room. When a person is on roxies, their pupil stays small no matter what. Likewise, when a person is withdrawing from roxies, their pupil will dilate unnaturally.
  • Unsteady gait
  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Nodding out: Nodding refers to people on opiates when they are in a state between sleep and waking. They may close their eyes and their head may droop while having a conversation or standing. They may catch themselves and wake up at this point or lose consciousness completely.
  • Sudden weight loss
  • Slurred words
  • Constipation
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting
  • Sweating
  • Withdrawal: If a person is unable to get his (or her) usual dose of oxycodone, they will begin to suffer from withdrawal symptoms. He will be restless, agitated and sweaty. He’ll suffer from muscle and bone pain, depression, diarrhea, chills, insomnia, vomiting and nausea.
  • Track marks: Some roxy abusers crush up the pills and inject them. Track marks may look like cat scratches that never seem to go away and grow within a short period of time.

Signs of Roxy Addiction: Loved one: Behavioral

  • Lying about roxy use
  • Using roxies without a prescription
  • Using roxies in other than pill form: Some people are prescribed to roxies for legitimate pain. If they take them exactly as prescribed and in the correct dose, they may not become addicted. However, even a legitimate prescription can lead to addiction if the person takes more than they are supposed to, for a longer period of time, and begins crushing the pills to snort if, inject it, or swallow the powder.
  • Stealing money, medication, or other items of value
  • Sudden mood swings
  • Visiting multiple doctors for the same problem
  • Isolating
  • Losing interest in things they used to enjoy
  • Hanging out with people who use roxies
  • Missing work or school
  • Unexplained financial or legal problems
  • Compulsive behavior
  • Drug craving
  • Depression

How Being a Roxy Addict Can Ruin Your Life

How Being a Roxy Addict Can Ruin Your Life

How Being a Roxy Addict Can Ruin Your Life

When I was 24, my boyfriend introduced me to roxies. I was in graduate school so I was studying all the time and really stressed. One night when we were hanging out, he asked me if I wanted to try one. It wasn’t the first time I’d tried drugs. In high school, I was all about the hallucinogens: ecstasy and LSD, for the most part. In college, I drank heavily and did some coke. I’d even tried painkillers before- Vicodin or Percocet. However, I’d never had anything like roxies. He crushed up the little blue pill and gave me half to snort. Almost immediately, I felt light and happy. All my pain went away-physical and emotional. I wasn’t stressed about school anymore. I didn’t care about it, I didn’t care about anything. I felt free.

I started off just doing roxies on the weekends. I’d look forward to it all week long. On Fridays, I couldn’t wait to meet up with my boyfriend and get some of those little blue pills. I’d say to myself “Some people have a drink at the end of a long week, but I don’t really like alcohol, so this is what I do.” I was constantly chasing that feeling when I first used roxies; that high. I could never quite get there, even though I was doing more and more every time.

It wasn’t long until I wanted that relief during the week too. After I finished my studies, I’d snort roxies and just relax. No big deal. But my habit started to get expensive. I began to charge groceries and gas on credit cards so I could use all my cash for roxies. Each month, I’d just pay the minimum payment, so my debt began to grow.

I got frustrated when I couldn’t get as many pills as I wanted from my dealer. Each day I’d buy enough for the next couple, but I always ran out too soon. One day, my dealer asked if I wanted to go to a pill mill for him. These were basically shady doctors who would trade roxy prescriptions for cash. He said he’d pay for my first visit, pay for 100 roxies I was prescribed, and then I could keep going to the doctor on my own and keep all the roxies in the future. I ended up being prescribed 180 roxies on my first visit, so right off the bat I got to keep 80 pills for free.

I began doing roxies every day. I was no longer even getting high; I just needed the pills to feel normal. If I skipped a dose I’d get very very sick. I was going to the pill mill every month, and eventually was getting 210 pills a month. It didn’t matter; I would still run out before my next visit. I started going to multiple clinics.

Eventually, I lost everything to my roxy addiction. I was kicked out of school. When I couldn’t pay rent, I was evicted from my apartment. My credit cards got cancelled when I could no longer make a minimum payment. I ended up living in my car, waking up every morning wanting to die because of my withdrawal. One day while I was sweating and puking in a parking lot, a woman walked by. She looked at me with so much pity; I finally saw myself and what I was doing. I decided to get help.

5 Stupid Things You Might Do On Roxies

5 Stupid Things You Might Do On Roxies

I’ve done a lot of stupid things on roxies. Roxies kind of made me feel invincible, and I never realized how high I actually was. I thought I was fooling everyone around me, but in the end I was just fooling myself. Here are the top 5 stupid things I did on roxies.

5 Stupid Things You Might Do On Roxies: Burn yourself

Anyone who smokes cigarettes while doing roxies has probably burned themselves at some point. Towards the end of my run, I didn’t own any clothes without burn marks on them. I’d get high, light a cigarette, and nod out. The burning of my skin would rouse me slightly, but since I was on painkillers, it would sometimes take a minute before I really felt the burn. I’d wake slightly, take a drag, and nod back out. This cycle would repeat itself over and over.

5 Stupid Things You Might Do On Roxies: Nod out in public

When I was on roxies, I always believed that I was completely fooling everyone around me. I’d go on with my normal life, and not even realize that it was totally apparent that I was high. I nodded out at my desk at work, at family functions, and during class. It wasn’t until I got clean that I realized that I wasn’t fooling anyone.

5 Stupid Things You Might Do On Roxies: Drive High

I always thought I was good to drive when I was on roxies. Even when I could barely keep my eyes open, I’d get behind the wheel. This was a really stupid thing to do on roxies. My reaction time was so much slower than a normal person. I ended up getting in two major accidents within three months, and only by the grace of God did I avoid a DUI charge.

5 Stupid Things You Might Do On Roxies: Call the cops

I When I was home for Christmas, my sisters reminded me of something that happened while I was still using. My roxies were prescribed by pill mill doctors, so I had prescriptions for them. One day, my worried mom took my prescription bottles, and I freaked out. I didn’t care that she loved me and wanted the best for me. I didn’t care that she was the only one who had put up with me for so long; that she had provided me a place to live, food and a car when my addiction got bad. All I cared about was getting the drugs back. I called the cops on my mom, and they came and made her give me back the prescription bottles.

5 Stupid Things You Might Do On Roxies: Drink

For me, drinking while I was on roxies was one of the stupidest things I could do. It meant instant blackout. The next morning, I would wake up with heaviness in the pit of my stomach, trying to remember what the hell had happened the night before. Not to mention that drinking while I was on roxies was a really great way to overdose, not that I ever really considered that while I was using.

Signs of Roxy Use/Roxy Addiction Signs

The addiction of prescription pills has become a deadly epidemic worldwide. Roxycotin is a well-known narcotic pain killer. It is often referred to on the streets as roxy, roxies, blues, dum dums, blueberries, and smurfs. The active ingredient oxycodone in roxycontin is what makes this pain killer a highly addictive drug. Oxycodone is an opium derivative which causes addiction in the body and the brain. After excessive use of this drug or roxy use, your body stops producing the proper chemicals in your brain (dopamine & serotonin) because it relies on the roxy use for the chemical. With proper detoxification, it can take a recovering addict up to 3 years for the brain to start producing the proper levels of dopamine and serotonin for the body to feel normal again.

When a friend or a loved one becomes addicted to prescription pain pills you have to look for warning signs of roxy use and roxy addiction signs. Understanding that the addicted person doesn’t always realize they have a problem is a good place to start. Some roxy addicts may even use the excuse of “a doctor prescribed them to me.”  By law prescription drugs such as roxys are to be prescribed by an authorized doctor. An addict will go through all the different ways possible to get their pills, this includes doctor shopping and illegally buying them on the street. Prescription pills such as roxys are supposed to be taken as prescribed by your doctor, but once the addiction has gotten so bad, you will find signs of roxy use and roxy addiction signs such as the addict snorting them or even melting them down and shooting them up intravenously.

Roxy drug abuse is a growing problem worldwide, and many people don’t take it as serious as they should. Addicts come to depend on the drugs to feel better, some addicts depend on them so much that they need a pill just to get out of bed. While their addiction continues, despite the negative consequences for the users, they risk the well- being of their children, family, and friends. When an addict uses prescription drugs, the medication changes their brain’s chemistry, which now the addict has become physically dependent on the drugs.

Warning Signs of Roxy Use/Roxy Addiction Signs

  • Changes in their appearance
  • Weight loss
  • Changed sleeping habits
  • Always asking for money/broke
  • Unable to keep a job
  • Slurred speech
  • Falling asleep during conversation
  • Trouble with the law

Roxy Addiction Signs

Drug addiction symptoms or behaviors include:

  • Feeling that you have to use the drug regularly — this can be daily or even several times a day
  • Failing in your attempts to stop using the drug
  • Making certain that you maintain a supply of the drug
  • Spending money on the drug even though you can’t afford it
  • Doing things to obtain the drug that you normally wouldn’t do, such as stealing
  • Feeling that you need the drug to deal with your problems
  • Driving or doing other risky activities when you’re under the influence of the drug
  • Focusing more and more time and energy on getting and using the drug