Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Roxys, slang for Roxicodone – a brand name for the generic oxycodone, is basically heroin in a pill form. It is an opioid, narcotic painkiller that is highly addictive. Roxys can be swallowed, smoked, crushed and snorted, or mixed with water and injected – all just like heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Social Acceptance

What makes roxys worse than heroin, in a way, is their social acceptance. Roxicodone and Roxicet are legal by prescription whereas heroin is a known illicit “street drug.” People who are prescribed roxys by their doctors are more likely to follow doctors’ orders without asking questions about the drug they are being given. Roxicodone is a powerfully potent narcotic that has the same incidence of addictiveness as heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Accessibility

Roxy is arguably worse than heroin because it is a lot more accessible than heroin. Whereas heroin is only available on the street, roxys can be found in many home medicine cabinets. More and more high school students and college students are taking painkillers like roxycodone because their parents or their friends’ parents leave their prescription bottles lying around. Also, people who they themselves have been prescribed roxys due to a legitimate condition with pain become hooked and can simply get their doctors to keep prescribing the painkillers. And, roxys like heroin can be bought “on the street,” too.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Physical Dependence

Roxys come in 15, 20, and 30 mg and it is said that a 30mg pill of Roxicodone or Roxicet is the equivalent to one bag of heroin but that is not a trusted way to compare the two, since heroin potency can vary from bag to bag and batch to batch.

The withdrawal from roxys and heroin can range from mild to severe, depending on how much and how long you have been taking either drug. Withdrawal symptoms usually begin six to 30 hours after last use and can be compared to flu-like in nature. People who are physically dependent on roxys or heroin will experience agitation, anxiety, muscle aches, watery eyes, insomnia, runny nose, sweating, and constant yawning when they suddenly stop using, or go cold turkey. Also, restless legs (and arms, neck, hands, and feet) also called “the jimmies,” anxiety, and depression are all part and parcel of opiate withdrawal. These symptoms are virtually the same for both roxy users and heroin users.

Some people say withdrawal from roxies is worse than heroin and other say that heroin withdrawal is worse. It really depends on the individual, how much they have been using, for how long, and the number of times they have gone cold turkey. Because, every time you “kick” is like a shock to the system and so each time gets worse and worse.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Overdose

Both heroin and roxys are a central nervous system depressant which means that, if you take too much, your breathing can be slowed to a halt. This is when overdose occurs. Many times, people simply fall asleep and stop breathing when they have taken too much of either drug. Heroin may be slightly worse than roxys in this capacity because its potency is never exactly known whereas, a 30mg roxy pill is always 30mg. But, people abusing roxys and heroin have the same tendency to overdo it, leading to tragic repercussions.

So, Are Roxys Worse than Heroin?

Basically, these drugs are one in the same and are both extremely potent and addictive. Because of their social acceptance and accessibility, it can be argued that roxys are worse than heroin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.drugsense.org/

http://alcoholism.about.com/

Roxy, Oxy, and Opana

Roxy, Oxy, and Opana

Roxy, oxy and opana are pretty much the crème de la crème for opiate addicts. First it was oxy, then it was roxy, and more recently it has become opana. Opana abuse has increased recently because of the new formulation of roxy, oxy that keep users from being able to break down the pills and shoot them up. Roxy, oxy and opana are all very similar in their effects but roxy, oxy are essentially the same drug: oxycodone. Opana is oxymorphone.

Roxy, oxy and opana: Roxy, oxy

The active ingredient in roxy is oxycodone, so essentially roxy, oxy are one and the same. Oxycodone is also found in Percocet, OxyContin, OxyFast, etc. Some of these meds, such as roxy and oxy, are short acting, while OxyContin is a sustained release medication.

Oxy is an opiate medication prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. It bears much similarity to hydrocodone, which is most commonly known under the brand name Vicodin. However, oxycodone is believed to be more potent than hydrocodone, making it the drug of choice for many opiate abusers who take the drug for its euphoric effects. In high doses, it can cause shallow breathing, hypotension, circulatory collapse, respiratory arrest and death. Roxy is just one of the name brands of oxy.

Roxy, oxy and opana: Opana

The drug Opana, also known as Oxymorphone, is an opioid pain reliever which is similar to morphine. Reformulated OxyContin (oxy) pills make getting high harder, so opioid abusers are turning to Opana (oxymorphone) instead, according to a July 12, 2012, report in USA Today. As a result, the report added, Opana-related crime, including pharmacy robberies and overdose deaths, as well as treatment for oxymorphone addiction have been rising in several states.

Prior to August 2010, when Purdue Pharma reformulated OxyContin, opioid abusers could crush, break, or dissolve the pills in order to snort or inject the drug, which produces a more rapid high. The new formulation cannot be broken, crushed, or dissolved, so addicts must either take larger quantities of the drug or find another option. In Kentucky, according to USA Today, oxymorphone appeared as a factor in 23% of overdoses in 2011, up from just 2% in 2010. In nearby Ohio, the Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring Network reported in January 2012 that many opioid abusers said they were using oxymorphone as a replacement for oxy. This is not the first time oxymorphone abuse has been in the spotlight. According to a May 2011 intelligence brief from the Drug Enforcement Administration, oxymorphone abuse was popular during the early 1970s, when many who injected it considered it superior to heroin or morphine. The brief singled out New Castle, Delaware, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as present-day hot spots of oxymorphone abuse.

Other than a drug test, one can use the following symptoms to detect or roxy, oxy and opana abuse:

•Drowsiness, sometimes to the point of nodding off

•Sedation

•Euphoria

•Lightheadedness

•Itching

•Nausea and vomiting

•Constipation

•Low blood pressure

•Respiratory suppression

•Headache

•Dry mouth

•Sweating

Constricted pupils, although overdose may bring about dilated pupils.

Overdose deaths can occur due to respiratory suppression, especially when oxy, roxy, and opana or any opiate is combined with another drug that suppresses respiration, like another opiate, benzodiazepines or alcohol.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_difference_between_the_pain_medications_oxycodone_and_roxicodone

http://www.pharmacytimes.com/news/Reformulated-OxyContin-Leads-to-Increased-Opana-Abuse

Q&A: Why would anyone want to shoot up Roxies?

Why would anyone want to shoot up Roxies?

Q&A: Why would anyone want to shoot up Roxies?

First of all, let us clarify what we are talking about. “Roxies” or “Roxy” is the street name for the drug oxycodone (so named because the brand name of the medication is Roxicodone.)They are also called “blues,” “blueberries,” and “30’s”. This is because they are blue in color and commonly come in 30mg doses, although other doses may be called “roxies” too.

“Shoot up roxies” refers to the method of administration, namely IV injection. This medication is not intended to be used in this manner, it is an oral medication, so shooting up roxies qualifies as drug abuse.

So why would anyone want to shoot up roxies?

Well, for one, IV administration of oxycodone gets the drug into the blood stream immediately. When you take oxycodone orally, it takes a while to be broken down by your digestive system and hit your system. This is partially why someone would want to shoot up roxies-the high, the euphoria, hits a lot faster.

Another reason why someone would want to shoot up roxies is that it gives a stronger high. When roxies are taken orally, they travel through your GI system and your liver before they get to your blood stream. Some of the strength of the chemical is lessened by this process. It is known as “first-pass metabolism,” and it means that the high won’t be as strong when you take the medication orally.

So that’s basically it, people shoot up roxies to get a fast, strong high.

Roxies are a strong, highly addictive drug, and when someone shoots up roxies, they are even more addictive. The faster a drug hits your system, the more addictive potential it has. But the addiction potential isn’t the only potential risk when you shoot up roxies.

When you shoot up roxies, you put yourself at a higher risk of overdose. The drug was formulated to be taken orally, at prescribed doses. When you shoot up roxies, even if you only shoot up the normal prescribed dose, you could easily go into respiratory arrest and die.

Another problem when you shoot up roxies is that you put yourself at greater risk of infection. Drug addicts don’t always have access to clean needles. In some states, it is illegal to sell needles without a prescription. In other states, the cost of clean needles may be prohibitive. Either way, if you reuse your own needles or share someone else’s, you are at high risk for disease and infection.

Most people don’t observe sterile procedure when they shoot up roxies. Repeated injection can cause abscesses to form at the injection site. These abscesses can cause scarring, loss of limb, even death, depending on the type of bacteria that infects the IV drug user and how soon they seek medical attention.

Sharing needles when you shoot up roxies can put you at greater risk for contracting blood borne illnesses like Hepatitis C and HIV. About forty percent of people with Hepatitis C have a history of IV drug use, and between 60 and 80% of IV drug users have Hepatitis C.