Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Roxys, slang for Roxicodone – a brand name for the generic oxycodone, is basically heroin in a pill form. It is an opioid, narcotic painkiller that is highly addictive. Roxys can be swallowed, smoked, crushed and snorted, or mixed with water and injected – all just like heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Social Acceptance

What makes roxys worse than heroin, in a way, is their social acceptance. Roxicodone and Roxicet are legal by prescription whereas heroin is a known illicit “street drug.” People who are prescribed roxys by their doctors are more likely to follow doctors’ orders without asking questions about the drug they are being given. Roxicodone is a powerfully potent narcotic that has the same incidence of addictiveness as heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Accessibility

Roxy is arguably worse than heroin because it is a lot more accessible than heroin. Whereas heroin is only available on the street, roxys can be found in many home medicine cabinets. More and more high school students and college students are taking painkillers like roxycodone because their parents or their friends’ parents leave their prescription bottles lying around. Also, people who they themselves have been prescribed roxys due to a legitimate condition with pain become hooked and can simply get their doctors to keep prescribing the painkillers. And, roxys like heroin can be bought “on the street,” too.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Physical Dependence

Roxys come in 15, 20, and 30 mg and it is said that a 30mg pill of Roxicodone or Roxicet is the equivalent to one bag of heroin but that is not a trusted way to compare the two, since heroin potency can vary from bag to bag and batch to batch.

The withdrawal from roxys and heroin can range from mild to severe, depending on how much and how long you have been taking either drug. Withdrawal symptoms usually begin six to 30 hours after last use and can be compared to flu-like in nature. People who are physically dependent on roxys or heroin will experience agitation, anxiety, muscle aches, watery eyes, insomnia, runny nose, sweating, and constant yawning when they suddenly stop using, or go cold turkey. Also, restless legs (and arms, neck, hands, and feet) also called “the jimmies,” anxiety, and depression are all part and parcel of opiate withdrawal. These symptoms are virtually the same for both roxy users and heroin users.

Some people say withdrawal from roxies is worse than heroin and other say that heroin withdrawal is worse. It really depends on the individual, how much they have been using, for how long, and the number of times they have gone cold turkey. Because, every time you “kick” is like a shock to the system and so each time gets worse and worse.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Overdose

Both heroin and roxys are a central nervous system depressant which means that, if you take too much, your breathing can be slowed to a halt. This is when overdose occurs. Many times, people simply fall asleep and stop breathing when they have taken too much of either drug. Heroin may be slightly worse than roxys in this capacity because its potency is never exactly known whereas, a 30mg roxy pill is always 30mg. But, people abusing roxys and heroin have the same tendency to overdo it, leading to tragic repercussions.

So, Are Roxys Worse than Heroin?

Basically, these drugs are one in the same and are both extremely potent and addictive. Because of their social acceptance and accessibility, it can be argued that roxys are worse than heroin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.drugsense.org/

http://alcoholism.about.com/

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

First of all, good luck. If you have never experienced opiate withdrawal symptoms, also called being dope sick, you are lucky. If you have, then you know what hell on earth feels like. And, if you have gone through opiate withdrawals more than once, you probably also have noticed that they get worse every subsequent time you stop or run out of your supply. This is because your body is going through a kind of shock: your brain has been altered by taking opiates (such as Oxycodone, Roxicet, heroin, etc.) and without these substances, your brain and therefore body go into panic mode.

Often times compared to being flu-like symptoms, opiate withdrawals are intense, acute, and although not life-threatening, it sure feels like you’re dying.

While going through opiate withdrawal, you may experience some or all of the following:

  • Agitation and anxiety
  • Depression
  • Muscle aches
  • Watery Eyes
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Runny nose
  • Restlessness
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Dilated pupils
  • Chills and goose bumps

Here are 10 things you can do to survive opiate withdrawal:

1. Prepare a comfortable environment:

Keep your tablet or TV and DVD player nearby so that you can watch some lighthearted movies.

Make sure that your room is at a comfortable temperature, and make sure that you have some soft blankets and maybe a fan. Prepare to change your sheets often because of sweating.

Wear loose and comfortable clothing. Again, you’ll probably have to change clothes a lot because of the sweating.

2. Avoid going through opiate withdrawal alone. If you don’t plan to check yourself into a rehab facility, then stay with someone who can support you during the withdrawal period.

3. Take some time off from your usual activities. Opiate withdrawal may take up to 2 weeks, so try to take some time off of work. If you have a family, then check yourself into a rehab facility or go somewhere where your children won’t have to see you going through opiate withdrawals.

4. Slowly taper off your narcotics. Reduce your doses of opioids or medications by about 20 to 25 percent every 2 or 3 days to minimize opiate withdrawals.

5. Try community detox. Check out your local methadone clinic so that you can gradually wean yourself off of narcotics by taking gradually decreasing doses of methadone. Community detox will allow you to go on with your daily life without checking in to an in-patient facility.

6. Go to a psychiatric ward or other inpatient psychiatric facility if you’ve had episodes of suicidal thoughts or hurting yourself in the past. Opiate withdrawal can bring out these negative behaviors, which could put you in real danger. If you have a history of depression or other psychiatric problems, then do your detox under medical supervision.

7. Check yourself into a rehabilitation facility.

Also called inpatient therapy, you will receive individual and group therapy and support. While you stay in a rehabilitation facility, you can talk to counselors about your addiction or you can spend time in support groups with other addicts.

8. Give yourself a lot of positive reinforcement. Try some of these strategies:

Tell yourself that your withdrawal pains from opiates are like labor pains. You’re giving birth to a new you.

Write a notice to yourself that says, “I’m a fantastic person, and I’m doing something amazing.” Post the notice where you can see it.

Give yourself a non-drug reward for every day that you make it through opiate withdrawal.

9. Remember to eat food and drink water. You may not feel like eating or drinking fluids, but your body needs nourishment and hydration. Eat saltines or yogurt or other foods that are easy on your stomach. Also, be sure to drink water or fruit juice to replace any fluids that you lose from vomiting or diarrhea.

10. Get some light exercise. Don’t overdo it, but take a short walk around your neighborhood or do some light housework. Exercise will keep your spirits up and will help to distract you from the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.wikihow.com/

http://www.health.harvard.edu/

Oxycodone Withdrawal Symptoms

Oxycodone Withdrawal Symptoms

Oxycodone withdrawal symptoms are described as some of the worst withdrawal symptoms in the opiate family. The reason for this is because oxycodone is a fast acting, short lasting medication for intense and chronic pain to help improve quality of life. Oxycodone is usually prescribed for those with cancer, and for those who have been in some sort of accident or have had some kind of surgery that leaves them in chronic pain.

Oxycodone was manufactured in Germany in 1916 and is a derivative of the drugs morphine and heroin. Oxycodone has many of the same effects as heroin and is just as addictive. It tends to be more socially accepted in comparison with heroin because it is a medication not an illicit drug. Some of the street names for oxycodone are “hillbilly heroin, blues, OC’s, Oxys, pills, OC 80’s”. Just as with heroin, oxycodone is extremely habit forming and you do not have to be taking the drug recreationally; you can also be prescribed oxycodone and become physically dependent.

Taking oxycodone regularly can cause you to build a tolerance as with most opiates. This is because oxycodone attaches itself to the opiate receptors in the brain causing a change in brain chemistry. This tolerance causes a user to need more and more oxycodone to continue getting the desired pain relieving effects or “high”.

A user who is taking oxycodone for recreational purposes is trying to achieve a “high” much like heroin. Oxycodone can be snorted, taken orally or injected. The effects of taking this drug recreationally can range from intense euphoria, drowsiness, all the way to hyperactivity. After a certain period of time, whether oxycodone has been taken recreationally or as prescribed; a user will become physically dependent. How long it takes to become physically dependent on oxycodone depends on the person, how much they have been taking and for what length of time they have been taking oxycodone. After a user becomes physically dependent on oxycodone, if they rapidly decrease their use or stop “cold turkey” they will inevitably experience oxycodone withdrawal symptoms. These oxycodone withdrawal symptoms can begin a few hours after stopping use and last weeks; this can vary from person to person. Oxycodone withdrawal symptoms are not fatal although they are very painful, extremely uncomfortable and frightening.

Here are some examples of what to expect from oxycodone withdrawal symptoms, these can vary and are not limited to:

  • Abnormal skin sensations
  • Aches and pains
  • Anxiety
  • Cold- or flu-like symptoms
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Goose bumps
  • Headaches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Mood swings
  • Nausea
  • Pain
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Rigid muscles
  • Runny nose
  • Seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there
  • Shivering or tremors
  • Sleeping difficulties
  • Sneezing
  • Sweating
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Vomiting

If a user is experiencing any of these oxycodone withdrawal symptoms they may think it’s a better idea to just continue using oxycodone rather than deal with the withdrawal symptoms. This leads to a longer period of habitual oxycodone use. It is recommended that a user who is experiencing any oxycodone withdrawal symptoms seek outside help from a medical detox or healthcare professional even though the symptoms are not fatal. There are medications now to ease the pain of oxycodone withdrawal and a medical detox will allow for the most comfortable oxycodone withdrawal that is available. Withdrawal from any drug is extremely frightening, so seek help.

How Being a Roxy Addict Can Ruin Your Life

How Being a Roxy Addict Can Ruin Your Life

How Being a Roxy Addict Can Ruin Your Life

When I was 24, my boyfriend introduced me to roxies. I was in graduate school so I was studying all the time and really stressed. One night when we were hanging out, he asked me if I wanted to try one. It wasn’t the first time I’d tried drugs. In high school, I was all about the hallucinogens: ecstasy and LSD, for the most part. In college, I drank heavily and did some coke. I’d even tried painkillers before- Vicodin or Percocet. However, I’d never had anything like roxies. He crushed up the little blue pill and gave me half to snort. Almost immediately, I felt light and happy. All my pain went away-physical and emotional. I wasn’t stressed about school anymore. I didn’t care about it, I didn’t care about anything. I felt free.

I started off just doing roxies on the weekends. I’d look forward to it all week long. On Fridays, I couldn’t wait to meet up with my boyfriend and get some of those little blue pills. I’d say to myself “Some people have a drink at the end of a long week, but I don’t really like alcohol, so this is what I do.” I was constantly chasing that feeling when I first used roxies; that high. I could never quite get there, even though I was doing more and more every time.

It wasn’t long until I wanted that relief during the week too. After I finished my studies, I’d snort roxies and just relax. No big deal. But my habit started to get expensive. I began to charge groceries and gas on credit cards so I could use all my cash for roxies. Each month, I’d just pay the minimum payment, so my debt began to grow.

I got frustrated when I couldn’t get as many pills as I wanted from my dealer. Each day I’d buy enough for the next couple, but I always ran out too soon. One day, my dealer asked if I wanted to go to a pill mill for him. These were basically shady doctors who would trade roxy prescriptions for cash. He said he’d pay for my first visit, pay for 100 roxies I was prescribed, and then I could keep going to the doctor on my own and keep all the roxies in the future. I ended up being prescribed 180 roxies on my first visit, so right off the bat I got to keep 80 pills for free.

I began doing roxies every day. I was no longer even getting high; I just needed the pills to feel normal. If I skipped a dose I’d get very very sick. I was going to the pill mill every month, and eventually was getting 210 pills a month. It didn’t matter; I would still run out before my next visit. I started going to multiple clinics.

Eventually, I lost everything to my roxy addiction. I was kicked out of school. When I couldn’t pay rent, I was evicted from my apartment. My credit cards got cancelled when I could no longer make a minimum payment. I ended up living in my car, waking up every morning wanting to die because of my withdrawal. One day while I was sweating and puking in a parking lot, a woman walked by. She looked at me with so much pity; I finally saw myself and what I was doing. I decided to get help.

Roxy Addict Withdrawal Options

If you are a Roxy addict and you want to get clean you probably have some fear about the withdrawal. This is normal and luckily there are options for you. The Roxy addict withdrawal options tend to be a wide range of medications used to make the cessation of Roxy use more comfortable for you. The medication options for those of you who may be addicted to Roxy’s can range from suboxone to clonidine.

Here are some of the Roxy addict withdrawal options for you to decide what might be best for you and your symptoms of Roxy withdrawal.

Suboxone as a Roxy addict withdrawal option is usually short term. Suboxone is adjusted to the lowest dose possible that suppresses the Roxy withdrawal symptoms and then slowly tapered down entirely until the Roxy addict is totally comfortable without any type of opiate.

Methadone as a Roxy addict withdrawal option is very similar to suboxone. Using methadone as a withdrawal option is using another opiate to help with opiate addiction. Many times methadone is used for long-term maintenance of Roxy addiction but it can be used to help with Roxy withdrawal symptoms. It is used much like suboxone. The lowest dose possible is given in order for the Roxy addict to feel little to no Roxy withdrawal symptoms. At that point the Roxy addict is slowly tapered off the methadone until they don’t need it anymore and can be comfortable without anything.

Clonidine as Roxy addict withdrawal option is marketed for the treatment of hypertension but works very well with helping in the treatment of withdrawal symptoms. Clonidine has an advantage over other medications because it is not an opiate. The use of Roxy’s can be immediately discontinued with this drug and it does not produce euphoria like suboxone or methadone. Clonidine helps with a lot of the symptoms of withdrawal from Roxy’s but it can’t help with muscle aches, insomnia, or drug cravings. That’s why most detoxes for Roxy’s will give out sleep medication along with clonidine.

Trazadone as one of the many Roxy addict withdrawal options for sleep is great. Trazadone helps with restless leg symptoms that happen during Roxy withdrawal and it also helps the Roxy addict sleep. As a Roxy addict who has tried to stop using knows, nighttime is worst for withdrawal symptoms. The mix of a sleep aid such as trazadone with a medication like clonidine can be very effective for those Roxy addicts that want to stop their habit once and for good.

Neurontin is known as a wonder drug for the symptoms of Roxy addict withdrawal. If you are looking at Neurontin for a Roxy addict withdrawal option you may be on the right path. Neurontin is meant to help with nerve pain and is not an opiate. Neurontin will get rid of most Roxy withdrawal symptoms including the dreaded headache, fatigue, and chills. This is not a medication that is recommended to be used for long term but to just help with the discomfort of Roxy withdrawal until the Roxy addict can then stop using everything.

There are multiple Roxy addict withdrawal options out there and what really matters is what your doctor decides is best for you. Everyone’s body handles medications differently and you should always seek out medical help if you want to stop using any type of opiate especially Roxy’s. While Roxy addict withdrawal may not be fatal it can be extremely uncomfortable and dangerous so it is best to seek the medical advice of a professional who can prescribe, safely, the right Roxy addict withdrawal options unique to you.

Roxy Withdrawal Length

Under prescribed dosage, roxys are an effective pain reliever, but when crushed and snorted or injected, the drug produces a quick and powerful “high” that some abusers compare to the feeling they get when doing heroin. Because roxy, like heroin and other opioids, is a central nervous system depressant and overdose can cause respiratory failure and death. Some symptoms of a roxy overdose include:

Usually if an individual is experiencing roxy overdose symptoms or taking them not as prescribed they are and have become addicted to roxys. The addiction of prescription pills has become a deadly epidemic worldwide. Roxycotin is a well-known narcotic pain killer. It is often referred to on the streets as roxy, roxies, blues, dum dums, blueberries, and smurfs. The active ingredient oxycodone in roxycontin is what makes this pain killer a highly addictive drug. Oxycodone is an opium derivative which causes addiction in the body and the brain. After excessive use of this drug or roxy use, your body stops producing the proper chemicals in your brain (dopamine & serotonin) because it relies on the roxy use for the chemical. With proper detoxification, it can take a recovering addict up to 3 years for the brain to start producing the proper levels of dopamine and serotonin for the body to feel normal again.

When going through a roxy withdrawal during, addicts may experience symptoms such as feelings of restlessness, vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, weakness, chills, sweating, depression, and increased heart rate, and craving roxys. If you have a problem with an addiction to Roxicodone  and think you may be addicted, you should get help as soon as possible because they can advise you how to stop using roxy’s. Although this drug is prescribed by doctors, it is a serious substance that can destroy your life and your health.

Roxy withdrawal symptoms can include more of but are not limited to:

Roxy withdrawal symptoms can begin as soon as six hours after the last dose and roxy withdrawal length can last up to one week. People who have gone through roxy withdrawal compare the process to the intensity of heroin withdrawal. Roxy withdrawal length is short when looked at how long it takes for the substance to leave your body but it takes a long time before you brain is producing the right chemicals and is back to normal after a long period of roxy use. This normalcy in the brain can take years to be reestablished. Roxy withdrawal length also just depends on the user and how much roxy they were using.

 

Roxy Withdrawal Symptoms

Roxy is the street name for the drug oxycodone. It is derived from the brand name of the medication, Roxicodone. Roxy pills generally come in 15 or 30 mg pills. It is an immediate release form of oxycodone, unlike the time-release form of the drug: OxyContin. Roxies are pure form of oxycodone; they do not contain ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or aspirin, like other oxycodone-containing products (i.e. Percodan, Percocet, and Tylox).

Roxy, or oxycodone, is a powerful, narcotic analgesic (painkiller). It is a semi-synthetic opioid. Roxy is generally prescribed for moderate to severe pain. In sufficient doses, oxycodone produces a feeling of euphoria.

Roxies are part of a highly addictive class of drugs. These drugs, known as opiods, mimic natural painkilling neurotransmitters in the brain, which is what creates the “high” when they are used. In response to long term use of opiates, the brain produces less of these substances, which causes roxy withdrawal to be very painful.

Roxy withdrawal results when a person becomes “tolerant” to roxies.  Tolerance is when the body adapts to regular drug use over a long period of time. Eventually, it takes more and more of the drug to produce the original effect. This is what happens to long term roxy users. Their bodies expect the pills. When roxy use is stopped or the dose is significantly reduced, the body reacts in a physical way. This is known as roxy withdrawal.

Withdrawal from roxies can cause a number of unpleasant symptoms. Common roxy withdrawal symptoms include extreme pain, tremors, muscle cramps, sweating, chills, rapid heartbeat, itching, restless leg syndrome, runny nose, sneezing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness. Withdrawal from roxies alone is not life-threatening, but it is extremely uncomfortable. Acute roxy withdrawal can last ten to fourteen days (depending on level of use.) Post-acute withdrawal from opiates lasts an indefinite amount of time, usually proportional to how long you have been abusing roxies. However, post-acute withdrawal from roxies is much less severe than acute roxy withdrawal and generally includes symptoms like insomnia, fatigue, and mild anxiety.

There are several medications on the market designed to treat acute roxy withdrawal symptoms. One of the most common medications is buprenorphine (brand name: Suboxone or Subutex). Buprenorphine has replaced methadone as the medication of choice to treat roxy withdrawal symptoms. This medication eliminates the worst of the acute roxy withdrawal symptoms. It is what is known as a long-acting, partial opiate receptor. It binds to the opiate receptors, but only activates them partially, whereas roxies are a full opiate receptor. The long half-life of buprenorphine reduces the risk of abuse.

Clonidine is another medication that is commonly used to treat roxy withdrawal symptoms. Clonidine mimics the hypotensive (blood pressure lowering) effects of roxies. It is helpful in treating common central nervous system roxy withdrawal symptoms like tachycardia (rapid heartbeat) and hypertension (high blood pressure). Clonidine also reduces sweating, hot and cold flushes, and general restlessness.

Benzodiazepines are another class of medications used to treat roxy withdrawal symptoms. Benzo’s are normally prescribed as anti-anxiety medications. These drugs can relieve symptoms of anxiety, restless leg syndrome, tremors, and insomnia.