Roxy, Oxy, and Opana

Roxy, Oxy, and Opana

Roxy, oxy and opana are pretty much the crème de la crème for opiate addicts. First it was oxy, then it was roxy, and more recently it has become opana. Opana abuse has increased recently because of the new formulation of roxy, oxy that keep users from being able to break down the pills and shoot them up. Roxy, oxy and opana are all very similar in their effects but roxy, oxy are essentially the same drug: oxycodone. Opana is oxymorphone.

Roxy, oxy and opana: Roxy, oxy

The active ingredient in roxy is oxycodone, so essentially roxy, oxy are one and the same. Oxycodone is also found in Percocet, OxyContin, OxyFast, etc. Some of these meds, such as roxy and oxy, are short acting, while OxyContin is a sustained release medication.

Oxy is an opiate medication prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. It bears much similarity to hydrocodone, which is most commonly known under the brand name Vicodin. However, oxycodone is believed to be more potent than hydrocodone, making it the drug of choice for many opiate abusers who take the drug for its euphoric effects. In high doses, it can cause shallow breathing, hypotension, circulatory collapse, respiratory arrest and death. Roxy is just one of the name brands of oxy.

Roxy, oxy and opana: Opana

The drug Opana, also known as Oxymorphone, is an opioid pain reliever which is similar to morphine. Reformulated OxyContin (oxy) pills make getting high harder, so opioid abusers are turning to Opana (oxymorphone) instead, according to a July 12, 2012, report in USA Today. As a result, the report added, Opana-related crime, including pharmacy robberies and overdose deaths, as well as treatment for oxymorphone addiction have been rising in several states.

Prior to August 2010, when Purdue Pharma reformulated OxyContin, opioid abusers could crush, break, or dissolve the pills in order to snort or inject the drug, which produces a more rapid high. The new formulation cannot be broken, crushed, or dissolved, so addicts must either take larger quantities of the drug or find another option. In Kentucky, according to USA Today, oxymorphone appeared as a factor in 23% of overdoses in 2011, up from just 2% in 2010. In nearby Ohio, the Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring Network reported in January 2012 that many opioid abusers said they were using oxymorphone as a replacement for oxy. This is not the first time oxymorphone abuse has been in the spotlight. According to a May 2011 intelligence brief from the Drug Enforcement Administration, oxymorphone abuse was popular during the early 1970s, when many who injected it considered it superior to heroin or morphine. The brief singled out New Castle, Delaware, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as present-day hot spots of oxymorphone abuse.

Other than a drug test, one can use the following symptoms to detect or roxy, oxy and opana abuse:

•Drowsiness, sometimes to the point of nodding off

•Sedation

•Euphoria

•Lightheadedness

•Itching

•Nausea and vomiting

•Constipation

•Low blood pressure

•Respiratory suppression

•Headache

•Dry mouth

•Sweating

Constricted pupils, although overdose may bring about dilated pupils.

Overdose deaths can occur due to respiratory suppression, especially when oxy, roxy, and opana or any opiate is combined with another drug that suppresses respiration, like another opiate, benzodiazepines or alcohol.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_difference_between_the_pain_medications_oxycodone_and_roxicodone

http://www.pharmacytimes.com/news/Reformulated-OxyContin-Leads-to-Increased-Opana-Abuse

Roxicodone Addiction in Women

Roxicodone Addiction in Women

Roxicodone is prescribed for the treatment of severe pain. The primary ingredient in Roxicodone is oxycodone which provides pain relief for extreme pain and also provides the individual with a sense of relaxation and euphoria. The pleasurable sensations of roxicodone are what causes them to cross the line between taking roxicodone and having a roxicodone addiction. Roxicodone can be chewed, injected, swallowed, or snorted.  Street names of roxicodone include roxi, roxies, Blue, Hillbilly Heroin, Kicker, and Poor Man’s Heroin.  Though roxicodone typically comes in the form of a pill, it can also be crushed up into a white powder or dissolved in water.

Roxicodone addiction in women is similar to roxicodone addiction for everyone else. In order to maintain a level of pain relief, relaxation, and euphoria that the woman has come to rely on, she must either increase how often she uses roxicodone or increase the amount she uses each time. In addition to this drug abuse a woman with a roxicodone addiction may also have some of the following symptoms such as:

  • A decrease in motivation
  • Irritable behavior
  • Irrational thoughts
  • Loss of energy
  • Increased sleepiness
  • Loss of appetite

Physical Effects – A roxicodone addiction can physically compromise the normal behaviors of the body by interfering with various mechanisms.  Here are some negative physical consequences resulting from using Roxicodone:

  • Dizziness or lack of stability
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dry mouth
  • Compromised mental function
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Liver damage
  • Death due to accidental overdose

Psychological Effects – A roxicodone addiction can also have negative impacts on mental health.  Here are some negative psychological and mental effects from abusing roxicodone:

  • Altered perception of reality
  • Personality shifts
  • Low self-esteem, negative body image
  • Feelings of anger, rage
  • Increased anxiety
  • Mood swings
  • Depression
  • Confusion, disorientation
  • Paranoia

Social Effects – The abuse of roxicodone can result in multiple negative social effects.  These can include the following:

  • Withdrawal, isolation from friends and family
  • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
  • Damaged relationships with loved ones
  • Division or brokenness within a family unit

The DEA reports that 1.9 million Americans have taken roxicodone for illicit use. The FDA reports that oxycodone played a role in 464 deaths across the United States in one year.

The issues and situations that contribute to a woman’s roxicodone addiction are different than those for men. There may be some genetic factors that are linked to roxicodone addiction in women, and this would be a biological reason for an addiction to roxicodone. But for roxicodone addiction and women it might also be an attempt to “numb” emotional pain caused from psychological trauma, feelings of anxiety or depression, or instances of abuse.  In these cases, these would be psychological causes of an addiction to roxicodone.  Finally, societal or environmental situations, such as the pressure of being a mother can increase the likelihood that woman might abuse roxicodone. 

The reasons behind roxicodone addiction in women are less important than how they can get help and luckily there are women’s treatment centers that can combat roxicodone addiction specifically in women with their unique issues.

 

 

http://www.michaelshouse.com/oxycodone-addiction/how-oxycodone-addiction-begins/

 

 

Roxicodone Addiction: Is Recovery Possible?

Roxicodone Addiction: Is Recovery Possible?

Roxicodone Addiction: Is Recovery Possible?

Two years ago, I was taking ten to twenty 30mg Roxy’s every day. I couldn’t get up in the morning without a dose, and I would begin to get sick in an hour if I wasn’t taking them around the clock. I kept lines of crushed up pills at my bedside so I could take some in the middle of the night if I woke up. I wasn’t even feeling the high anymore; I needed Roxies just to feel normal.

My addiction started when I was prescribed medication to treat legitimate pain. I had been in several car accidents and I couldn’t sit for long periods of time without shooting pain down my back and legs. I loved the way that Roxicodone made me feel. It took away my pain, gave me energy, and gave the whole world a glowy, happy look.

Over the years, my body became dependent on Roxicodone. I needed more and more just to feel the same way. When I didn’t have it, my pain became so intense that I would cry myself to sleep at night. I would feel nauseous, shaky, and anxious. I used to live and I lived to used. Roxicodone became my whole world; more important to me than my family, my job, and my friends. I didn’t think I would ever be able to live without it.

I had always thought that the key to my Roxicodone recovery was kicking the physical addiction. I thought once my body was no longer craving the drug, I’d be able to stay away. I’d go to detox and maybe a week or two in treatment, and think I was cured. It wouldn’t be long until I was right back to where I started from.

At one point, I even tried Suboxone maintenance. And, although the drug never got me high and it treated my cravings, it was never enough because I was still miserable. Eventually, I’d go off the Suboxone and seek out my drug of choice.

Today, I have been clean and sober for 18 months, so I can tell you that recovery from Roxicodone addiction is absolutely possible. It’s a process, and it’s not easy, but it is definitely worth it.

This time, I listened.

This time, I took suggestions.

This time, I was committed.

This time, I got a sponsor, went to meetings, and worked a 12 step program.

I used to think that having a Roxicodone addiction was the worst thing that could have ever happened to me. I would’ve given anything to not have this disease. Today, I am nothing but grateful for the process. I got a second chance to be a better person, and through that, I have been given a life that is beyond my wildest dreams. I walked in looking for a way to recover from my Roxicodone addiction, and I walked out with so much more. I can tell you all day what a blessing this journey has been, but until you experience it yourself, you won’t truly understand. What I can tell you is that recovery is absolutely possible.

Signs of Roxy Addiction

Signs of Roxy Addiction

Signs of Roxy Addiction

There may come a point where you wonder if you or someone you love is addicted to roxies. “Roxy” is the street name for the drug oxycodone, which is a prescription narcotic painkiller. It is classified as an opiate, like heroin or morphine.

Signs of Roxy Addiction: You

If you have been taking roxies and are wondering if you may be addicted, here are some signs of roxy addiction:

  • Constantly thinking about roxies
  • Obtaining multiple prescriptions for oxycodone
  • Feeling pain when the drug is not available
  • Flu-like symptoms when you try to stop using roxies
  • Restless thoughts or behaviors
  • Lying or stealing to obtain more roxies
  • Using roxies in secret
  • Hiding roxies around the house

Signs of Roxy Addiction: Loved one

If you suspect a friend or family member is addicted to roxies, there are some signs of roxy addiction you can look out to. The physical signs are usually specific to the class of drugs. Someone who is taking roxies or using heroin, for example, will act differently than someone who is abusing cocaine or amphetamines. However, behavioral signs of addiction are similar no matter what drugs are abused.

Signs of Roxy Addiction: Loved one: Physical

  • Pinpoint pupils: Roxy use makes the pupils constrict unnaturally. Normally the pupil dilates or constricts depending on the light in the room. When a person is on roxies, their pupil stays small no matter what. Likewise, when a person is withdrawing from roxies, their pupil will dilate unnaturally.
  • Unsteady gait
  • Changes in sleep patterns
  • Nodding out: Nodding refers to people on opiates when they are in a state between sleep and waking. They may close their eyes and their head may droop while having a conversation or standing. They may catch themselves and wake up at this point or lose consciousness completely.
  • Sudden weight loss
  • Slurred words
  • Constipation
  • Nausea and/or Vomiting
  • Sweating
  • Withdrawal: If a person is unable to get his (or her) usual dose of oxycodone, they will begin to suffer from withdrawal symptoms. He will be restless, agitated and sweaty. He’ll suffer from muscle and bone pain, depression, diarrhea, chills, insomnia, vomiting and nausea.
  • Track marks: Some roxy abusers crush up the pills and inject them. Track marks may look like cat scratches that never seem to go away and grow within a short period of time.

Signs of Roxy Addiction: Loved one: Behavioral

  • Lying about roxy use
  • Using roxies without a prescription
  • Using roxies in other than pill form: Some people are prescribed to roxies for legitimate pain. If they take them exactly as prescribed and in the correct dose, they may not become addicted. However, even a legitimate prescription can lead to addiction if the person takes more than they are supposed to, for a longer period of time, and begins crushing the pills to snort if, inject it, or swallow the powder.
  • Stealing money, medication, or other items of value
  • Sudden mood swings
  • Visiting multiple doctors for the same problem
  • Isolating
  • Losing interest in things they used to enjoy
  • Hanging out with people who use roxies
  • Missing work or school
  • Unexplained financial or legal problems
  • Compulsive behavior
  • Drug craving
  • Depression

How Being a Roxy Addict Can Ruin Your Life

How Being a Roxy Addict Can Ruin Your Life

How Being a Roxy Addict Can Ruin Your Life

When I was 24, my boyfriend introduced me to roxies. I was in graduate school so I was studying all the time and really stressed. One night when we were hanging out, he asked me if I wanted to try one. It wasn’t the first time I’d tried drugs. In high school, I was all about the hallucinogens: ecstasy and LSD, for the most part. In college, I drank heavily and did some coke. I’d even tried painkillers before- Vicodin or Percocet. However, I’d never had anything like roxies. He crushed up the little blue pill and gave me half to snort. Almost immediately, I felt light and happy. All my pain went away-physical and emotional. I wasn’t stressed about school anymore. I didn’t care about it, I didn’t care about anything. I felt free.

I started off just doing roxies on the weekends. I’d look forward to it all week long. On Fridays, I couldn’t wait to meet up with my boyfriend and get some of those little blue pills. I’d say to myself “Some people have a drink at the end of a long week, but I don’t really like alcohol, so this is what I do.” I was constantly chasing that feeling when I first used roxies; that high. I could never quite get there, even though I was doing more and more every time.

It wasn’t long until I wanted that relief during the week too. After I finished my studies, I’d snort roxies and just relax. No big deal. But my habit started to get expensive. I began to charge groceries and gas on credit cards so I could use all my cash for roxies. Each month, I’d just pay the minimum payment, so my debt began to grow.

I got frustrated when I couldn’t get as many pills as I wanted from my dealer. Each day I’d buy enough for the next couple, but I always ran out too soon. One day, my dealer asked if I wanted to go to a pill mill for him. These were basically shady doctors who would trade roxy prescriptions for cash. He said he’d pay for my first visit, pay for 100 roxies I was prescribed, and then I could keep going to the doctor on my own and keep all the roxies in the future. I ended up being prescribed 180 roxies on my first visit, so right off the bat I got to keep 80 pills for free.

I began doing roxies every day. I was no longer even getting high; I just needed the pills to feel normal. If I skipped a dose I’d get very very sick. I was going to the pill mill every month, and eventually was getting 210 pills a month. It didn’t matter; I would still run out before my next visit. I started going to multiple clinics.

Eventually, I lost everything to my roxy addiction. I was kicked out of school. When I couldn’t pay rent, I was evicted from my apartment. My credit cards got cancelled when I could no longer make a minimum payment. I ended up living in my car, waking up every morning wanting to die because of my withdrawal. One day while I was sweating and puking in a parking lot, a woman walked by. She looked at me with so much pity; I finally saw myself and what I was doing. I decided to get help.

Roxy Side Effects

Roxy Side Effects

Roxy is the street name for the powerful prescription narcotic, oxycodone (brand name Roxicodone). Roxies are synthesized from thebaine, a derivative of the opium plant, and are used in medical settings to treat moderate to severe pain. Roxies are also very commonly abused in the United States, mainly for the euphoric effect of this class of drugs. They are classified as opiates, just like heroin and Vicoden, and are highly addictive.

Roxy Side Effects: Central Nervous System

1.) Euphoria: Roxies have a number of central nervous system side effects. One of them is the feeling of euphoria that causes so many to abuse roxies.

2.) Respiratory Depression: Roxies also cause respiratory depression by the effect they have on the brain stem. Many times, death due to roxy abuse is due to this side effect.

3.) Cough suppression: Opiates like roxies are often included in prescription cough medications because of this roxy side effect. It directly affects the cough reflex in the medulla.

4.) Pinpoint pupils: Roxies cause the pupil to constrict. Normally, a person’s pupil changes size depending on the amount of light in the room (expanding in low light and constricting in bright light). However, when a person is using roxies, their pupil stays small no matter what. Even when a person becomes tolerant to roxies as a result of prolonged use, they will still display this physical sign when they ingest a roxy.

5.) Nodding out: This term refers to the main central nervous system roxy side effect.  Roxies are a central nervous system depressant (a “downer”), so people are less alert and seem sleepy. Nodding refers to people on opiates when they are in a state between sleep and waking. They may close their eyes and their head may droop while having a conversation or standing. They may catch themselves and wake up at this point or lose consciousness completely.  

Roxy Side Effects: GI and Smooth Muscle

1.) Nausea and vomiting: Roxy side effects include this sometimes powerful effect on the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Many first time users of roxy vomit or get nauseous, particularly if roxy is taken on an empty stomach. This is because roxy directly triggers chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ) (aka the vomit center) located in the medulla.

2.) Constipation and slowed digestion: Roxy decreases the production of acid in the stomach so digestion is slowed, and it also decreases muscle action in the colon resulting in constipation.

Roxy Side Effects: Cardiovascular

1.) Peripheral vasodilatation- Roxy causes the peripheral blood vessels to dilate, causing blood pressure to drop. This roxy side effect is responsible for the feeling of lightheadedness that comes along with roxy use. It can also cause flushing, red eyes, or sweating, which are common roxy side effects.

Roxy side effects vary from person and depend on a number of things including age and physical condition of the person taking roxies, the dose, whether the person is tolerant to roxies, etc. Roxy side effects can be made worse if a person takes them with other central nervous system depressants like benzos or alcohol.