How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

First of all, good luck. If you have never experienced opiate withdrawal symptoms, also called being dope sick, you are lucky. If you have, then you know what hell on earth feels like. And, if you have gone through opiate withdrawals more than once, you probably also have noticed that they get worse every subsequent time you stop or run out of your supply. This is because your body is going through a kind of shock: your brain has been altered by taking opiates (such as Oxycodone, Roxicet, heroin, etc.) and without these substances, your brain and therefore body go into panic mode.

Often times compared to being flu-like symptoms, opiate withdrawals are intense, acute, and although not life-threatening, it sure feels like you’re dying.

While going through opiate withdrawal, you may experience some or all of the following:

  • Agitation and anxiety
  • Depression
  • Muscle aches
  • Watery Eyes
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Runny nose
  • Restlessness
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Dilated pupils
  • Chills and goose bumps

Here are 10 things you can do to survive opiate withdrawal:

1. Prepare a comfortable environment:

Keep your tablet or TV and DVD player nearby so that you can watch some lighthearted movies.

Make sure that your room is at a comfortable temperature, and make sure that you have some soft blankets and maybe a fan. Prepare to change your sheets often because of sweating.

Wear loose and comfortable clothing. Again, you’ll probably have to change clothes a lot because of the sweating.

2. Avoid going through opiate withdrawal alone. If you don’t plan to check yourself into a rehab facility, then stay with someone who can support you during the withdrawal period.

3. Take some time off from your usual activities. Opiate withdrawal may take up to 2 weeks, so try to take some time off of work. If you have a family, then check yourself into a rehab facility or go somewhere where your children won’t have to see you going through opiate withdrawals.

4. Slowly taper off your narcotics. Reduce your doses of opioids or medications by about 20 to 25 percent every 2 or 3 days to minimize opiate withdrawals.

5. Try community detox. Check out your local methadone clinic so that you can gradually wean yourself off of narcotics by taking gradually decreasing doses of methadone. Community detox will allow you to go on with your daily life without checking in to an in-patient facility.

6. Go to a psychiatric ward or other inpatient psychiatric facility if you’ve had episodes of suicidal thoughts or hurting yourself in the past. Opiate withdrawal can bring out these negative behaviors, which could put you in real danger. If you have a history of depression or other psychiatric problems, then do your detox under medical supervision.

7. Check yourself into a rehabilitation facility.

Also called inpatient therapy, you will receive individual and group therapy and support. While you stay in a rehabilitation facility, you can talk to counselors about your addiction or you can spend time in support groups with other addicts.

8. Give yourself a lot of positive reinforcement. Try some of these strategies:

Tell yourself that your withdrawal pains from opiates are like labor pains. You’re giving birth to a new you.

Write a notice to yourself that says, “I’m a fantastic person, and I’m doing something amazing.” Post the notice where you can see it.

Give yourself a non-drug reward for every day that you make it through opiate withdrawal.

9. Remember to eat food and drink water. You may not feel like eating or drinking fluids, but your body needs nourishment and hydration. Eat saltines or yogurt or other foods that are easy on your stomach. Also, be sure to drink water or fruit juice to replace any fluids that you lose from vomiting or diarrhea.

10. Get some light exercise. Don’t overdo it, but take a short walk around your neighborhood or do some light housework. Exercise will keep your spirits up and will help to distract you from the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.wikihow.com/

http://www.health.harvard.edu/

What are Roxy pills?

roxy pills

A Roxy pill, or Roxicodone, is a brand name for the generic drug, Oxycodone. It is a narcotic painkiller. Roxicodone pills are also called Roxy pills, Roxy’s, Roxies (or any variation of spelling), blueberries, blues, 30s (for the 30 milligram strength).

Roxy pills are currently among the most abused drugs. Statistics show that Roxy pills and other narcotics like it are mostly abused by people ranging from 16 to 49 years old with some as young as 12 years old having at least tried one of these painkillers in a recreational way. Painkillers like Roxy pills are becoming the first go-to drug for recreational use, being “experimented with” even before marijuana and cocaine.

Roxy pills are pure opioid (synthetically produced opiate), meaning they do not contain aspirin or Tylenol like other narcotics of the same drug classification. Roxy pills are a Schedule II drug. Other drugs in this class include Methadone, Oxycodone (Percocet), Hydrocodone (Vicodin) and many, many others. There are a few different pills that are narcotic pain killers in pill form. There is Roxicet, also called Tylox, Roxanol (also called Morphine), Roxicodone (Percocet without the Tylenol). Anyone of these narcotic pain killers are strong, require a prescription, and could be called “Roxie.” These drugs are prescribed for moderate to severe pain.

Side effects while taking Roxy pills include respiratory depression, meaning breathing is slowed or may even stop if overdose occurs; hypotension, or low blood pressure; sweating; anxiety; sleepiness; itchiness; urinary difficulty/urinary tract infection; physical dependence; loss of appetite; dizziness; dry mouth; headaches and migraines.

And because of their potency, many people abuse Roxy pills for the euphoric “high” they experience. The ways in which Roxy pills are abused include being eaten (slang for swallowed), snorted/sniffed, smoked (as in free-based), slammed/banged/shot (slang terms for injected).

Signs of use and abuse of Roxy pills include “doctor shopping” and having multiple prescriptions; raiding medicine cabinets, medications going missing; always out of money; irritability; “pinned” pupils; agitated or restless behaviors; secretive behaviors such as hiding medications, isolation, and withdrawal from social activities; extreme and/or rapid weight loss.

Signs and outcome of overdose of Roxy pills include seizures, slowed or cessation of breath, hospitalization, coma, and death.

Those who take Roxy pills long term and suddenly stop will more than likely experience opioid abstinence syndrome, or simply “(the) withdrawals:” extreme flu-like symptoms such as sweats/night sweats, chills, diarrhea, vomiting, and body aches. In addition, people going through withdrawals from Roxy pills experience runny nose, sneezing, yawning, goose bumps, insomnia, restless limbs (aka “the
jerks,” “the jimmies”), and lethargy. As if these were not bad enough, withdrawal from Roxy pills also involves psychological symptoms including (increased) anxiety and depression, irritability, mood swings, and an overall extreme lack of will to do anything, including self-care like brushing your teeth and showering. Basically hell on earth. I always knew that the dreaded withdrawal onslaught from Roxy pills was coming when I’d wake up with what I called “dewy eyes” – during the night, my night sweats would have begun and that sweat would then pool in the corners of my eyes. When I awoke in this way, it only took a few minutes for the full-on effect of the withdrawals to begin. Worst.feeling.ever.

Sources:

www.detoxanswers.com

www.wiki.answers.com

www.wikipedia.org

www.nih.gov

www.prescriptiondrugabuse.org

What to expect from detoxing from Roxies at home

What to expect from detoxing from Roxies at home

“Roxy” is the street name for the drug oxycodone. Oxycodone can be found in a number of different prescription meds, but the name roxy is usually reserved for pure, short-acting forms of oxycodone.

Roxies are opiates. They are of the same class of drugs as heroin and morphine. These drugs are highly physically addictive. Frequent use can quickly develop into tolerance (needing more and more of the drug to achieve the same results). Once you are tolerant of a drug, your body expects the drug, so when you stop or reduce your dose, you can experience withdrawal. Roxy withdrawal is pretty nasty. You won’t die from it, but you may wish you were dead.

What to expect from detoxing from Roxies at home: What is detox?

Detox is the process of controlling withdrawal from roxies (or any other addictive substance) and lessening the physical effects of purging the body of addictive substances. There are medical facilities that deal exclusively with the detox process. They have highly trained medical staff and can administer medications to manage the symptoms of roxy withdrawal. Whenever possible, I HIGHLY recommend going to a detox facility when you are trying to get off roxies. Detox facilities are the most safe and comfortable way to go. For those who can’t afford it or just don’t want to go, you may want to know what to expect from detoxing from roxies at home.

What to expect from detoxing from Roxies at home: Withdrawal Symptoms

Withdrawal from Roxies can cause a number of unpleasant symptoms. When you are detoxing from Roxies at home, expect to have symptoms that can include extreme pain, tremors, muscle cramps, sweating, chills, rapid heartbeat, itching, restless leg syndrome, runny nose, sneezing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness. Withdrawal from oxycodone alone is not life-threatening, but it is extremely uncomfortable. Acute oxycodone withdrawal can last ten to fourteen days (depending on level of use.) Post-acute withdrawal from oxycodone lasts an indefinite amount of time, usually proportional to how long you have been abusing oxycodone. However, post-acute withdrawal from oxycodone is much less severe than acute oxycodone withdrawal and generally includes symptoms like insomnia, fatigue, and mild anxiety.

What to expect from detoxing from Roxies at home: How to prepare

If you are going to be detoxing from Roxies at home, it’s good to do some preparation beforehand. If you can go to a doctor and get a prescription to benzodiazepines (just for the length of the detox) and/or the drug Buprenorphine, you will have a much more comfortable detox. These drugs are used in detox facilities and some doctors will prescribe them if you are detoxing from roxies at home. You should have access to hot showers or baths or a hot tub, and drink plenty of fluids when you are detoxing from roxies at home. Vitamins and easy to digest foods are also a must. Imodium is a good over-the-counter drug to buy when you are detoxing from roxies at home, as is a sleep aid if you can’t get benzodiazepines.

Why Should I Stop Using Roxies?

Roxy is the street name for the prescription drug oxycodone. It usually refers to the pure, immediate release form of oxycodone. However, there are several drugs which combine oxycodone with anti-inflammatory medications. In certain circumstances, these drugs may mistakenly be called “roxies.”

The name “roxy” was derived from the brand name “Roxicodone,” which is pure, immediate release oxycodone. It comes in 15mg or 30mg tablets. However, there is another brand name drug, “Roxicet,” which is sometimes mistaken for roxy because of the similarity of the name. Roxicet is oxycodone plus acetaminophen (Tylenol), the same formulation as Percocet. Other oxycodone containing formulations are combined with ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or aspirin.

Roxies are very highly addictive. One of the reasons you should stop using roxies is this addiction potential. Roxies are in the same class of drugs as heroin. They stimulate the same reaction in your brain. They are classified as opiates.

Opiates are both physically and psychologically addicting. Almost no other class of drug has the high physical addiction potential of opiates. Even with occasional or short term use, you can experience withdrawal symptoms when you don’t use them or reduce your dose. You should stop using roxies because the physical withdrawal symptoms can be miserable. While you can’t die from roxy withdrawal alone, you will wish you would. Common roxy withdrawal symptoms include extreme pain, tremors, muscle cramps, sweating, chills, rapid heartbeat, itching, restless leg syndrome, runny nose, sneezing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness.

Another reason you should stop using roxies is that it is highly illegal to possess them without a prescription and law enforcement officials are cracking down. Roxies are a schedule II narcotic, which is the most highly regulated class of prescription drugs. In some states, you can get five to twenty years in prison for possession of roxies without a prescription. Even those with a prescription face legal consequences if they are caught with a bottle that has fewer pills than it should if they were taking it as prescribed.

Law enforcement officials are cracking down because of the “opiate epidemic” that is sweeping the nation. Abuse of prescription narcotics in the US over the last 10 years has skyrocketed. Opiate addicted infants have replaced the “crack” babies of the 1980’s as the newest nightmare for neonatal doctors around the country, and overdoses from opiates like roxies are more common than car accidents. You should stop using roxies because it’s dangerous! Roxies suppress your respiratory system, and overdose deaths are extremely common.

If you want to stop using roxies, you should talk to your healthcare provider or local addiction treatment center. If you are physically addicted to roxies, they will be able to provide you with medication that can alleviate the symptoms of withdrawal while you stop using roxies. They can also help you find support that will help you stop using roxies, because it isn’t always easy. If you are not physically addicted, and you are able to stop using roxies and stay stopped, do it now before you face withdrawal, prison, or overdose.