The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

When determining which drugs are the hardest drugs to kick, it is helpful to see which the most addictive drugs are. These two concepts are pretty much synonymous. This is because rate of dependence and severity of withdrawal symptoms have everything to do with trying to kick a nasty drug habit.

The following is a list of the 5 hardest drugs to kick, from least to greatest in difficulty. This list is based on a study put together by Dutch scientists who replicated a London study and devised a “dependency rating” that measures addictive potency of the biggest drugs out there. The scale of 0-to-3 shows how the hardest drugs to kick measure up.

#5 Crystal Meth 2.24

What makes crystal meth one of the hardest drugs to kick is that, like heroin and nicotine, meth also imitates dopamine, the reward chemical, and norepinephrine, the alertness chemical, causing your neurons to release more of both—all the while training your brain to want them more. But meth takes it a step further; it can damage dopamine- and norepinephrine-releasing neurons, which leads to a drastic decrease in their production, which makes you crave meth even more.

#4 Methadone 2.68

Basically legalized heroin, methadone is highly addictive because the way it works and is used as a treatment for heroin addiction is to build dependence. And in the case of methadone, dependence is the same as addiction.

Now, it is debatable whether methadone belongs at #4 on the list of hardest drugs to kick because, in my personal experience and from others who have shared their methadone experiences with me, I find it to be a much nastier drug to kick than heroin.

The withdrawals are hell on earth. Heroin withdrawal is said to be more acute but lasts for a much shorter period of time, about a week depending on usage and your body chemistry. Methadone withdrawal is really just as bad when it comes to the severity of the symptoms. What makes methadone harder to kick than heroin is that the withdrawal symptoms last for a longer period of time. And I mean a lot longer. For me it was about a month and a half before I started to feel normal again. Some people experience methadone withdrawal for even longer than that. Because of this, many people return to their drug use to feel better again, making methadone one of the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

#3 Nicotine 2.82

Nicotine mimics chemicals that stimulate the “reward system” in the brain and then actually replaces them. Nicotine addiction occurs because this replacement causes your brain to make less of the naturally occurring good stuff and so the brain now needs nicotine to maintain normal functioning.

Statistics don’t lie: nicotine proves to be one of the hardest drugs to kick by the sheer number of nicotine addicts in the US: 50,000,000; and one in every five deaths nationwide are the result of smoking.

And actually, there is a tie for spots 2 and 3 which many may find surprising. That’s right, the study found that nicotine is just as hard to kick as crack cocaine.

#2 Crack Cocaine 2.82

Although crack is comprised of cocaine, smoking processed crack causes a faster, higher rush that lasts for less time than powder coke. The intensity of the crack high combined with the efficient method of use—smoking—are the big reasons why crack is number two in the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

Crack addiction is dramatically higher than that of snorted cocaine powder. In 2010, there were an estimated 500,000 active crack cocaine addicts in the United States. And although not physical in nature, the psychological withdrawal symptoms from crack are intense and terrifying: hallucinations, severe anxiety, and depression.

#1 Heroin 2.89

Again, statistics show how heroin is one of the hardest drugs to kick. In the US in 2003, an estimated 281,000 people sought treatment for heroin addiction, and according to the National Institute on Drug Addiction, 23% of people who try heroin become full on addicts.

Heroin is easy to get hooked on. It reduces pain while at the same time causes pleasure. Who wouldn’t want to feel this way? By injecting, snorting or smoking heroin, you are training your brain to make you crave it. After you are physically dependent on heroin, the nasty withdrawal symptoms are enough to keep you coming back for more. It’s clear that heroin is the hardest drug to kick once you’re hooked on it.

 Honorable Mention(s):

Alcohol and Benzodiazepines

Both alcohol and benzos (such as Valium and Xanax) are also some of the hardest drugs to kick because the withdrawal symptoms that result from trying to kick cold turkey are very intense and even possibly fatal. People who stop using alcohol and benzos can experience hallucinations, sweats, anxiety, tremors, seizures, cardiac arrest and even death as a result of these symptoms.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.alternet.org/

http://www.thefix.com/

http://www.drugabuse.gov/

What are Roxy pills?

roxy pills

A Roxy pill, or Roxicodone, is a brand name for the generic drug, Oxycodone. It is a narcotic painkiller. Roxicodone pills are also called Roxy pills, Roxy’s, Roxies (or any variation of spelling), blueberries, blues, 30s (for the 30 milligram strength).

Roxy pills are currently among the most abused drugs. Statistics show that Roxy pills and other narcotics like it are mostly abused by people ranging from 16 to 49 years old with some as young as 12 years old having at least tried one of these painkillers in a recreational way. Painkillers like Roxy pills are becoming the first go-to drug for recreational use, being “experimented with” even before marijuana and cocaine.

Roxy pills are pure opioid (synthetically produced opiate), meaning they do not contain aspirin or Tylenol like other narcotics of the same drug classification. Roxy pills are a Schedule II drug. Other drugs in this class include Methadone, Oxycodone (Percocet), Hydrocodone (Vicodin) and many, many others. There are a few different pills that are narcotic pain killers in pill form. There is Roxicet, also called Tylox, Roxanol (also called Morphine), Roxicodone (Percocet without the Tylenol). Anyone of these narcotic pain killers are strong, require a prescription, and could be called “Roxie.” These drugs are prescribed for moderate to severe pain.

Side effects while taking Roxy pills include respiratory depression, meaning breathing is slowed or may even stop if overdose occurs; hypotension, or low blood pressure; sweating; anxiety; sleepiness; itchiness; urinary difficulty/urinary tract infection; physical dependence; loss of appetite; dizziness; dry mouth; headaches and migraines.

And because of their potency, many people abuse Roxy pills for the euphoric “high” they experience. The ways in which Roxy pills are abused include being eaten (slang for swallowed), snorted/sniffed, smoked (as in free-based), slammed/banged/shot (slang terms for injected).

Signs of use and abuse of Roxy pills include “doctor shopping” and having multiple prescriptions; raiding medicine cabinets, medications going missing; always out of money; irritability; “pinned” pupils; agitated or restless behaviors; secretive behaviors such as hiding medications, isolation, and withdrawal from social activities; extreme and/or rapid weight loss.

Signs and outcome of overdose of Roxy pills include seizures, slowed or cessation of breath, hospitalization, coma, and death.

Those who take Roxy pills long term and suddenly stop will more than likely experience opioid abstinence syndrome, or simply “(the) withdrawals:” extreme flu-like symptoms such as sweats/night sweats, chills, diarrhea, vomiting, and body aches. In addition, people going through withdrawals from Roxy pills experience runny nose, sneezing, yawning, goose bumps, insomnia, restless limbs (aka “the
jerks,” “the jimmies”), and lethargy. As if these were not bad enough, withdrawal from Roxy pills also involves psychological symptoms including (increased) anxiety and depression, irritability, mood swings, and an overall extreme lack of will to do anything, including self-care like brushing your teeth and showering. Basically hell on earth. I always knew that the dreaded withdrawal onslaught from Roxy pills was coming when I’d wake up with what I called “dewy eyes” – during the night, my night sweats would have begun and that sweat would then pool in the corners of my eyes. When I awoke in this way, it only took a few minutes for the full-on effect of the withdrawals to begin. Worst.feeling.ever.

Sources:

www.detoxanswers.com

www.wiki.answers.com

www.wikipedia.org

www.nih.gov

www.prescriptiondrugabuse.org

Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms

Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms           

Methadone is a synthetic opioid used for the maintenance of patients with opiate addiction.  Methadone is mainly used in the involvement of stopping or reducing the use of illicit drugs such as heroin and morphine although it also used in the treatment of chronic pain. While this is the case it has been found to be used recreationally for those with opiate addiction.

Methadone addiction is common because it is readily and easily available at methadone clinics. Clinics are where a user may go for the maintenance of their illicit opiate addiction. There they will receive methadone doses for a small payment each day legally. Just because methadone is legal whereas heroin is not, does not mean it is any less addictive or dangerous. The death toll from methadone use has spiked upward dramatically since 1999, with there being about 3,849 known in 2004 compared to 790 in 1999. Mixing methadone with other drugs such as benzodiazepines can be extremely dangerous also.

Methadone is highly physically addictive just as any other opiate. Methadone’s effects can last up to 35 hours and can remain in the body for days. This makes it prime for the maintenance of opiate addiction but also extremely hard to quit. That’s because when stopping methadone use there are going to be methadone withdrawal symptoms. The physical changes in the body after using methadone for a period of time are similar to those when using heroin or any other opiates.

To know if you are going to have methadone withdrawal symptoms, you can look for signs of methadone addiction. Signs of methadone addiction are pinpointed or contracted pupils, drowsiness, constipation, and suppressed breathing or cough reflex. If you or someone you know has been taking methadone for a long period of time and has these signs they most likely are going to go through methadone withdrawal symptoms once they stop their methadone use. Methadone withdrawal symptoms are extremely uncomfortable and while they are not fatal it is very frightening. It can become psychologically as well as physically painful. Methadone withdrawal symptoms can vary based on age, gender, how much or how little you have been using and usually consist of;

  • Physical Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms:
  • Lightheadedness
  • Tearing
  • Runny nose
  • Yawning
  • Sneezing
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Severe Itching
  • Fever
  • Sweating
  • Chills
  • Tremors
  • Aches and pains, often in the joints and/or legs
  • Elevated pain sensitivity
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Reduced breathing (may be fatal between 2–4 hours)

 

  • Psychological Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms:
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Susceptibility to Cravings
  • Depression
  • Prolonged insomnia
  • Delirium
  • Auditory hallucinations
  • Visual hallucinations
  • Increased perception of odors, real or imagined
  • Marked decrease in sex drive
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Panic disorder
  • Paranoia
  • Delusions

Methadone withdrawal symptoms have shown to be up to twice as severe as those of morphine or heroin and are last a significant more amount of time; methadone withdrawal symptoms can last for several weeks or more. At high methadone doses, sudden cessation of therapy can result in methadone withdrawal symptoms described as “the worst withdrawal imaginable,” lasting from weeks to months.

 

 

 

Methadone Maintenance Program Pro’ss and Con’s

Methadone Treatments

Methadone maintenance programs are highly controversial. On the one hand, methadone maintenance programs have proven effective in reducing drug-related crime and overdoses in urban areas. On the other, many experts contend that methadone maintenance programs are simply replacing one addiction with another and that they do very little to treat the primary problem.

Methadone is a synthetic agent that works by “occupying” the brain receptor sites affected by heroin and other opiates. Unlike most opiates that are abused, it has long-acting effects, therefore, once a person gets used to the dose, it will cause less euphoria. Also, if a short term opiate is used while on methadone, it will block the effects.

Methadone Maintenance Programs: Pros

  • Reduced or stopped use of injection drugs.
  • Reduced risk of overdose and of acquiring and transmitting disease such as HIV, hepatitis B or C, bacterial infections, endocarditis, soft tissue infections, thrombophlebitis, tuberculosis, and STD’s.
  • Reduced mortality. The median death rate of opiate-dependent individuals in methadone maintenance programs is 30 percent of the rate of those not in a program.
  • Possible reduction in sexual risk behaviors, although evidence is conflicting.
  • Reduced criminal activity.
  • Improved family stability and employment potential.
  • Improved pregnancy outcomes.

Methadone Maintenance Programs: Cons

  • Methadone maintenance programs are a corrective, not a curative treatment for heroin and other opiate addiction.
  • Studies have shown that good outcomes are based on a treatment length on one year or more, but most patients in methadone maintenance programs leave before one year either because they drop out, the clinic encourages them to leave, or they are discharged for not complying.
  • Most methadone maintenance program patients continue using other drugs like heroin, cocaine, and alcohol after admission.
  • Methadone maintenance programs do not address any of the underlying issues behind drug use.
  • Methadone maintenance programs merely substitute one addiction for the other.
  • When a person tries to get off of methadone, they usually experience terrible, even life-threatening, withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal can last significantly longer on methadone than withdrawal from heroin and other opiates. It can take several months.
  • Methadone itself can be a highly unstable drug, and even though it shows less mortality than heroin, there is still a relatively high risk for overdose, especially when methadone is combined with other drugs.
  • Methadone maintenance programs enforce significant restrictions, designed to prevent abuse, so most patients must go to the clinic every day or several times a week to receive their medication. This can create problems for patients who need to travel, work or arrange childcare. It can also expose people to the risk of employment discrimination, because asking for time off to visit a methadone clinic is still highly stigmatized in the working world.
  • Methadone can cause unwanted and sometimes intolerable side effects like weight gain and irritability.
  • Methadone also shows up in urine drug testing for employment, so a person in a methadone maintenance program may have to disclose this before getting a job.

Some people stay on methadone maintenance programs for decades, some forever.

Source:

http://www.cdc.gov/idu/facts/methadonefin.pdf