Black Tar Heroin

black tar heroinBlack tar heroin is a cheap form of the potent drug heroin. Black tar heroin is mainly made in Mexico but it can be found in America, as well as, Canada and certain parts of Europe. Black tar heroin is less pure than other heroin making it not only cheaper to produce but also cheaper to buy. Black tar heroin is also known as Cheeb, muck, Mexican mud, brown or black, or boy. Black tar heroin varies in color and texture and also in its potency. Black tar heroin can be any color between black and brown. It is most often very firm and rock like or kind of sticky. Black tar heroin ranges in purity between 30 and 80 percent. Black tar heroin can be injected, snorted, or smoked. Regardless of the routes of administration black tar heroin is very dangerous.

People who abuse prescription drugs are at a high risk of using black tar heroin because it is significantly cheaper and easier to obtain in comparison to prescription drugs like Oxycontin or Vicodin.

When a user inhales or injects black tar heroin, they experience opiate-ish effects which include relaxation, loss of anxiety, and a rush of euphoria that is followed up by a sleepy dream like state. Black tar heroin similar to heroin in that it causes a kind of painless or anesthetic feeling. Many black tar heroin users experience a significant loss of concentration, have trouble focusing, and their balance is affected. They may also have limited responsiveness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, itching, dry mouth and diarrhea. As with other opiate drugs, black tar heroin has a high risk of addiction. It is easy to build a tolerance and dependence can develop quickly to black to heroin which leads to an increase of use and potential overdoses and even death.

The addiction black tar heroin is associated with excruciating and painful withdrawals that can last for a long time. Black tar heroin users will experience a range of symptoms when they begin the process of withdrawals which can include everything including aches, tremors, nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, severe headaches, fever, sweating, diarrhea, insomnia, heart palpitation, increased blood pressure and changes to breathing. Users also may experience psychological changes when they have black tar heroin withdrawals that include anxiety, hallucinations, paranoia, depression and suicidal thoughts.

Black tar heroin is a relatively new drug available on the streets but heroin isn’t. Heroin was first discovered in the late 1800’s through a process of synthesizing opium to find a powerful substance than morphine. Black tar heroin was found when scientists synthesized the newly discovered heroin. Initially it was used as a drug to treat respiratory disorders and pain relief but it soon became a popular recreational drug. Heroin was outlawed entirely in the early 1930s but the addiction rates and recreational use didn’t change one bit.

It want until recently that black tar heroin was rediscovered and Mexican drug cartels began to make the drug again. This may have been in response to a global rise in demand and prices for powdered heroin. Drug traffickers and gangs who successfully dealt cocaine wanted to get on the black tar heroin market because it was cheap and easy drug to sell to young and inexperienced people and addicts who had established an established addiction to heroin or cocaine.

DXM Addiction

DXM Addiction

Dextromethorphan (DXM), is a common ingredient found in many over-the-counter cough and cold medicines, and is used as a recreational drug for its dissociative effects. Dextromethorphan has powerful dissociative properties when taken at doses well above the recommended therapeutic dosage for cough suppression. DXM addiction is sometimes referred to in slang form as robo-tripping, derived from the Robitussin brand name, or Triple Cs, which comes from the Coricidin brand because the pills are printed with “CCC,” which stands for Coricidin Cough and Cold.

DXM Effects

DXM in low recreational doses (between 100–200 mg), is described as having a euphoric effect. With middle doses come more intense euphoria, vivid imagination, and closed-eye hallucinations. With high doses of DXM, there is a profound alteration in consciousness and users often report out-of-body experiences or temporary psychosis. Another characteristic of high doses of DXM as seen in DXM addiction is something called “flanging,” speeding up or slowing down of sensory input.

DXM Recreational Use and DXM Addiction

There are definitely specific groups that seem to be at a higher risk of DXM abuse and DXM addiction, including teenagers, alcoholics, and narcotic abusers. Other street names for DXM include: “Candy,” “C-C-C,” “Dex,” “DM,” “Drex,” “Red Devils,” “Robo,” “Rojo,” “Skittles,” “Tussin,” “Velvet,” and “Vitamin D.” And slang terms for abusing DXM are: “Dexing,” “Robotripping,” and “Robodosing.” Some findings suggest that DXM can produce ethanol-like effects in both alcoholics and non-alcoholics and can cause a mild form of craving in alcoholics. In 2005, following the deaths of 5 teenagers known to use DXM in pure powder form, the FDA expressed its concern about potential DXM abuse and DXM addiction.

Plateaus of DXM Use Leading to DXM Addiction

First plateau: alertness, restlessness, increased heartbeat, increased body temperature, intensification of emotions, euphoria, loss of balance, and mild inebriation similar to drunkenness.

Second plateau: effects are similar to the first plateau, but with heavier intoxication, choppy sensory input, a dreamlike state of consciousness, some detachment from outside world, and closed-eye hallucinations; slurred speech, mild hallucinations, short term memory impairment.

Third plateau: difficulty recognizing people or objects, chaotic blindness, dreamlike vision, inability to comprehend language, abstract hallucinations, delayed reaction time, decision making impairment, feelings of peace and quiet, near complete loss of motor coordination, short-term memory impairment, and/or feelings of rebirth. This third level is an altered state of consciousness and vision or other senses may be impaired.

Fourth plateau: loss of contact and control with their own body, changes in visual perception, out-of-body experiences, perceptions of contact with “superior” beings, lack of movement or desire to move, rapid heart rate, complete blindness, increased hearing, and intensification of third plateau effects. The fourth state, a person can lose contact with their body and with all senses shut off. This level of intoxication is similar to using PCP or to that of being in a K hole (overdose of ketamine known as Special K).

Plateau Sigma: occurs by prolonging dosage; marked by psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations. Users report auditory hallucinations, for example rather than simply feeling tired and sitting down, a user might hear a voice saying, “sit down now, you’re tired,” and feel compelled to obey. These experiences are mostly described as unpleasant.

Symptoms of DXM Addiction

A survey of DXM users showed that more than half of them reported experiencing the following withdrawal symptoms for the first week after long-term and/or chronic use, or DXM addiction: fatigue, apathy, flashbacks, and constipation. Over a quarter of DXM users reported insomnia, nightmares, an inability to experience pleasure in usual activities, impaired memory, attention deficit and decreased libido. Other more rare side effects reported were panic attacks, impaired learning, tremor, jaundice, hives and muscle aches. Frequent and long-term usage at very high doses could possibly lead to toxic psychosis and other permanent psychological problems.

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://www.jabfm.org/

How to Taper Down Your Opiate Use Safely

How to Taper Down Your Opiate Use Safely

how to taper down your opiate use

If you do your research on how to taper down your opiate use safely, you will find that there are many opinions floating around out there in the internet ether. One thing is for sure, tapering down your opiate intake is way better than going cold turkey.

Taper Down vs. Cold Turkey

You will want to taper down your opiate use. Trust me. If you have never experienced withdrawals or being dope sick, then you are quite lucky, indeed. Knowing what to expect so that you can prepare both physically and mentally is a great way to begin getting off of opiates, even before you actually start to taper down.

Going cold turkey is the opposite of doing a taper off plan. Cold turkey means to just up and quit without weaning yourself off of the steady supply of opiates you have been taking. If you don’t taper off, your withdrawal will be much more acute: the dope sick symptoms will be way more harsh and difficult to endure.

Opiate Withdrawal Symptoms

Opiate withdrawal symptoms are often described as flu-like in nature. You will experience muscle aches, watery eyes, excessive yawning, runny nose, sweating, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, vomiting, and chills and goose bumps.

There are also psychological withdrawal symptoms when you quit taking opiates. You will experience insomnia, depression, agitation and anxiety. Neurological symptoms of opiate withdrawal are restlessness (such as Restless Leg Syndrome – which you may experience in your arms and neck, as well) and, in severe cases, seizures.

How to Taper Down From Opiates

You will want to go about your taper in a slow and regimented way. One way to do this is to reduce your opiate doses by about 20% to 25% every 2 or 3 days to minimize withdrawals. Tapering off your dosage before you stop cold turkey makes everything so much better. If you are taking anything above 10 mg of any opiate more than twice a day then tapering to a lower dosage is the best thing you can do for you and your body. You may think this is impossible but it can be done and your withdrawal symptoms will be greatly lessened.

Other Helpful Tips While You Taper Off Opiates

OTCs

  • Get over-the-counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen (Advil) or naproxen (Aleve), and acetaminophen (Tylenol). Also get Epsom salts and take hot baths as often as possible during your taper down from opiates. These will help you to manage the body aches that you will experience during withdrawal. Remember: the small aches that you’ve been handling easily with opiates are going to feel magnified while the drugs are leaving your system.
  • Get an antihistamine with sedating effects, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl), or dimenhydrinate (Dramamine). These will help with the watery eyes as well as with the nausea and insomnia.
  • Get anti-diarrhea medicine. Again, going through withdrawal from opiates, even if you taper off opiates will cause diarrhea. Loperamide hydrochloride (Immodium AD) is your best bet.

**Helpful hint: Make sure to get a 2-week supply of these over-the-counter medications because, once you start the withdrawal process, you will not want to walk or drive anywhere.

Prepare a comfortable environment, whether it’s your room or the couch. Be sure to have comfortable pillows and comfy blankets.

Don’t go it alone. If you aren’t checking into a rehab facility, then stay with someone who will support you during the withdrawal process and who understands how to taper off of opiates. This is particularly helpful because you may be tempted to take more than you have planned once the going gets tough. Having someone help you taper down by holding onto your opiate supply and giving you each dose on a strict schedule.

And lastly, drink plenty of water and eat regularly, even if you don’t feel hungry. Your body needs nourishment and hydration. Vomiting and diarrhea can cause dehydration so be sure to drink water or fruit juice to replace any fluids that you lose.

 

 

 

 

Source:

http://www.wikihow.com/

What can cocaine be cut with?

What can cocaine be cut with?

what can cocaine be cut with?Cocaine is rarely pure. Cocaine users may think what they are getting is pure cocaine but the truth is it is always cut with something to make it less pure and therefore upping the profit for the cocaine dealer. There are many things that cocaine can be cut with. Here are some of the most common things:

  • Baking soda
  • Sugars, such as lactose, inositol, and mannitol.
  • Local anesthetic, such as lidocaine or benzocaine, which mimics or adds to cocaine’s numbing effect on mucous membranes.
  • Cocaine may also be “cut” with other stimulants such as methamphetamine.

What can cocaine be cut with? Baking Soda

Baking soda is merely just another almost unrecognizable powder that can be mixed with cocaine so the user doesn’t know it has been cut. Sodium bicarbonate or baking powder is a white solid that is crystalline but often appears as a fine powder. It has a slightly salty, alkaline taste resembling that of washing soda (sodium carbonate).

What can cocaine be cut with? Lactose

Another major use of lactose is in the pharmaceutical industry. Lactose is added to pills as filler because of its physical properties and low price. Because of this reason it also makes a great thing to cut cocaine with.

What can cocaine be cut with? Inositol and Mannitol

Inositol is used as an adulterant (or cutting agent) in many illegal drugs, such as cocaine, methamphetamine, and sometimes heroin. It is presumed that this use is connected with one or more of the substance’s properties of solubility, powdery texture, or reduced sweetness (50%) as compared with more common sugars. Inositol is also used as a stand-in for cocaine on television.

Mannitol is sometimes used as an adulterant or cutting agent for heroin, methamphetamines, cocaine, or other illicit drugs. In popular culture, when it is used in this manner, it is often referred to as baby laxative. Other places you can find mannitol? Your chewing gum!

What can cocaine be cut with? Lidocaine

Lidocaine is often added to cocaine as a diluent. Cocaine numbs the gums when applied, and since lidocaine causes stronger numbness, so a cocaine user gets the impression of high-quality cocaine when in actuality, the user is receiving a diluted product.

What can cocaine be cut with? Benzocaine

Benzocaine is commonly found, as an impurity in street cocaine. While it gives a numbing effect similar to cocaine on users’ gums it does not actually produce the effects of cocaine

What can cocaine be cut with? Meth

Cocaine cut with meth can make a dangerous mixture. This is especially true for the person who thinks they are just doing cocaine and has never done meth. Meth is much more potent than cocaine and the high is much more long lasting. Cocaine that is cut with meth would be very potent and intense.

Regardless of what cocaine is cut with, cocaine users should be wary. If cocaine is cut with anything that doesn’t mix well with the user it can be highly dangerous.

 

 

Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Are Roxys Worse Than Heroin?

Roxys, slang for Roxicodone – a brand name for the generic oxycodone, is basically heroin in a pill form. It is an opioid, narcotic painkiller that is highly addictive. Roxys can be swallowed, smoked, crushed and snorted, or mixed with water and injected – all just like heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Social Acceptance

What makes roxys worse than heroin, in a way, is their social acceptance. Roxicodone and Roxicet are legal by prescription whereas heroin is a known illicit “street drug.” People who are prescribed roxys by their doctors are more likely to follow doctors’ orders without asking questions about the drug they are being given. Roxicodone is a powerfully potent narcotic that has the same incidence of addictiveness as heroin.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Accessibility

Roxy is arguably worse than heroin because it is a lot more accessible than heroin. Whereas heroin is only available on the street, roxys can be found in many home medicine cabinets. More and more high school students and college students are taking painkillers like roxycodone because their parents or their friends’ parents leave their prescription bottles lying around. Also, people who they themselves have been prescribed roxys due to a legitimate condition with pain become hooked and can simply get their doctors to keep prescribing the painkillers. And, roxys like heroin can be bought “on the street,” too.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Physical Dependence

Roxys come in 15, 20, and 30 mg and it is said that a 30mg pill of Roxicodone or Roxicet is the equivalent to one bag of heroin but that is not a trusted way to compare the two, since heroin potency can vary from bag to bag and batch to batch.

The withdrawal from roxys and heroin can range from mild to severe, depending on how much and how long you have been taking either drug. Withdrawal symptoms usually begin six to 30 hours after last use and can be compared to flu-like in nature. People who are physically dependent on roxys or heroin will experience agitation, anxiety, muscle aches, watery eyes, insomnia, runny nose, sweating, and constant yawning when they suddenly stop using, or go cold turkey. Also, restless legs (and arms, neck, hands, and feet) also called “the jimmies,” anxiety, and depression are all part and parcel of opiate withdrawal. These symptoms are virtually the same for both roxy users and heroin users.

Some people say withdrawal from roxies is worse than heroin and other say that heroin withdrawal is worse. It really depends on the individual, how much they have been using, for how long, and the number of times they have gone cold turkey. Because, every time you “kick” is like a shock to the system and so each time gets worse and worse.

Roxys Worse than Heroin: Overdose

Both heroin and roxys are a central nervous system depressant which means that, if you take too much, your breathing can be slowed to a halt. This is when overdose occurs. Many times, people simply fall asleep and stop breathing when they have taken too much of either drug. Heroin may be slightly worse than roxys in this capacity because its potency is never exactly known whereas, a 30mg roxy pill is always 30mg. But, people abusing roxys and heroin have the same tendency to overdo it, leading to tragic repercussions.

So, Are Roxys Worse than Heroin?

Basically, these drugs are one in the same and are both extremely potent and addictive. Because of their social acceptance and accessibility, it can be argued that roxys are worse than heroin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.drugsense.org/

http://alcoholism.about.com/

Nucynta Addiction

Nucynta Addiction

Nucynta is the brand name for an opioid SNRI known as Tapentadol. Nucynta provides pain relief that is comparable to other more well-known opioid analgesics such as hydrocodone and oxycodone but has more tolerable side effects. The way Nucynta works has been compared to tramadol and oxycodone but its potency is said to be somewhere between morphine and tramadol in effectiveness.

Nucynta is a brand new opioid analgesic to hit the market. Nucynta or Tapentadol, was approved by the United States FDA for the treatment of moderate to acute pain, and in 2011, the extended release formula of the drug known as Nucynta ER, was approved by the US FDA for the treatment of specific types of moderate to severe chronic pain. Because Nucynta not only helps to combat pain but also helps with norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, Nucynta has the possibility of helping with many off-label uses including chronic pain and certain mood disorders. The mixture of an opiate and a serotonin-norepinephrine (SNRI) reuptake inhibitor is meant to make the opiate more effective.

So if Nucynta is an opiate is it addictive?

Yes. Nucynta has many adverse effects including an addiction potential. Many of the side effects of Nucynta are similar to those of oxycodone and morphine. Nucynta has been shown to cause less nausea and dizziness than morphine though. Nucynta can impair physical and mental abilities and with regular use can result in dependence which can lead to a Nucynta addiction. Someone who has a Nucynta addiction will experience Nucynta withdrawal symptoms just as they would if they had any other kind of opiate addiction.

Nucynta addiction

Nucynta can be abuse either by crushing, chewing, snorting or injecting it. Using Nucynta in this way can easily lead to an overdose and potentially death. Nucynta addiction overdose is not very common but it can happen. Nucynta can suppress breathing and this can cause overdose and death. Nucynta overdose is more likely to happen if it is taken with other drug such as alcohol. Alcohol has been shown to increase the effects of Nucynta making it much more dangerous. Signs of a Nucynta overdose can include hypotension, coma, respiratory depression, and somnolence.

Someone who has a past history of addiction is at a much higher risk of abusing Nucynta and is at a higher risk of using Nucynta with other drugs and alcohol; and is therefore also at a much higher risk of developing a Nucynta addiction.

Nucynta addiction looks just like an addiction to any other opiate. Many Nucynta addicts will use the same methods to get the drug that they would use to get morphine or oxycodone. Nucynta addiction can cause a person to doctor shop, medication seek, and buy the drug on the street. The potential this drug has for a Nucynta addiction is part of the reason it is classified as a Schedule II narcotic with oxycodone and morphine.

Once a Nucynta addiction has formed in order for the individual to get off the drug they have to go through the withdrawal process. Withdrawal symptoms due to a Nucynta addiction can be realy unpleasant and just as with any other opiate withdrawal it is recommended that a Nucynta addict seek professional medical help.

Nucynta addiction withdrawal symptoms can include but are not limited to:

  • Anxiety
  • Sweating
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Tremors
  • Diarrhea
  • Hallucinations

Treatment for a Nucynta addiction usually begins with detox where the individual will be given suboxone or will slowly taper off the medication. Luckily for anyone with a Nucynta addiction treatment is available and no one has to be stuck in it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tapentadol

http://www.webmd.com/drugs/drug-152563-Nucynta+Oral.aspx?drugid=152563&drugname=Nucynta+Oral&source=0&pagenumber=4

The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

When determining which drugs are the hardest drugs to kick, it is helpful to see which the most addictive drugs are. These two concepts are pretty much synonymous. This is because rate of dependence and severity of withdrawal symptoms have everything to do with trying to kick a nasty drug habit.

The following is a list of the 5 hardest drugs to kick, from least to greatest in difficulty. This list is based on a study put together by Dutch scientists who replicated a London study and devised a “dependency rating” that measures addictive potency of the biggest drugs out there. The scale of 0-to-3 shows how the hardest drugs to kick measure up.

#5 Crystal Meth 2.24

What makes crystal meth one of the hardest drugs to kick is that, like heroin and nicotine, meth also imitates dopamine, the reward chemical, and norepinephrine, the alertness chemical, causing your neurons to release more of both—all the while training your brain to want them more. But meth takes it a step further; it can damage dopamine- and norepinephrine-releasing neurons, which leads to a drastic decrease in their production, which makes you crave meth even more.

#4 Methadone 2.68

Basically legalized heroin, methadone is highly addictive because the way it works and is used as a treatment for heroin addiction is to build dependence. And in the case of methadone, dependence is the same as addiction.

Now, it is debatable whether methadone belongs at #4 on the list of hardest drugs to kick because, in my personal experience and from others who have shared their methadone experiences with me, I find it to be a much nastier drug to kick than heroin.

The withdrawals are hell on earth. Heroin withdrawal is said to be more acute but lasts for a much shorter period of time, about a week depending on usage and your body chemistry. Methadone withdrawal is really just as bad when it comes to the severity of the symptoms. What makes methadone harder to kick than heroin is that the withdrawal symptoms last for a longer period of time. And I mean a lot longer. For me it was about a month and a half before I started to feel normal again. Some people experience methadone withdrawal for even longer than that. Because of this, many people return to their drug use to feel better again, making methadone one of the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

#3 Nicotine 2.82

Nicotine mimics chemicals that stimulate the “reward system” in the brain and then actually replaces them. Nicotine addiction occurs because this replacement causes your brain to make less of the naturally occurring good stuff and so the brain now needs nicotine to maintain normal functioning.

Statistics don’t lie: nicotine proves to be one of the hardest drugs to kick by the sheer number of nicotine addicts in the US: 50,000,000; and one in every five deaths nationwide are the result of smoking.

And actually, there is a tie for spots 2 and 3 which many may find surprising. That’s right, the study found that nicotine is just as hard to kick as crack cocaine.

#2 Crack Cocaine 2.82

Although crack is comprised of cocaine, smoking processed crack causes a faster, higher rush that lasts for less time than powder coke. The intensity of the crack high combined with the efficient method of use—smoking—are the big reasons why crack is number two in the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

Crack addiction is dramatically higher than that of snorted cocaine powder. In 2010, there were an estimated 500,000 active crack cocaine addicts in the United States. And although not physical in nature, the psychological withdrawal symptoms from crack are intense and terrifying: hallucinations, severe anxiety, and depression.

#1 Heroin 2.89

Again, statistics show how heroin is one of the hardest drugs to kick. In the US in 2003, an estimated 281,000 people sought treatment for heroin addiction, and according to the National Institute on Drug Addiction, 23% of people who try heroin become full on addicts.

Heroin is easy to get hooked on. It reduces pain while at the same time causes pleasure. Who wouldn’t want to feel this way? By injecting, snorting or smoking heroin, you are training your brain to make you crave it. After you are physically dependent on heroin, the nasty withdrawal symptoms are enough to keep you coming back for more. It’s clear that heroin is the hardest drug to kick once you’re hooked on it.

 Honorable Mention(s):

Alcohol and Benzodiazepines

Both alcohol and benzos (such as Valium and Xanax) are also some of the hardest drugs to kick because the withdrawal symptoms that result from trying to kick cold turkey are very intense and even possibly fatal. People who stop using alcohol and benzos can experience hallucinations, sweats, anxiety, tremors, seizures, cardiac arrest and even death as a result of these symptoms.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.alternet.org/

http://www.thefix.com/

http://www.drugabuse.gov/

Clonidine for Opiate Withdrawal

Clonidine for Opiate Withdrawal

Clonidine is actually a medication that has many uses. But clonidine also happens to be an old school medication used in the treatment of opiate withdrawal since 1978.

What is clonidine?

Clonidine is a prescription medication that is used to treat everything from high blood pressure to ADHD and panic disorder. Clonidine, when it was originally prescribed, was used for the treatment of high blood pressure but it also found other ways to be useful. Clonidine can help in the treatment of neuropathic pain, insomnia, ADHD, with the symptoms of menopause, as a veterinary anesthetic drug and for opiate withdrawal. Clonidine also has several off-label uses, and has been prescribed to treat psychiatric disorders including stress, sleep disorders, and hyper-arousal caused by post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, and other anxiety disorders

Clonidine and withdrawal

While clonidine is most popularly used in the treatment of opiate withdrawal it can also be used to help with the withdrawal symptoms associated with nicotine withdrawal, alcohol withdrawal and other narcotics. The way clonidine works for withdrawal is it helps to alleviate the symptoms of withdrawal.

What is opiate withdrawal?

Opiate withdrawal refers to the wide range of symptoms that occur after stopping or dramatically reducing opiate drugs after long and heavy drug use. An opiate drug that would cause opiate withdrawal could be anything from heroin, morphine, codeine, Oxycontin, Dilaudid, to methadone.

Opiates such as the medications listed above cause a physical dependence and this physical dependence causes a person to rely on the medication to feel ok. When a person becomes reliant on an opiate to be ok chances are they are going to experience opiate withdrawal when they decide to stop or want to stop.

Clonidine for withdrawal

Many of the symptoms associated with opiate withdrawal are severely unpleasant.

Early symptoms of withdrawal include:

•Agitation

•Anxiety

•Muscle aches

•Increased tearing

•Insomnia

•Runny nose

•Sweating

•Yawning

Late symptoms of withdrawal include:

•Abdominal cramping

•Diarrhea

•Dilated pupils

•Goose bumps

•Nausea

•Vomiting

Clonidine for opiate withdrawal can help to alleviate many of these. For instance clonidine for opiate withdrawal can help with irregular heartbeat and high blood pressure. Clonidine for opiate withdrawal can also help to reduce the sweating, hot and cold flashes and restlessness associated with opiate withdrawal. The sedation effects of clonidine can also help with the symptoms of opiate withdrawal that include insomnia. Clonidine for opiate withdrawal may also be helpful with little aches and pains. Clonidine for opiate withdrawal can also help with the restless leg syndrome many opiate addicts experience.

Clonidine for opiate withdrawal is most often used in a medical setting such as an opiate detox. An opiate detox is equipped to give out medication and help individuals to detox from opiates. At an opiate detox clonidine is usually available in tablets that go by their brand name (catapres, catapresan, and dixarit). The normal daily dosage of clonidine for opiate withdrawal ranges between 0.5 and 1.5 milligrams depending on the stage as well as the severity of the withdrawal symptoms.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clonidine

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000949.htm

 

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

First of all, good luck. If you have never experienced opiate withdrawal symptoms, also called being dope sick, you are lucky. If you have, then you know what hell on earth feels like. And, if you have gone through opiate withdrawals more than once, you probably also have noticed that they get worse every subsequent time you stop or run out of your supply. This is because your body is going through a kind of shock: your brain has been altered by taking opiates (such as Oxycodone, Roxicet, heroin, etc.) and without these substances, your brain and therefore body go into panic mode.

Often times compared to being flu-like symptoms, opiate withdrawals are intense, acute, and although not life-threatening, it sure feels like you’re dying.

While going through opiate withdrawal, you may experience some or all of the following:

  • Agitation and anxiety
  • Depression
  • Muscle aches
  • Watery Eyes
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Runny nose
  • Restlessness
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Dilated pupils
  • Chills and goose bumps

Here are 10 things you can do to survive opiate withdrawal:

1. Prepare a comfortable environment:

Keep your tablet or TV and DVD player nearby so that you can watch some lighthearted movies.

Make sure that your room is at a comfortable temperature, and make sure that you have some soft blankets and maybe a fan. Prepare to change your sheets often because of sweating.

Wear loose and comfortable clothing. Again, you’ll probably have to change clothes a lot because of the sweating.

2. Avoid going through opiate withdrawal alone. If you don’t plan to check yourself into a rehab facility, then stay with someone who can support you during the withdrawal period.

3. Take some time off from your usual activities. Opiate withdrawal may take up to 2 weeks, so try to take some time off of work. If you have a family, then check yourself into a rehab facility or go somewhere where your children won’t have to see you going through opiate withdrawals.

4. Slowly taper off your narcotics. Reduce your doses of opioids or medications by about 20 to 25 percent every 2 or 3 days to minimize opiate withdrawals.

5. Try community detox. Check out your local methadone clinic so that you can gradually wean yourself off of narcotics by taking gradually decreasing doses of methadone. Community detox will allow you to go on with your daily life without checking in to an in-patient facility.

6. Go to a psychiatric ward or other inpatient psychiatric facility if you’ve had episodes of suicidal thoughts or hurting yourself in the past. Opiate withdrawal can bring out these negative behaviors, which could put you in real danger. If you have a history of depression or other psychiatric problems, then do your detox under medical supervision.

7. Check yourself into a rehabilitation facility.

Also called inpatient therapy, you will receive individual and group therapy and support. While you stay in a rehabilitation facility, you can talk to counselors about your addiction or you can spend time in support groups with other addicts.

8. Give yourself a lot of positive reinforcement. Try some of these strategies:

Tell yourself that your withdrawal pains from opiates are like labor pains. You’re giving birth to a new you.

Write a notice to yourself that says, “I’m a fantastic person, and I’m doing something amazing.” Post the notice where you can see it.

Give yourself a non-drug reward for every day that you make it through opiate withdrawal.

9. Remember to eat food and drink water. You may not feel like eating or drinking fluids, but your body needs nourishment and hydration. Eat saltines or yogurt or other foods that are easy on your stomach. Also, be sure to drink water or fruit juice to replace any fluids that you lose from vomiting or diarrhea.

10. Get some light exercise. Don’t overdo it, but take a short walk around your neighborhood or do some light housework. Exercise will keep your spirits up and will help to distract you from the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.wikihow.com/

http://www.health.harvard.edu/

What is Hippy Crack?

What is Hippy Crack?

Hippy crack may be better known to you as nitrous oxide and nitrous oxide may be even better known to you as, well, laughing gas or when abuse whip its. Hippy crack is simply laughing gas. Yes, it is the same stuff you get at the dentist. Hippy crack or nitrous oxide is a colorless, non-flammable gas, with a slightly sweet odor and taste. It is used in surgery and dentistry for its anesthetic and analgesic effects. It is known as “laughing gas” because of the euphoric effects of inhaling it; which has led to its recreational use as a dissociative anesthetic and its new name “hippy crack.”

And hippy crack is very popular among young people and even celebrities. Think Demi Moore and kids who aren’t old enough to buy alcohol.

The legal high known as ‘hippy crack’ was used by one in 16 young people, according to new figures. The first data to be released on the use of nitrous oxide reveals more than six per cent, or 350,000 people aged 16-24 year used the drug last year. Because hippy crack is so popular and because of its legality it makes it seem “safe”. This just isn’t the case. Hippy crack or laughing gas as it is lovingly named is actually very dangerous to health.

“Hippy crackheads” or nitrous oxide abusers when they inhale the gas will feel extremely euphoric, dizzy, and detached and numb while high on nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide abusers also may have auditory and visual hallucinations. The high often lasts for three to five minutes. During repeated use, nitrous oxide has been shown to damage the out ring of the cortex in the brain, which is responsible for general awareness; and the connective region of the cortex, which controls episodic (long-term) memory. Symptoms of hippy crack abuse include nausea, slurred speech, lack of coordination and depression. Repeated use of hippy crack also causes B12 vitamin deficiency. Even if the nitrous oxide abuser or hippy crackhead does not overdose, it can put them at risk for anemia. Nitrous oxide reduces red blood cell count since it pushes oxygen out of the blood stream. That can lead to nerve and organ damage.

Hippy crack or laughing gas better known as nitrous oxide can also be fatal. Repeated nitrous oxide abuse causes fatal danger because it causes respiratory depression, also known as hypoventilation. This prevents carbon dioxide from leaving the body, which in turn reduces the amount of oxygen reaching the brain. When the brain does not receive enough oxygen, seizures and loss of consciousness can happen. A common side effect after use is vomiting. Therefore, an unconscious nitrous oxide abuser cannot clear the airway of vomit. Asphyxiation or choking can also occur and cause death since the nitrous oxide has replaced oxygen in the lungs. Inhaling hippy crack can also lead to sudden death syndrome. There have been incidences where just one inhalation of hippy crack has led to death most likely for the reasons mentioned above.

Nitrous oxide may get laughable names such as “hippy crack” or “laughing gas” but it is no joke. Nitrous oxide is a potent gas that can seriously do some damage to the human body and brain as well.

http://voices.yahoo.com/the-dangers-nitrous-oxide-abuse-10888845.html?cat=71