Nucynta Addiction

Nucynta Addiction

Nucynta is the brand name for an opioid SNRI known as Tapentadol. Nucynta provides pain relief that is comparable to other more well-known opioid analgesics such as hydrocodone and oxycodone but has more tolerable side effects. The way Nucynta works has been compared to tramadol and oxycodone but its potency is said to be somewhere between morphine and tramadol in effectiveness.

Nucynta is a brand new opioid analgesic to hit the market. Nucynta or Tapentadol, was approved by the United States FDA for the treatment of moderate to acute pain, and in 2011, the extended release formula of the drug known as Nucynta ER, was approved by the US FDA for the treatment of specific types of moderate to severe chronic pain. Because Nucynta not only helps to combat pain but also helps with norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, Nucynta has the possibility of helping with many off-label uses including chronic pain and certain mood disorders. The mixture of an opiate and a serotonin-norepinephrine (SNRI) reuptake inhibitor is meant to make the opiate more effective.

So if Nucynta is an opiate is it addictive?

Yes. Nucynta has many adverse effects including an addiction potential. Many of the side effects of Nucynta are similar to those of oxycodone and morphine. Nucynta has been shown to cause less nausea and dizziness than morphine though. Nucynta can impair physical and mental abilities and with regular use can result in dependence which can lead to a Nucynta addiction. Someone who has a Nucynta addiction will experience Nucynta withdrawal symptoms just as they would if they had any other kind of opiate addiction.

Nucynta addiction

Nucynta can be abuse either by crushing, chewing, snorting or injecting it. Using Nucynta in this way can easily lead to an overdose and potentially death. Nucynta addiction overdose is not very common but it can happen. Nucynta can suppress breathing and this can cause overdose and death. Nucynta overdose is more likely to happen if it is taken with other drug such as alcohol. Alcohol has been shown to increase the effects of Nucynta making it much more dangerous. Signs of a Nucynta overdose can include hypotension, coma, respiratory depression, and somnolence.

Someone who has a past history of addiction is at a much higher risk of abusing Nucynta and is at a higher risk of using Nucynta with other drugs and alcohol; and is therefore also at a much higher risk of developing a Nucynta addiction.

Nucynta addiction looks just like an addiction to any other opiate. Many Nucynta addicts will use the same methods to get the drug that they would use to get morphine or oxycodone. Nucynta addiction can cause a person to doctor shop, medication seek, and buy the drug on the street. The potential this drug has for a Nucynta addiction is part of the reason it is classified as a Schedule II narcotic with oxycodone and morphine.

Once a Nucynta addiction has formed in order for the individual to get off the drug they have to go through the withdrawal process. Withdrawal symptoms due to a Nucynta addiction can be realy unpleasant and just as with any other opiate withdrawal it is recommended that a Nucynta addict seek professional medical help.

Nucynta addiction withdrawal symptoms can include but are not limited to:

  • Anxiety
  • Sweating
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Tremors
  • Diarrhea
  • Hallucinations

Treatment for a Nucynta addiction usually begins with detox where the individual will be given suboxone or will slowly taper off the medication. Luckily for anyone with a Nucynta addiction treatment is available and no one has to be stuck in it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tapentadol

http://www.webmd.com/drugs/drug-152563-Nucynta+Oral.aspx?drugid=152563&drugname=Nucynta+Oral&source=0&pagenumber=4

The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

The 5 Hardest Drugs to Kick

When determining which drugs are the hardest drugs to kick, it is helpful to see which the most addictive drugs are. These two concepts are pretty much synonymous. This is because rate of dependence and severity of withdrawal symptoms have everything to do with trying to kick a nasty drug habit.

The following is a list of the 5 hardest drugs to kick, from least to greatest in difficulty. This list is based on a study put together by Dutch scientists who replicated a London study and devised a “dependency rating” that measures addictive potency of the biggest drugs out there. The scale of 0-to-3 shows how the hardest drugs to kick measure up.

#5 Crystal Meth 2.24

What makes crystal meth one of the hardest drugs to kick is that, like heroin and nicotine, meth also imitates dopamine, the reward chemical, and norepinephrine, the alertness chemical, causing your neurons to release more of both—all the while training your brain to want them more. But meth takes it a step further; it can damage dopamine- and norepinephrine-releasing neurons, which leads to a drastic decrease in their production, which makes you crave meth even more.

#4 Methadone 2.68

Basically legalized heroin, methadone is highly addictive because the way it works and is used as a treatment for heroin addiction is to build dependence. And in the case of methadone, dependence is the same as addiction.

Now, it is debatable whether methadone belongs at #4 on the list of hardest drugs to kick because, in my personal experience and from others who have shared their methadone experiences with me, I find it to be a much nastier drug to kick than heroin.

The withdrawals are hell on earth. Heroin withdrawal is said to be more acute but lasts for a much shorter period of time, about a week depending on usage and your body chemistry. Methadone withdrawal is really just as bad when it comes to the severity of the symptoms. What makes methadone harder to kick than heroin is that the withdrawal symptoms last for a longer period of time. And I mean a lot longer. For me it was about a month and a half before I started to feel normal again. Some people experience methadone withdrawal for even longer than that. Because of this, many people return to their drug use to feel better again, making methadone one of the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

#3 Nicotine 2.82

Nicotine mimics chemicals that stimulate the “reward system” in the brain and then actually replaces them. Nicotine addiction occurs because this replacement causes your brain to make less of the naturally occurring good stuff and so the brain now needs nicotine to maintain normal functioning.

Statistics don’t lie: nicotine proves to be one of the hardest drugs to kick by the sheer number of nicotine addicts in the US: 50,000,000; and one in every five deaths nationwide are the result of smoking.

And actually, there is a tie for spots 2 and 3 which many may find surprising. That’s right, the study found that nicotine is just as hard to kick as crack cocaine.

#2 Crack Cocaine 2.82

Although crack is comprised of cocaine, smoking processed crack causes a faster, higher rush that lasts for less time than powder coke. The intensity of the crack high combined with the efficient method of use—smoking—are the big reasons why crack is number two in the top 5 hardest drugs to kick.

Crack addiction is dramatically higher than that of snorted cocaine powder. In 2010, there were an estimated 500,000 active crack cocaine addicts in the United States. And although not physical in nature, the psychological withdrawal symptoms from crack are intense and terrifying: hallucinations, severe anxiety, and depression.

#1 Heroin 2.89

Again, statistics show how heroin is one of the hardest drugs to kick. In the US in 2003, an estimated 281,000 people sought treatment for heroin addiction, and according to the National Institute on Drug Addiction, 23% of people who try heroin become full on addicts.

Heroin is easy to get hooked on. It reduces pain while at the same time causes pleasure. Who wouldn’t want to feel this way? By injecting, snorting or smoking heroin, you are training your brain to make you crave it. After you are physically dependent on heroin, the nasty withdrawal symptoms are enough to keep you coming back for more. It’s clear that heroin is the hardest drug to kick once you’re hooked on it.

 Honorable Mention(s):

Alcohol and Benzodiazepines

Both alcohol and benzos (such as Valium and Xanax) are also some of the hardest drugs to kick because the withdrawal symptoms that result from trying to kick cold turkey are very intense and even possibly fatal. People who stop using alcohol and benzos can experience hallucinations, sweats, anxiety, tremors, seizures, cardiac arrest and even death as a result of these symptoms.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.alternet.org/

http://www.thefix.com/

http://www.drugabuse.gov/

Clonidine for Opiate Withdrawal

Clonidine for Opiate Withdrawal

Clonidine is actually a medication that has many uses. But clonidine also happens to be an old school medication used in the treatment of opiate withdrawal since 1978.

What is clonidine?

Clonidine is a prescription medication that is used to treat everything from high blood pressure to ADHD and panic disorder. Clonidine, when it was originally prescribed, was used for the treatment of high blood pressure but it also found other ways to be useful. Clonidine can help in the treatment of neuropathic pain, insomnia, ADHD, with the symptoms of menopause, as a veterinary anesthetic drug and for opiate withdrawal. Clonidine also has several off-label uses, and has been prescribed to treat psychiatric disorders including stress, sleep disorders, and hyper-arousal caused by post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, and other anxiety disorders

Clonidine and withdrawal

While clonidine is most popularly used in the treatment of opiate withdrawal it can also be used to help with the withdrawal symptoms associated with nicotine withdrawal, alcohol withdrawal and other narcotics. The way clonidine works for withdrawal is it helps to alleviate the symptoms of withdrawal.

What is opiate withdrawal?

Opiate withdrawal refers to the wide range of symptoms that occur after stopping or dramatically reducing opiate drugs after long and heavy drug use. An opiate drug that would cause opiate withdrawal could be anything from heroin, morphine, codeine, Oxycontin, Dilaudid, to methadone.

Opiates such as the medications listed above cause a physical dependence and this physical dependence causes a person to rely on the medication to feel ok. When a person becomes reliant on an opiate to be ok chances are they are going to experience opiate withdrawal when they decide to stop or want to stop.

Clonidine for withdrawal

Many of the symptoms associated with opiate withdrawal are severely unpleasant.

Early symptoms of withdrawal include:

•Agitation

•Anxiety

•Muscle aches

•Increased tearing

•Insomnia

•Runny nose

•Sweating

•Yawning

Late symptoms of withdrawal include:

•Abdominal cramping

•Diarrhea

•Dilated pupils

•Goose bumps

•Nausea

•Vomiting

Clonidine for opiate withdrawal can help to alleviate many of these. For instance clonidine for opiate withdrawal can help with irregular heartbeat and high blood pressure. Clonidine for opiate withdrawal can also help to reduce the sweating, hot and cold flashes and restlessness associated with opiate withdrawal. The sedation effects of clonidine can also help with the symptoms of opiate withdrawal that include insomnia. Clonidine for opiate withdrawal may also be helpful with little aches and pains. Clonidine for opiate withdrawal can also help with the restless leg syndrome many opiate addicts experience.

Clonidine for opiate withdrawal is most often used in a medical setting such as an opiate detox. An opiate detox is equipped to give out medication and help individuals to detox from opiates. At an opiate detox clonidine is usually available in tablets that go by their brand name (catapres, catapresan, and dixarit). The normal daily dosage of clonidine for opiate withdrawal ranges between 0.5 and 1.5 milligrams depending on the stage as well as the severity of the withdrawal symptoms.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clonidine

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000949.htm

 

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

How to Survive Opiate Withdrawal

First of all, good luck. If you have never experienced opiate withdrawal symptoms, also called being dope sick, you are lucky. If you have, then you know what hell on earth feels like. And, if you have gone through opiate withdrawals more than once, you probably also have noticed that they get worse every subsequent time you stop or run out of your supply. This is because your body is going through a kind of shock: your brain has been altered by taking opiates (such as Oxycodone, Roxicet, heroin, etc.) and without these substances, your brain and therefore body go into panic mode.

Often times compared to being flu-like symptoms, opiate withdrawals are intense, acute, and although not life-threatening, it sure feels like you’re dying.

While going through opiate withdrawal, you may experience some or all of the following:

  • Agitation and anxiety
  • Depression
  • Muscle aches
  • Watery Eyes
  • Sweating
  • Insomnia
  • Runny nose
  • Restlessness
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Dilated pupils
  • Chills and goose bumps

Here are 10 things you can do to survive opiate withdrawal:

1. Prepare a comfortable environment:

Keep your tablet or TV and DVD player nearby so that you can watch some lighthearted movies.

Make sure that your room is at a comfortable temperature, and make sure that you have some soft blankets and maybe a fan. Prepare to change your sheets often because of sweating.

Wear loose and comfortable clothing. Again, you’ll probably have to change clothes a lot because of the sweating.

2. Avoid going through opiate withdrawal alone. If you don’t plan to check yourself into a rehab facility, then stay with someone who can support you during the withdrawal period.

3. Take some time off from your usual activities. Opiate withdrawal may take up to 2 weeks, so try to take some time off of work. If you have a family, then check yourself into a rehab facility or go somewhere where your children won’t have to see you going through opiate withdrawals.

4. Slowly taper off your narcotics. Reduce your doses of opioids or medications by about 20 to 25 percent every 2 or 3 days to minimize opiate withdrawals.

5. Try community detox. Check out your local methadone clinic so that you can gradually wean yourself off of narcotics by taking gradually decreasing doses of methadone. Community detox will allow you to go on with your daily life without checking in to an in-patient facility.

6. Go to a psychiatric ward or other inpatient psychiatric facility if you’ve had episodes of suicidal thoughts or hurting yourself in the past. Opiate withdrawal can bring out these negative behaviors, which could put you in real danger. If you have a history of depression or other psychiatric problems, then do your detox under medical supervision.

7. Check yourself into a rehabilitation facility.

Also called inpatient therapy, you will receive individual and group therapy and support. While you stay in a rehabilitation facility, you can talk to counselors about your addiction or you can spend time in support groups with other addicts.

8. Give yourself a lot of positive reinforcement. Try some of these strategies:

Tell yourself that your withdrawal pains from opiates are like labor pains. You’re giving birth to a new you.

Write a notice to yourself that says, “I’m a fantastic person, and I’m doing something amazing.” Post the notice where you can see it.

Give yourself a non-drug reward for every day that you make it through opiate withdrawal.

9. Remember to eat food and drink water. You may not feel like eating or drinking fluids, but your body needs nourishment and hydration. Eat saltines or yogurt or other foods that are easy on your stomach. Also, be sure to drink water or fruit juice to replace any fluids that you lose from vomiting or diarrhea.

10. Get some light exercise. Don’t overdo it, but take a short walk around your neighborhood or do some light housework. Exercise will keep your spirits up and will help to distract you from the symptoms of opiate withdrawal.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.wikihow.com/

http://www.health.harvard.edu/