What is Hippy Crack?

What is Hippy Crack?

Hippy crack may be better known to you as nitrous oxide and nitrous oxide may be even better known to you as, well, laughing gas or when abuse whip its. Hippy crack is simply laughing gas. Yes, it is the same stuff you get at the dentist. Hippy crack or nitrous oxide is a colorless, non-flammable gas, with a slightly sweet odor and taste. It is used in surgery and dentistry for its anesthetic and analgesic effects. It is known as “laughing gas” because of the euphoric effects of inhaling it; which has led to its recreational use as a dissociative anesthetic and its new name “hippy crack.”

And hippy crack is very popular among young people and even celebrities. Think Demi Moore and kids who aren’t old enough to buy alcohol.

The legal high known as ‘hippy crack’ was used by one in 16 young people, according to new figures. The first data to be released on the use of nitrous oxide reveals more than six per cent, or 350,000 people aged 16-24 year used the drug last year. Because hippy crack is so popular and because of its legality it makes it seem “safe”. This just isn’t the case. Hippy crack or laughing gas as it is lovingly named is actually very dangerous to health.

“Hippy crackheads” or nitrous oxide abusers when they inhale the gas will feel extremely euphoric, dizzy, and detached and numb while high on nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide abusers also may have auditory and visual hallucinations. The high often lasts for three to five minutes. During repeated use, nitrous oxide has been shown to damage the out ring of the cortex in the brain, which is responsible for general awareness; and the connective region of the cortex, which controls episodic (long-term) memory. Symptoms of hippy crack abuse include nausea, slurred speech, lack of coordination and depression. Repeated use of hippy crack also causes B12 vitamin deficiency. Even if the nitrous oxide abuser or hippy crackhead does not overdose, it can put them at risk for anemia. Nitrous oxide reduces red blood cell count since it pushes oxygen out of the blood stream. That can lead to nerve and organ damage.

Hippy crack or laughing gas better known as nitrous oxide can also be fatal. Repeated nitrous oxide abuse causes fatal danger because it causes respiratory depression, also known as hypoventilation. This prevents carbon dioxide from leaving the body, which in turn reduces the amount of oxygen reaching the brain. When the brain does not receive enough oxygen, seizures and loss of consciousness can happen. A common side effect after use is vomiting. Therefore, an unconscious nitrous oxide abuser cannot clear the airway of vomit. Asphyxiation or choking can also occur and cause death since the nitrous oxide has replaced oxygen in the lungs. Inhaling hippy crack can also lead to sudden death syndrome. There have been incidences where just one inhalation of hippy crack has led to death most likely for the reasons mentioned above.

Nitrous oxide may get laughable names such as “hippy crack” or “laughing gas” but it is no joke. Nitrous oxide is a potent gas that can seriously do some damage to the human body and brain as well.

http://voices.yahoo.com/the-dangers-nitrous-oxide-abuse-10888845.html?cat=71

 

 

How Heroin and Alcohol Killed Cory Monteith

How Heroin and Alcohol Killed Cory Monteith

 

The combination of heroin and alcohol is currently a hot news topic with the recent accidental death of actor and Glee cast member Cory Monteith.

Tragedy strikes

Saturday, July 6 the Vancouver police said in a news conference Saturday evening that Cory Monteith was found at noon on the hotel’s 21st floor. He had checked into the Fairmont Pacific Rim hotel and had been expected to check out Saturday. When Monteith missed his checkout time at noon, hotel staff went to his room and found him, deceased.

Past Struggles

Monteith told Parade magazine in 2011 that he was “out of control” as a teen. He revealed that at age 13, he drank, smoked pot and skipped school in Victoria, British Columbia, after his parents divorced. By 16, his drug use had escalated. He was “doing anything and everything, as much as possible.” At 19, he entered rehab for the first time.

On March 31, 2013, the media announced that Monteith had admitted himself into a treatment facility for substance addiction. His treatment was completed on April 26, 2013.

Autopsy and Findings

An autopsy was completed by the British Columbia Coroners Service on July 15. The autopsy report stated that Monteith died from “a mixed drug toxicity” consisting of heroin and alcohol, and that his death appeared to have been accidental.

Heroin and Alcohol: a Deadly Combination

The drugs of abuse may give the user a feeling of pleasure, but it is important to remember that they are toxic substances. The vast majority of drug overdose cases involve the use of more than one drug. In 2003 the Drug Abuse Warning Network reported an average of 2.7 drugs in fatal overdose cases. Importantly in these cases, no single drug is usually present at a lethal dose. Rather it is the synergistic effect (think: 1+1=3) of the combining of drugs that is lethal. For example, a combination of heroin and alcohol can be especially dangerous. Heroin and alcohol both suppress breathing, but by different mechanisms.

Heroin is the cause for more deaths by overdose than any other single drug. The majority of these deaths ultimately result from respiratory failure. A toxic dose of heroin increases the inhibitory effect of GABA, which causes breathing to slow and eventually stop.

Alcohol overdoses occur predominantly in two ways. First, a high intake of alcohol causes unconsciousness. At high levels, it can also cause breathing to slow or cease. Second, the body tries to rid itself of unabsorbed alcohol by emptying the stomach. If a person vomits while they are unconscious, they may inhale the vomit and compromise their breathing or even drown.

Heroin and alcohol together is especially dangerous, experts say, because alcohol can exaggerate heroin’s effect on the central nervous system.

How Heroin and Alcohol Killed Cory Montieth

As with other cases where heroin and alcohol were involved, Cory’s death was likely an overdose of either alcohol, heroin or both, resulting in coma, brain damage and eventually death. Even if he had not taken a lethal amount of heroin, it proved to be deadly when he combined it with alcohol.

Drugs that depress that central nervous system slow the heartbeat, or in large enough doses, can stop it from beating entirely. Without oxygen-rich blood pumping to the body, brain cells become depleted and can die within minutes.

Heroin, a highly addictive opiate drug, is considered a depressant because of its effects sedating the central nervous system. Alcohol also functions as a depressant.

Combining these two depressants forms a deadly drug combination.

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.usatoday.com

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu

http://drugabuse.gov

www.nih.gov

Roxy, Oxy, and Opana

Roxy, Oxy, and Opana

Roxy, oxy and opana are pretty much the crème de la crème for opiate addicts. First it was oxy, then it was roxy, and more recently it has become opana. Opana abuse has increased recently because of the new formulation of roxy, oxy that keep users from being able to break down the pills and shoot them up. Roxy, oxy and opana are all very similar in their effects but roxy, oxy are essentially the same drug: oxycodone. Opana is oxymorphone.

Roxy, oxy and opana: Roxy, oxy

The active ingredient in roxy is oxycodone, so essentially roxy, oxy are one and the same. Oxycodone is also found in Percocet, OxyContin, OxyFast, etc. Some of these meds, such as roxy and oxy, are short acting, while OxyContin is a sustained release medication.

Oxy is an opiate medication prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. It bears much similarity to hydrocodone, which is most commonly known under the brand name Vicodin. However, oxycodone is believed to be more potent than hydrocodone, making it the drug of choice for many opiate abusers who take the drug for its euphoric effects. In high doses, it can cause shallow breathing, hypotension, circulatory collapse, respiratory arrest and death. Roxy is just one of the name brands of oxy.

Roxy, oxy and opana: Opana

The drug Opana, also known as Oxymorphone, is an opioid pain reliever which is similar to morphine. Reformulated OxyContin (oxy) pills make getting high harder, so opioid abusers are turning to Opana (oxymorphone) instead, according to a July 12, 2012, report in USA Today. As a result, the report added, Opana-related crime, including pharmacy robberies and overdose deaths, as well as treatment for oxymorphone addiction have been rising in several states.

Prior to August 2010, when Purdue Pharma reformulated OxyContin, opioid abusers could crush, break, or dissolve the pills in order to snort or inject the drug, which produces a more rapid high. The new formulation cannot be broken, crushed, or dissolved, so addicts must either take larger quantities of the drug or find another option. In Kentucky, according to USA Today, oxymorphone appeared as a factor in 23% of overdoses in 2011, up from just 2% in 2010. In nearby Ohio, the Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring Network reported in January 2012 that many opioid abusers said they were using oxymorphone as a replacement for oxy. This is not the first time oxymorphone abuse has been in the spotlight. According to a May 2011 intelligence brief from the Drug Enforcement Administration, oxymorphone abuse was popular during the early 1970s, when many who injected it considered it superior to heroin or morphine. The brief singled out New Castle, Delaware, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as present-day hot spots of oxymorphone abuse.

Other than a drug test, one can use the following symptoms to detect or roxy, oxy and opana abuse:

•Drowsiness, sometimes to the point of nodding off

•Sedation

•Euphoria

•Lightheadedness

•Itching

•Nausea and vomiting

•Constipation

•Low blood pressure

•Respiratory suppression

•Headache

•Dry mouth

•Sweating

Constricted pupils, although overdose may bring about dilated pupils.

Overdose deaths can occur due to respiratory suppression, especially when oxy, roxy, and opana or any opiate is combined with another drug that suppresses respiration, like another opiate, benzodiazepines or alcohol.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_difference_between_the_pain_medications_oxycodone_and_roxicodone

http://www.pharmacytimes.com/news/Reformulated-OxyContin-Leads-to-Increased-Opana-Abuse

Is it illegal to buy roxy online?

Is it illegal to buy roxy online?

Not only is it very illegal to buy roxy online without a prescription, but it also may be highly dangerous. Buying roxy online could land you in jail or it could land you in the hospital. When you buy roxy online you don’t know exactly what you are getting and if the online pharmacy you are using is legitimate. This puts into question exactly what kind of medication you are getting and if they are the medication you want, if it contains the right ingredients.

If you don’t end up in jail or the hospital from buying roxy online you quite possibly, are being ripped off. Most online pharmacies that allow you to buy roxy online are scams. These online pharmacies are just really smart ways of duping you out of your money and if you read the fine print on a lot of them they say they are not responsible for refunding your money and then they also have no contact information for you to call them, email them etc. If you want to buy roxy online, it is a bad idea all around. Just go to your local pharmacy.

Here is what the DEA has to say about trying to buy roxy online

http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/consumer_alert.htm

Federal law prohibits buying controlled substances such as narcotic pain relievers (e.g., OxyContin, Roxy, Vicodin), sedatives (e.g., Valium, Xanax, and Ambien), stimulants (e.g., phentermine, Adderall, Ritalin) and anabolic steroids (e.g., Winstrol, Equipoise) without a valid prescription from your doctor. This means there must be a real doctor-patient relationship, which by most state laws requires a physical examination. Prescriptions written by “cyber doctors” relying on online questionnaires are not legitimate under the law.

  • Buying controlled substances online without a valid prescription may be punishable by imprisonment under Federal law. Often drugs ordered from rogue websites come from foreign countries. It is a felony to import drugs into the United States and ship to a non-DEA registrant.

 

  • Buying drugs online may not be only illegal, but dangerous. The American Medical Association and state boards of medicine and pharmacy have all condemned the practice of cyber doctors issuing online prescriptions as unacceptable medical care. Drugs delivered by rogue websites may be the wrong drugs, adulterated or expired, the wrong dosage strength, or have no dosage directions or warnings.

All in all, there is no difference between going to a drug dealer on the street corner and buying illicit substances illegally and buying roxy online without a prescription. The same goes for if your prescription for roxys was obtained online because that is illegal also. If you want to buy roxy online, in an illegal way, you might as well just go hunt down the nearest painkiller dealer on the street; you will save the money on shipping and at least you know the pills are a bit more safe and that you will get your money’s worth. I am not recommending that you buy anything illegally, just making the comparison to open your eyes to what is really going on, there is no difference between buying roxy online and buying roxy on the street. If you have a legitimate prescription for roxy don’t risk it and go get your medicine from a local and respected pharmacy; don’t buy roxy online.

Opioids Are the Most Prescribed Drug in America

Opioids, commonly known as painkillers like Percocet, Vicodin, and Fentanyl, are becoming the most prescribed and abused drugs in America.

Prescription rate and statistics show that Opioids Are the Most Prescribed Drug in America.

Most prescription painkillers are prescribed by primary care and internal medicine doctors and dentists, not specialists. Roughly 20% of prescribers prescribe 80% of all prescription painkillers Dentists were the main prescribers for youth aged 10-19 years old. Nearly 46% of opioid prescriptions were given to patients between ages 40 and 59, and most of those were from primary care providers. The records show the trend that opioids are the most prescribed drug in America because approximately 56% of painkiller prescriptions were given to patients who had filled another prescription for pain from the same or different providers within the past month. In addition, nearly 12% of opioids prescribed were to young people aged 10-29, a nearly 20 year increase in the use of prescription painkillers. From 1991 to 2009, prescriptions for opioid painkillers increased almost threefold, to over 200 million, showing a trend that opioids are the most prescribed drug in America.

An analysis of national prescribing patterns shows that more than half of patients who received an opioid prescription in 2009 had filled another opioid prescription within the previous 30 days.

Misuse and Abuse

With the exponential increase in prescribing patterns, opioids are the most prescribed drug in America and more and more patients are abusing their prescription, meaning that they are taking more than what is prescribed to them. Indicators for this behavior include running out of their month’s supply before the original prescription is able to be re-filled, doctor-shopping (visiting different doctors) in order to obtain multiple prescriptions, getting prescriptions filled at different pharmacies so as not to raise any “red flags,” and even resorting to purchasing them illegally, either online, through an acquaintance, or off the street.

The misuse and abuse of prescription painkillers was responsible for more than 475,000 emergency department visits in 2009, a number that nearly doubled in just five years.

Overdose and deaths

Nearly three out of four prescription drug overdoses are caused by prescription painkillers. The unprecedented rise in overdose deaths in the U.S. parallels a 300% increase since 1999 in the sale of these medications, which were involved in 14,800 overdose deaths in 2008.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (the CDC), now that opioids are the most prescribed drug in America, prescription painkiller overdose is now the second leading cause of accidental death in the United States, killing more people than heroin and cocaine combined.

In 2010, nearly 60% of the drug overdose deaths involved pharmaceutical drugs. Opioid analgesics, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone, were involved in about 3 of every 4 pharmaceutical overdose deaths.

Men vs. Women

The CDC also finds that, although more men are dying of prescription drug overdoses, women are catching up. In the last 14 years, the percentage increase in deaths has been greater for women, spiking by 400% as opposed to 265% for men.

Being that opioids are the most prescribed drug in America, it is no wonder that access to these potent painkillers has gotten easier. A curious kid can gain access to opioid prescription pills simply by looking in their parents’ or grandparents’ medicine cabinets.

Sources:

http://www.cdc.gov

http://www.drugabuse.gov

http://oxywatchdog.com

http://www.cdc.gov/

What are Roxy pills?

roxy pills

A Roxy pill, or Roxicodone, is a brand name for the generic drug, Oxycodone. It is a narcotic painkiller. Roxicodone pills are also called Roxy pills, Roxy’s, Roxies (or any variation of spelling), blueberries, blues, 30s (for the 30 milligram strength).

Roxy pills are currently among the most abused drugs. Statistics show that Roxy pills and other narcotics like it are mostly abused by people ranging from 16 to 49 years old with some as young as 12 years old having at least tried one of these painkillers in a recreational way. Painkillers like Roxy pills are becoming the first go-to drug for recreational use, being “experimented with” even before marijuana and cocaine.

Roxy pills are pure opioid (synthetically produced opiate), meaning they do not contain aspirin or Tylenol like other narcotics of the same drug classification. Roxy pills are a Schedule II drug. Other drugs in this class include Methadone, Oxycodone (Percocet), Hydrocodone (Vicodin) and many, many others. There are a few different pills that are narcotic pain killers in pill form. There is Roxicet, also called Tylox, Roxanol (also called Morphine), Roxicodone (Percocet without the Tylenol). Anyone of these narcotic pain killers are strong, require a prescription, and could be called “Roxie.” These drugs are prescribed for moderate to severe pain.

Side effects while taking Roxy pills include respiratory depression, meaning breathing is slowed or may even stop if overdose occurs; hypotension, or low blood pressure; sweating; anxiety; sleepiness; itchiness; urinary difficulty/urinary tract infection; physical dependence; loss of appetite; dizziness; dry mouth; headaches and migraines.

And because of their potency, many people abuse Roxy pills for the euphoric “high” they experience. The ways in which Roxy pills are abused include being eaten (slang for swallowed), snorted/sniffed, smoked (as in free-based), slammed/banged/shot (slang terms for injected).

Signs of use and abuse of Roxy pills include “doctor shopping” and having multiple prescriptions; raiding medicine cabinets, medications going missing; always out of money; irritability; “pinned” pupils; agitated or restless behaviors; secretive behaviors such as hiding medications, isolation, and withdrawal from social activities; extreme and/or rapid weight loss.

Signs and outcome of overdose of Roxy pills include seizures, slowed or cessation of breath, hospitalization, coma, and death.

Those who take Roxy pills long term and suddenly stop will more than likely experience opioid abstinence syndrome, or simply “(the) withdrawals:” extreme flu-like symptoms such as sweats/night sweats, chills, diarrhea, vomiting, and body aches. In addition, people going through withdrawals from Roxy pills experience runny nose, sneezing, yawning, goose bumps, insomnia, restless limbs (aka “the
jerks,” “the jimmies”), and lethargy. As if these were not bad enough, withdrawal from Roxy pills also involves psychological symptoms including (increased) anxiety and depression, irritability, mood swings, and an overall extreme lack of will to do anything, including self-care like brushing your teeth and showering. Basically hell on earth. I always knew that the dreaded withdrawal onslaught from Roxy pills was coming when I’d wake up with what I called “dewy eyes” – during the night, my night sweats would have begun and that sweat would then pool in the corners of my eyes. When I awoke in this way, it only took a few minutes for the full-on effect of the withdrawals to begin. Worst.feeling.ever.

Sources:

www.detoxanswers.com

www.wiki.answers.com

www.wikipedia.org

www.nih.gov

www.prescriptiondrugabuse.org