Oxycodone Withdrawal Symptoms

Oxycodone Withdrawal Symptoms

Oxycodone withdrawal symptoms are described as some of the worst withdrawal symptoms in the opiate family. The reason for this is because oxycodone is a fast acting, short lasting medication for intense and chronic pain to help improve quality of life. Oxycodone is usually prescribed for those with cancer, and for those who have been in some sort of accident or have had some kind of surgery that leaves them in chronic pain.

Oxycodone was manufactured in Germany in 1916 and is a derivative of the drugs morphine and heroin. Oxycodone has many of the same effects as heroin and is just as addictive. It tends to be more socially accepted in comparison with heroin because it is a medication not an illicit drug. Some of the street names for oxycodone are “hillbilly heroin, blues, OC’s, Oxys, pills, OC 80’s”. Just as with heroin, oxycodone is extremely habit forming and you do not have to be taking the drug recreationally; you can also be prescribed oxycodone and become physically dependent.

Taking oxycodone regularly can cause you to build a tolerance as with most opiates. This is because oxycodone attaches itself to the opiate receptors in the brain causing a change in brain chemistry. This tolerance causes a user to need more and more oxycodone to continue getting the desired pain relieving effects or “high”.

A user who is taking oxycodone for recreational purposes is trying to achieve a “high” much like heroin. Oxycodone can be snorted, taken orally or injected. The effects of taking this drug recreationally can range from intense euphoria, drowsiness, all the way to hyperactivity. After a certain period of time, whether oxycodone has been taken recreationally or as prescribed; a user will become physically dependent. How long it takes to become physically dependent on oxycodone depends on the person, how much they have been taking and for what length of time they have been taking oxycodone. After a user becomes physically dependent on oxycodone, if they rapidly decrease their use or stop “cold turkey” they will inevitably experience oxycodone withdrawal symptoms. These oxycodone withdrawal symptoms can begin a few hours after stopping use and last weeks; this can vary from person to person. Oxycodone withdrawal symptoms are not fatal although they are very painful, extremely uncomfortable and frightening.

Here are some examples of what to expect from oxycodone withdrawal symptoms, these can vary and are not limited to:

  • Abnormal skin sensations
  • Aches and pains
  • Anxiety
  • Cold- or flu-like symptoms
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Goose bumps
  • Headaches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Mood swings
  • Nausea
  • Pain
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Rigid muscles
  • Runny nose
  • Seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there
  • Shivering or tremors
  • Sleeping difficulties
  • Sneezing
  • Sweating
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Vomiting

If a user is experiencing any of these oxycodone withdrawal symptoms they may think it’s a better idea to just continue using oxycodone rather than deal with the withdrawal symptoms. This leads to a longer period of habitual oxycodone use. It is recommended that a user who is experiencing any oxycodone withdrawal symptoms seek outside help from a medical detox or healthcare professional even though the symptoms are not fatal. There are medications now to ease the pain of oxycodone withdrawal and a medical detox will allow for the most comfortable oxycodone withdrawal that is available. Withdrawal from any drug is extremely frightening, so seek help.

Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms

Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms           

Methadone is a synthetic opioid used for the maintenance of patients with opiate addiction.  Methadone is mainly used in the involvement of stopping or reducing the use of illicit drugs such as heroin and morphine although it also used in the treatment of chronic pain. While this is the case it has been found to be used recreationally for those with opiate addiction.

Methadone addiction is common because it is readily and easily available at methadone clinics. Clinics are where a user may go for the maintenance of their illicit opiate addiction. There they will receive methadone doses for a small payment each day legally. Just because methadone is legal whereas heroin is not, does not mean it is any less addictive or dangerous. The death toll from methadone use has spiked upward dramatically since 1999, with there being about 3,849 known in 2004 compared to 790 in 1999. Mixing methadone with other drugs such as benzodiazepines can be extremely dangerous also.

Methadone is highly physically addictive just as any other opiate. Methadone’s effects can last up to 35 hours and can remain in the body for days. This makes it prime for the maintenance of opiate addiction but also extremely hard to quit. That’s because when stopping methadone use there are going to be methadone withdrawal symptoms. The physical changes in the body after using methadone for a period of time are similar to those when using heroin or any other opiates.

To know if you are going to have methadone withdrawal symptoms, you can look for signs of methadone addiction. Signs of methadone addiction are pinpointed or contracted pupils, drowsiness, constipation, and suppressed breathing or cough reflex. If you or someone you know has been taking methadone for a long period of time and has these signs they most likely are going to go through methadone withdrawal symptoms once they stop their methadone use. Methadone withdrawal symptoms are extremely uncomfortable and while they are not fatal it is very frightening. It can become psychologically as well as physically painful. Methadone withdrawal symptoms can vary based on age, gender, how much or how little you have been using and usually consist of;

  • Physical Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms:
  • Lightheadedness
  • Tearing
  • Runny nose
  • Yawning
  • Sneezing
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Severe Itching
  • Fever
  • Sweating
  • Chills
  • Tremors
  • Aches and pains, often in the joints and/or legs
  • Elevated pain sensitivity
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Reduced breathing (may be fatal between 2–4 hours)

 

  • Psychological Methadone Withdrawal Symptoms:
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Susceptibility to Cravings
  • Depression
  • Prolonged insomnia
  • Delirium
  • Auditory hallucinations
  • Visual hallucinations
  • Increased perception of odors, real or imagined
  • Marked decrease in sex drive
  • Agitation
  • Anxiety
  • Panic disorder
  • Paranoia
  • Delusions

Methadone withdrawal symptoms have shown to be up to twice as severe as those of morphine or heroin and are last a significant more amount of time; methadone withdrawal symptoms can last for several weeks or more. At high methadone doses, sudden cessation of therapy can result in methadone withdrawal symptoms described as “the worst withdrawal imaginable,” lasting from weeks to months.

 

 

 

The Dangers of Buying Prescription Medication Online

 

prescription medications online

There are so many dangers of buying prescription medication online and you can probably think of a few right off the top of your head right now. The most obvious being you don’t have a trusted pharmacist giving or checking your drugs. That is an obvious one but we are going to tell you some of the immediate problems with buying prescription medication online.

 

Where can you buy prescription medication online?

Normally prescription medication is bought at “online pharmacies”. Online pharmacies are websites that sell prescription and over-the-counter drugs that may or may not be safe to use and could put your health at risk. The best ways to avoid the dangers of buying prescription medication online are to be able to recognize legal internet pharmacies or just go to your local pharmacy.

 

Dangers of buying prescription medication online

Buying prescription medication online from a company you don’t know means you don’t know what you will be getting. There are multiple online pharmacies that operate legally and they offer conveniences, privacy and safeguards for buying medicines. But there also tons of “shady websites” that offer to sell potentially dangerous prescription medicines that have not been checked for safety or effectiveness. These “rogue websites” will look professional and they will also look legitimate, all the while they are an illegal operating online pharmacy and there are numerous dangers of buying prescription medicine from them. Dangerous online pharmacies selling prescription medication online will most often sell unapproved medicines or medicines that contain the wrong active ingredients. Some of the other dangers of buying prescription medication online are that online pharmacies will also sell drugs that contain too little or too much of the active ingredient too.

Many people who buy prescription medication online instead of receiving the drug they ordered, they received products containing what was identified as foreign versions of their drug. As a result these people had to seek medical treatment for their symptoms which could have ended up deadly.

One of the biggest dangers of buying prescription medication online is that the websites will sell counterfeit drugs that look exactly like the real FDA-approved medicines but the quality and safety of the drugs are totally unknown.

If you are going to buy prescription medication online here are some ways to make sure you aren’t in any danger:

  • If the online pharmacy is located in the United States
  • It is a licensed online pharmacy by the state board of pharmacy where the website is operating. You can find the list of boards on the Internet by searching for the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy.
  • It has a licensed pharmacist available to answer your questions
  • It requires a prescription for prescription medications from your doctor or another health care profession who is licensed to prescribe medicines.
  • It provides contact information and allows you to talk to a person if you have problems or questions.

Here are some of the ways to spot a dangerous online pharmacy:

  • It sends you drugs with unknown quality and/or origin
  • It gives you the wrong drug or another dangerous product for your illness
  • It doesn’t provide any way to contact the website by phone
  • It may offer to sell prescription drugs without a prescription-this is illegal
  • It may or may not protect your personal information
  • It offers prices significantly cheaper than the competition

The dangers of buying prescription medications online all lie in the fact that the drugs could be counterfeit or contaminated. This is why you should know your medicines before buying from an online pharmacy. Counterfeit drugs can be contaminated, lead to dangerous side effects, contain the wrong active ingredient, be made with the wrong amounts of ingredients, or contain no active ingredient or not enough of it. All of this can be very dangerous to you who need the medicine. These are the problems and dangers of buying prescription medication online.

Source:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/buying-prescription-drugs-online/GA00042

Roxicodone Addiction in Women

Roxicodone Addiction in Women

Roxicodone is prescribed for the treatment of severe pain. The primary ingredient in Roxicodone is oxycodone which provides pain relief for extreme pain and also provides the individual with a sense of relaxation and euphoria. The pleasurable sensations of roxicodone are what causes them to cross the line between taking roxicodone and having a roxicodone addiction. Roxicodone can be chewed, injected, swallowed, or snorted.  Street names of roxicodone include roxi, roxies, Blue, Hillbilly Heroin, Kicker, and Poor Man’s Heroin.  Though roxicodone typically comes in the form of a pill, it can also be crushed up into a white powder or dissolved in water.

Roxicodone addiction in women is similar to roxicodone addiction for everyone else. In order to maintain a level of pain relief, relaxation, and euphoria that the woman has come to rely on, she must either increase how often she uses roxicodone or increase the amount she uses each time. In addition to this drug abuse a woman with a roxicodone addiction may also have some of the following symptoms such as:

  • A decrease in motivation
  • Irritable behavior
  • Irrational thoughts
  • Loss of energy
  • Increased sleepiness
  • Loss of appetite

Physical Effects – A roxicodone addiction can physically compromise the normal behaviors of the body by interfering with various mechanisms.  Here are some negative physical consequences resulting from using Roxicodone:

  • Dizziness or lack of stability
  • Loss of appetite
  • Dry mouth
  • Compromised mental function
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Liver damage
  • Death due to accidental overdose

Psychological Effects – A roxicodone addiction can also have negative impacts on mental health.  Here are some negative psychological and mental effects from abusing roxicodone:

  • Altered perception of reality
  • Personality shifts
  • Low self-esteem, negative body image
  • Feelings of anger, rage
  • Increased anxiety
  • Mood swings
  • Depression
  • Confusion, disorientation
  • Paranoia

Social Effects – The abuse of roxicodone can result in multiple negative social effects.  These can include the following:

  • Withdrawal, isolation from friends and family
  • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
  • Damaged relationships with loved ones
  • Division or brokenness within a family unit

The DEA reports that 1.9 million Americans have taken roxicodone for illicit use. The FDA reports that oxycodone played a role in 464 deaths across the United States in one year.

The issues and situations that contribute to a woman’s roxicodone addiction are different than those for men. There may be some genetic factors that are linked to roxicodone addiction in women, and this would be a biological reason for an addiction to roxicodone. But for roxicodone addiction and women it might also be an attempt to “numb” emotional pain caused from psychological trauma, feelings of anxiety or depression, or instances of abuse.  In these cases, these would be psychological causes of an addiction to roxicodone.  Finally, societal or environmental situations, such as the pressure of being a mother can increase the likelihood that woman might abuse roxicodone. 

The reasons behind roxicodone addiction in women are less important than how they can get help and luckily there are women’s treatment centers that can combat roxicodone addiction specifically in women with their unique issues.

 

 

http://www.michaelshouse.com/oxycodone-addiction/how-oxycodone-addiction-begins/

 

 

Opana Abuse

Opana Abuse

Opana abuse is just the newest phase of what is officially the painkiller epidemic. Before opana abuse it was OxyContin. Opana is on the rise and has overtaken OxyContin as the most popular drug for painkiller abusers. The CDC has classified the abuse of painkillers as an epidemic because of the 1.3 million ER visits in 2010 which is a 115% increase since 2004. Not only had that but overdose deaths from opiates surpassed deaths from heroin and cocaine for the first time in 2008. And opana abuse is just the newest and most recent thing to hit the streets recently. Opana abuse made its debut after the makers of OxyContin made it hard for drug users to crush and inject it.

Opana is another name for the generic drug known as oxymorphone. Opana is also known as Opana ER and Numorphone HCI. Opana is a narcotic pain reliever that treats moderate to severe pain; Opana ER is the extended release version which treats chronic long lasting pain.

Opana is very habit forming and has a high potential for abuse. Opana abuse or just taking Opana for a long period of time can lead to the development of a tolerance, addiction and overdose. Once a person becomes physically addicted to Opana they will suffer from withdrawal symptoms if they stop taking the drug abruptly.

Opanas are knows as blues, biscuits, octagons, stop signs, pink, pink heaven, Mrs O, Orgasna IR, OM, Pink O, The O bomb and other street names. Like other painkillers, opana causes feelings of euphoria, well-being, increased sociability and similar effects that make it desirable to abuse.

What is Opana abuse?

The signs of opana abuse are similar to the signs of prescription drug abuse in general. Opana can be easily gotten from pharmacies, hospitals and by those with prescriptions. If an individual doesn’t have a prescription it can be bought on the street or sold illicitly. Some common signs of opana abuse are:

  • Doctor shopping to get more than one prescription for opana
  • Fake call-ins for refills
  • Stealing prescription pads and forging prescriptions

Opana abuse includes overusing the drug, tampering with the medication such as crushing it up and snorting it or shooting it up. Opana abuse also includes mixing it with other drugs to heighten the effects. Opana is extremely dangerous when mixed with other drugs because it is so potent and can easily lead to overdose and in the worst case scenario; death. Some dangerous drug combinations when mixed with opana abuse are:

  • Alcohol
  • Sedatives
  • Tranquilizers
  • Other opiates

Signs and symptoms of an opana overdose are:

  • Lethargy
  • Relaxed muscles
  • Respiratory depression
  • Low blood pressure
  • Coma
  • Cardiac and respiratory collapse
  • Death

Opana abuse, addiction and overdose are up and coming as law enforcement and health professionals begin to see more and more effects of the drugs. Opana abuse is a new and deadly trend in illicit drug use. There is good news though, opana abuse is treatable and no one has to die from it. With the use of a detox facility and treatment an addiction opana or opana abuse can be eliminated and treated.

Source: http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-07-10/opana-painkiller-addiction/56137086/1