Roxicodone Abuse

Roxicodone Abuse

Roxicodone Abuse

Roxicodone (oxycodone hydrochloride) is a highly addictive opioid based analgesic pain-killer with an extreme potential for abuse. Tablets come in two strengths, 15 mg or 30 mg, designed for oral administration and each contain oxycodone hydrochloride. Oxycodone hydrochloride is a white crystalline powdered substance which derives from opium alkaloid, thebaine.

Roxicodone or Oxycodone hydrochloride is manufactured for the purpose of managing pain of patients who suffer from moderate to severe physical or chronic pain. The pain managing ingredients in Roxicodone (oxycodone) is a semi-synthetic opiate similar to its more natural cousin morphine.

Roxicodone stimulates a chemical pathway in the brain known as the dopamine pathway. Dopamine is a natural chemical used by the brain to prepare someone to experience something pleasurable or good. When a user takes roxicodone, the body releases dopamine in response, and that reaction is often in proportion to the amount of drugs the person takes. In the beginning, a person can take Roxicodone and feel a flood of dopamine, experiencing euphoria and extreme happiness as a result. Over time, however, the body will begin to adjust to its internal chemistry, and the person has to take higher doses of Roxicodone to feel the same result. This is the beginning of Roxicodone abuse.

People who abuse roxicodone often crush the tablets, mix them with water and inject the solution into their veins. This allows the drug to move directly into the user’s bloodstream, and the effects of the drug are often felt within minutes when users try this method. The effects of roxicodone abuse usually last between 4-6 hours.

People who abuse roxicodone may find that they experience withdrawal symptoms between hits of the medication or when they try to stop using roxicodone all together. Their bodies are no longer producing dopamine and other chemicals without the help from roxicodone, and the body needs those chemicals to function normally. These withdrawal symptoms can vary from person to person, but they most generally include:

  • Agitation or restlessness
  • Watery eyes
  • Sweating
  • Shaking
  • Stomach pain or nausea

The signs of roxicodone abuse are fairly easy to spot. The first and most common sign of anyone involved with roxicodone abuse is pin point pupils. This means their pupils are very small even in the light; they don’t dilate. People who are abusing roxicodone might also seem extremely relaxed or sedated, falling asleep while talking or wandering about in a bit of a daze. This waking and sleeping state is known as nodding off by those who abuse roxicodone. In addition, the roxicodone addict might ask for money or steal household items in order to raise money to buy drugs. The addict might see multiple doctors, all in a row, trying to get multiple prescriptions for roxicodone. The roxicodone abuser might also begin to miss school or work because he or she is too intoxicated to attend. All of these are signs of roxicodone abuse.

Roxicodone abuse is very dangerous and has a high potential for an overdose and even death. Luckily there are many solutions for roxicodone abuse today. So anyone who wants to stop using roxicodone can.

Sources: http://www.dependency.net/learn/roxicodone/

Q&A: Can Roxicodone interact with other medications or foods?

Like any other drug, Roxicodone can interact with other medications and food. It’s important to take note of these interactions before combining Roxicodone with other prescription medications. There are over 900 separate medications that can interact with Roxicodone. Roxicodone can also interact with certain foods. Here is a list of the major interactions of Roxicodone.

1. Alcohol: The combination of alcohol or medications containing alcohol, and Roxicodone can be deadly. Alcohol and Roxicodone interact in a way that potentiates the effect of both. When Roxicodone and alcohol are combined, their effects increase exponentially. 98% of reported opiate overdoses have included the co-use of alcohol and/or other central nervous system depressants.

2. Alvimopan: Roxicodone may increase the risk of serious alvimopan side effects. You should not take alvimopan if you have taken Roxicodone for each of the past seven days.

3. Antidepressants: Combining antidepressants with Roxicodone could increase your risk of side effects, such as drowsiness, confusion, memory loss, or difficulty breathing.

4. Antihistamines: Many antihistamines cause significant drowsiness and can cause serious problems when used in combination with other medications that cause drowsiness, such as Roxicodone. Taking an antihistamine with Roxicodone may also increase the risks of other side effects (such as constipation or difficulty passing urine).

5. Antipsychotics: Combining an antipsychotic medication with Roxicodone can increase your risk of side effects, such as drowsiness, confusion, memory loss, or difficulty breathing.

6. Barbiturates: Combining a barbiturate with Roxicodone can increase your risk of side effects, such as drowsiness, confusion, memory loss, or difficulty breathing.

7. Benzodiazepines: Taking Roxicodone in combination with a benzodiazepine might increase your risk of side effects, such as drowsiness, confusion, memory loss, or difficulty breathing.

8. Grapefruit Juice: Grapefruit blocks the effect of the enzyme CYP3A4 which is concentrated mostly in the liver, and it is responsible for the breakdown of certain drugs, including Roxicodone. This causes an increase in Roxicodone concentration, which can cause serious reactions.

9. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs): Combining Roxicodone with an MAOI can cause serious reactions. Do not use Roxicodone and an MAOI within 14 days of each other.

10. Muscle Relaxants: Taking Roxicodone with a muscle relaxant may increase the risk of side effects due to both medications.

11. Other Narcotics or Opioids: Use extreme caution when combining Roxicodone with other narcotics or opioids, as serious side effects could occur.

12. Sleep Medications: Roxicodone can cause significant drowsiness, and combining it with a sleep medication could lead to dangerous effects. In general, Roxicodone should not be used in combination with sleep medications.

This is by no means a comprehensive list of all the interactions between Roxicodone and other medications or food. Medication interactions are no joke, and with a powerful drug like Roxicodone, you could have some serious side effects, including difficulty breathing, coma, and death. Even some herbal medications can interact with Roxicodone, so take the necessary precautions! Your best bet is to check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking Roxicodone with anything else.

Source:

http://back-pain.emedtv.com/oxycodone/oxycodone-drug-interactions.html

 

Q&A: How do Roxies Affect Your Brain?

Roxicodone

What are roxies?

Roxies are also called Roxicodone. Roxicodone, sometimes spelled “Roxycodone,” is a potent narcotic pain reliever that blocks the perception of pain by binding to opiate receptors in the brain and body. Roxycodone is recommended for treating moderate to severe pain or to sedate a patient prior to surgery. The recommended adult dose of Roxycodone can vary depending on the patient’s response, his or her weight and size and the severity of pain. Roxycodone is the brand name for oxycodone, available in immediate-release tablets. The drug Roxycodone, is an opioid, meaning that while it’s a powerful tool in the battle for pain management, it also has a tendency to be habit-forming.

How do roxies affect your brain?

When you are in pain your brain is sending off messages. Specific parts of the brain get excited and tell your body you are in pain. Roxies keep this from happening.

Roxies alter your perception and emotional response to pain by binding to opioid receptors in the central nervous system. Roxies affect the brain by acting the same way any other opioid does.

Roxies bind to specific receptors in the brain that deal with pain and pleasure. These receptors are known as mu, kappa, and delta receptors. When roxies bind to these receptors it keeps the neurons from getting excited and telling your brain you are in pain and instead tells your brain you feel good. Roxies decrease the excitability or response of those neurons and also blocks them from sending the messages of pain.

Opiate agonists like roxies do not completely alter the brain though, just the parts of the brain that perceive pain and pleasure. This is what makes them so effective. Roxies can relieve pain without causing a loss consciousness. The reason for this is because roxies alter the perception of pain in higher levels in the central nervous system as well as altering your emotional response to the pain in the pleasure centers. This is what results in the pain relief and the euphoria that many recreational users of roxies experience. This is also what makes roxies highly addictive. Especially for someone who has been taking roxies for a long period of time, they have altered their pain or opiate receptors to the point that now the brain is no longer dealing with pain on its own but is reliant on the medication. Through constant stimulation of key pleasure centers within the brain, and its reward system, opiate users are conditioned to want more of the drug.

Roxies may not affect the brain entirely, only the pain and pleasure receptors but they do affect other parts of the brain and nervous system. For instance, in addition to pain relief, roxies stop the cough reflex, slows breathing and causes the pupils to shrink. Roxies also have the ability to lower body temperature. The two biggest affects roxies have on the nervous system are:

  • Suppressed cough – Roxies are also a cough suppressant. Roxies suppress the cough reflex because they affect the cough center in the medulla. The medulla is located in the brain and controls breathing etc.
  • Respiratory depression -Roxies also cause respiratory depression or decreased breathing because it directly affects the brain stem’s respiratory centers. This is when overdose from roxies happen. Slowed breathing reduces the responsiveness of the brain stem respiratory centers. By doing this it compounds on itself and cause death.

Restless Leg Syndrome

Restless Leg Syndrome

Restless Leg Syndrome

Ever wonder why they call it “kicking” a heroin or Roxy addiction? It’s because of a really common symptom of opioid withdrawal known as restless leg syndrome. When you have restless leg syndrome, you usually have to literally kick your legs to relieve the tingling feeling.

Restless Leg Syndrome: What is it?

Restless leg syndrome is a neurological disorder that causes you to have urges to move your body to stop uncomfortable or odd sensations. It most commonly affects the legs, but it can affect the arms, torso, head, and back. Moving the body temporarily relieved the sensations.

The sensations can feel like itchiness, cramping, numbness, aching, burning, or tugging. They can last for up to an hour or more. The feelings are usually worse when you try to lie down or relax.

Restless Leg Syndrome: The dangers

Dealing with restless leg syndrome can have an impact on your life. If you can’t sleep because of restless leg syndrome, it can impact your ability to function the next day. Insomnia can also suck much of the enjoyment out of life. Your mental and physical well-being can be compromised. This is especially dangerous for people who are trying to quit a Roxy addiction.

Dealing with restless leg syndrome can cause feelings of exhaustion and depression. It isn’t in and of itself a life-threatening condition, but it can take a toll on mental and physical faculties.

Restless Leg Syndrome: Causes

Restless leg syndrome can be caused by a number of conditions including:

Benzodiazepine and opiate withdrawal

– Peripheral neuropathy which can occur in people who have chronically abused alcohol and have nutritional deficiencies as a result

– Parkinson’s disease

– Iron deficiency

– Chronic kidney disease

– Pregnancy

– Side effect of medications including some anticonvulsants and antipsychotics

Restless Leg Syndrome: Treatment

Unfortunately, there is no cure for restless leg syndrome. However, there are some things you can do to relieve your symptoms. First and foremost, if you are experiencing restless leg syndrome, consult a doctor. They will be able to rule out any underlying medical conditions that could be causing the condition. If there is no underlying cause or if it is caused by withdrawal or medication, here are some things you can do to help:

Find ways to manage stressful situations, because stress tends to exacerbate the symptoms of restless leg syndrome.

Relaxation techniques such as meditation can ease the symptoms.

Warm baths can give you some relief from restless leg syndrome.

Taking a multivitamin can help.

Exercise has been shown to help a person struggling with restless leg syndrome.

Restless Leg Syndrome: Addiction Recovery

If a person is experiencing restless leg syndrome as a result of drug or alcohol withdrawal, the condition will usually resolve itself. If it doesn’t, this usually means that something else is going on, and you should consult a doctor. Once the dopamine levels in the brain readjust, the symptoms of restless leg syndrome should dissipate. In the meantime, you can reduce the symptoms of restless leg syndrome by exercising and taking a nutritional supplement.

Source:

http://alcoholrehab.com/alcohol-rehab/restless-leg-syndrome/

Vicodin Addiction

Vicodin Addiction

Vicodin Addiction

According to the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, more than 23 million adults and children over the age of 12 had taken some form of hydrocodone at least once in their lifetime for nonmedical purposes.

Doctors will very often prescribe Vicodin to patient for the relief of moderate to severe pain. Vicodin is a combo of hydrocodone (an opiate) and acetaminophen (the stuff that is in your Tylenol). Vicodin works by blocking the pain receptors in the brain, but it also creates a sense of euphoria in its users. This makes Vicodin work really well for pain but it also makes it super addictive. Who doesn’t want to feel good? That is what euphoria is. Unfortunately that is the thought that many people with a Vicodin addiction have.

People who take Vicodin will usually feel a rush of euphoria and relaxation. Not only that but any physical pain they are feeling begins to diminish. Over time, people who use Vicodin develop a tolerance for it. What is a tolerance? A tolerance means they need more and more Vicodin to achieve the same euphoria and pain relief as before. Many people with a Vicodin addiction can take anywhere from 20 to 30 pills a day and sometimes more. When someone with a Vicodin addiction begins taking that many pills they usually will start to show signs of Vicodin addiction. Here are some signs and symptoms of Vicodin addiction:

  • Drowsiness
  • An obsession with using and getting Vicodin
  • An inability to focus
  • Extreme anxiety and paranoia
  • Severe mood swings
  • Nausea and vomiting

Those with a Vicodin addiction usually will start “doctor shopping” or using manipulation, fraud and lies to get more and more of it. Because of the obsession with Vicodin all of their normal responsibilities in life become second to getting more Vicodin and their professional, personal and financial situations begin to fall apart. These are just a few of the effects of a Vicodin addiction though; there are so many other negative consequences to a Vicodin addiction. For instance some effects of Vicodin use are:

  • Itching
  • Swelling
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Vomiting and upset stomach

Vicodin use and Vicodin addiction can cause some medical issues if used for a long period of time. For instance, long term Vicodin use can cause liver damage, liver failure, jaundice, and urinary system issues. Also, because Vicodin is a central nervous system depressant it naturally decreases heart rate and breathing rate. This is especially true if taken in large doses by those with a Vicodin addiction. Those with a Vicodin addiction are at a high risk of overdose. Overdose occurs when someone takes a dose of Vicodin that is too much for them or if they mix Vicodin with another type of central nervous system depressant such as alcohol, other opiates, benzodiazepines, or barbiturates.

Another one of the problems with Vicodin addiction other than the effects and the risk of overdose are the withdrawal symptoms should the person with the Vicodin addiction every try to stop taking them. Withdrawal symptoms from a Vicodin addiction can be very unpleasant and most likely will require an inpatient or outpatient detox to help make more comfortable. Luckily though there is treatment for Vicodin addiction in the form of Vicodin detox and Vicodin drug treatment. For those that finally want to beat their Vicodin addiction they can seek help from a facility that specialize in getting people off their medicine once and for all.

Vicodin Addiction

According to the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, more than 23 million adults and children over the age of 12 had taken some form of hydrocodone at least once in their lifetime for nonmedical purposes.

Doctors will very often prescribe Vicodin to patient for the relief of moderate to severe pain. Vicodin is a combo of hydrocodone (an opiate) and acetaminophen (the stuff that is in your Tylenol). Vicodin works by blocking the pain receptors in the brain, but it also creates a sense of euphoria in its users. This makes Vicodin work really well for pain but it also makes it super addictive. Who doesn’t want to feel good? That is what euphoria is. Unfortunately that is the thought that many people with a Vicodin addiction have.

People who take Vicodin will usually feel a rush of euphoria and relaxation. Not only that but any physical pain they are feeling begins to diminish. Over time, people who use Vicodin develop a tolerance for it. What is a tolerance? A tolerance means they need more and more Vicodin to achieve the same euphoria and pain relief as before. Many people with a Vicodin addiction can take anywhere from 20 to 30 pills a day and sometimes more. When someone with a Vicodin addiction begins taking that many pills they usually will start to show signs of Vicodin addiction. Here are some signs and symptoms of Vicodin addiction:

  • Drowsiness
  • An obsession with using and getting Vicodin
  • An inability to focus
  • Extreme anxiety and paranoia
  • Severe mood swings
  • Nausea and vomiting

Those with a Vicodin addiction usually will start “doctor shopping” or using manipulation, fraud and lies to get more and more of it. Because of the obsession with Vicodin all of their normal responsibilities in life become second to getting more Vicodin and their professional, personal and financial situations begin to fall apart. These are just a few of the effects of a Vicodin addiction though; there are so many other negative consequences to a Vicodin addiction. For instance some effects of Vicodin use are:

  • Itching
  • Swelling
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Vomiting and upset stomach

Vicodin use and Vicodin addiction can cause some medical issues if used for a long period of time. For instance, long term Vicodin use can cause liver damage, liver failure, jaundice, and urinary system issues. Also, because Vicodin is a central nervous system depressant it naturally decreases heart rate and breathing rate. This is especially true if taken in large doses by those with a Vicodin addiction. Those with a Vicodin addiction are at a high risk of overdose. Overdose occurs when someone takes a dose of Vicodin that is too much for them or if they mix Vicodin with another type of central nervous system depressant such as alcohol, other opiates, benzodiazepines, or barbiturates.

Another one of the problems with Vicodin addiction other than the effects and the risk of overdose are the withdrawal symptoms should the person with the Vicodin addiction every try to stop taking them. Withdrawal symptoms from a Vicodin addiction can be very unpleasant and most likely will require an inpatient or outpatient detox to help make more comfortable. Luckily though there is treatment for Vicodin addiction in the form of Vicodin detox and Vicodin drug treatment. For those that finally want to beat their Vicodin addiction they can seek help from a facility that specialize in getting people off their medicine once and for all.

Source: http://addiction.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Signs_of_Vicodin_Addiction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Methadone Maintenance Program Pro’ss and Con’s

Methadone Treatments

Methadone maintenance programs are highly controversial. On the one hand, methadone maintenance programs have proven effective in reducing drug-related crime and overdoses in urban areas. On the other, many experts contend that methadone maintenance programs are simply replacing one addiction with another and that they do very little to treat the primary problem.

Methadone is a synthetic agent that works by “occupying” the brain receptor sites affected by heroin and other opiates. Unlike most opiates that are abused, it has long-acting effects, therefore, once a person gets used to the dose, it will cause less euphoria. Also, if a short term opiate is used while on methadone, it will block the effects.

Methadone Maintenance Programs: Pros

  • Reduced or stopped use of injection drugs.
  • Reduced risk of overdose and of acquiring and transmitting disease such as HIV, hepatitis B or C, bacterial infections, endocarditis, soft tissue infections, thrombophlebitis, tuberculosis, and STD’s.
  • Reduced mortality. The median death rate of opiate-dependent individuals in methadone maintenance programs is 30 percent of the rate of those not in a program.
  • Possible reduction in sexual risk behaviors, although evidence is conflicting.
  • Reduced criminal activity.
  • Improved family stability and employment potential.
  • Improved pregnancy outcomes.

Methadone Maintenance Programs: Cons

  • Methadone maintenance programs are a corrective, not a curative treatment for heroin and other opiate addiction.
  • Studies have shown that good outcomes are based on a treatment length on one year or more, but most patients in methadone maintenance programs leave before one year either because they drop out, the clinic encourages them to leave, or they are discharged for not complying.
  • Most methadone maintenance program patients continue using other drugs like heroin, cocaine, and alcohol after admission.
  • Methadone maintenance programs do not address any of the underlying issues behind drug use.
  • Methadone maintenance programs merely substitute one addiction for the other.
  • When a person tries to get off of methadone, they usually experience terrible, even life-threatening, withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal can last significantly longer on methadone than withdrawal from heroin and other opiates. It can take several months.
  • Methadone itself can be a highly unstable drug, and even though it shows less mortality than heroin, there is still a relatively high risk for overdose, especially when methadone is combined with other drugs.
  • Methadone maintenance programs enforce significant restrictions, designed to prevent abuse, so most patients must go to the clinic every day or several times a week to receive their medication. This can create problems for patients who need to travel, work or arrange childcare. It can also expose people to the risk of employment discrimination, because asking for time off to visit a methadone clinic is still highly stigmatized in the working world.
  • Methadone can cause unwanted and sometimes intolerable side effects like weight gain and irritability.
  • Methadone also shows up in urine drug testing for employment, so a person in a methadone maintenance program may have to disclose this before getting a job.

Some people stay on methadone maintenance programs for decades, some forever.

Source:

http://www.cdc.gov/idu/facts/methadonefin.pdf

 

Roxy Addicts Are Now Using Heroin

Roxies and Heroin

Roxy Addicts Are Now Using Heroin

It is no secret that prescription drug abuse has reached epidemic levels in the United States. News of rising overdose rates, “pill mills” prescribing opioid painkillers in return for cash, and a flourishing market for prescription painkillers both online and on the streets has prompted lawmakers to crack down. From busting doctors who overprescribe to creating new laws that target pharmacists, the new laws have made painkillers much harder to find for the average addict.

Unfortunately, roxy addicts are now using heroin. For one, heroin is cheaper. Roxies can cost upwards of 30 dollars a piece on the street, while heroin costs 3 to 10 dollars a bag. For another, heroin is much easier to get.

It makes sense that Roxy addicts are now using heroin. Roxies (oxycodone) are pretty much just a synthetic form of heroin. They are in the same class of drugs: opioids and they have the same effect. This has created a whole new class of heroin addicts.

At one time, heroin use was confined to the inner cities. Since Roxy addicts are now using heroin, lawmakers report that upper middle class kids in their teens and twenties are getting, using, and selling heroin in suburbs and rural areas of the United States.  Former Chicago Police Capt. John Roberts told NBC news that “Kids in the city know not to touch it, but the message never got out to the suburbs.” Indeed, as heroin drug doesn’t seem to have the same stigma as it once did in the eyes of young people.

The number of teens dying of heroin overdose has skyrocketed. In 1999, 198 people between the ages of 15 and 24 died of a heroin overdose compared to 510 deaths in 2009, the latest year that data was available. The number of teens seeking treatment for heroin addiction rose 80 percent in the same 10 year time frame.

The fact that Roxy addicts are now using heroin is not all that surprising. Laws and punishment may decrease the amount of a certain drug available on the street, but it does nothing to treat the underlying addiction. Most experts agree that the only real way to combat drug abuse is to educate and treat. Making a certain drug more expensive or less available does nothing but prompt users to switch to other, sometimes more potent, drugs.

Drug cartels in Mexico and Columbia are quick to take advantage of the new popularity of heroin. They have begun marketing their drug to middle America. Packets of heroin are now stamped with popular brand names like Chevrolet or Prada, or marketed using blockbuster movies aimed at young people, like the Twilight series. Dealers even give it away for free in the suburbs at first. Once kids become hooked, they begin to sell it to them at a much lower price than any pill.

Unlike roxies, however, the manufacture of heroin is illegal and therefore unregulated. Roxy users are now using heroin, but there is no dose regulation or prevention of other substances to “cut” heroin, so many accidentally overdose.

http://abcnews.go.com/WN/heroin-suburbs-rise/story?id=10230269#.T-HxXtmcB8E

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/heroin-soars-suburban-teens-talk-heroin-problem-talking-prescription-drug-problem-article-1.1099140

Attention Deficit Disorder and Addiction

Attention Deficit Disorder and Addiction

Attention Deficit Disorder and Addiction

There are multiple reasons why someone might begin engaging in an addiction. Some people use alcohol or drugs as a way to escape their reality or the difficulties they are facing in life and some people use drugs and alcohol as a means to self-medicate a mental or physical health disorder. Those who have attention deficit disorder as a child have a tendency to develop an addiction later on in life as they get older. They may initially find drug abuse or drinking alcohol is a fun activity but it eventually leads down the darkened road of addiction.

Attention deficit disorder is a condition that is diagnosed, most commonly, during childhood. ADD or attention deficit disorder involves problems with not being able to pay attention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. A child can have one or all of those symptoms. Attention deficit disorder is described as a developmental disorder because it can slow down the development of some children. Symptoms of attention deficit disorder usually become apparent around the age of seven.

People with attention deficit disorder are prone to have an addiction for multiple different reasons. In fact alcoholics are ten times more likely to have attention deficit disorder than non-alcoholics. One of the many reasons why people with attention deficit disorder are more likely to develop an addiction is impulsivity which is a classic characteristic of addictive behaviors too. People with attention deficit disorder fail to fully consider the repercussions of the actions that they take. This means that they are also more willing to not think about the repercussions of trying drugs and drinking because they are not thinking of the long-term consequences of the behavior. People who are dealing with attention deficit disorder also tend to have a lot of life problems which alcohol and drugs may take away or offer a means of escape from.

The treatment for attention deficit disorder could also lead to addiction. A common way of treating attention deficit disorder is with stimulant drugs such as Ritalin and Adderall. There has been and even more so now a concern that, that type of central nervous system stimulant could increase the likelihood of having an addiction. Which makes sense because even Ritalin has been described as a poor man’s cocaine. The abuse of medications for attention deficit disorder is on the rise and can very certainly lead to an addiction. In the prescribed doses though, medication for attention deficit disorder is unlikely to lead to addiction and can be helpful for those suffering from ADD.

In order for those people with attention deficit disorder and addiction to recover both have to be treated. This treatment is usually done in a drug treatment center that specializes in dual diagnosis. In order for people with a dual diagnosis to build a successful life in recovery they will often need to take medication for their attention deficit disorder and most likely a dual diagnosis drug treatment program can find alternatives to the stimulants they were on that are not as addictive. It is absolutely imperative though that someone with attention deficit disorder and addiction treat both at the same time because they do work simultaneously together, if not, it could make it hard to stay sober and happy.

Source: www.add-and-addiction.com

 

Addiction, Dependence and Tolerance

Addiction, Dependence and Tolerance

Addiction, Dependence and Tolerance

Addiction, dependence and tolerance all go hand in hand with one another. Tolerance is the beginning of dependence and dependence is the beginning of addiction. The way to know if you are on the road to an addiction is if you are beginning to build a tolerance and then dependence. Addiction, dependence, and tolerance always come together.

So what is tolerance?

The development of a tolerance is not yet an addiction although it is a precursor. When drugs such as heroin or cocaine are used again and again over time a tolerance begins to develop. Tolerance happens when a person no longer responds to a drug the way that they did initially. Tolerance means that the person has to take a higher dose of the drug to achieve the same effects as they did when they began using it. For example, if someone is using heroin they may only need a tenth of a gram to get high initially but after using it again and again they now need to use half a gram of heroin to achieve the affects they did when they first used it and only needed a tenth of a gram.

What is dependence?

Dependence usually comes along with the build-up of a tolerance or as a drug user is building a tolerance. Dependence means that person needs a drug to function normally. If a dependence to drugs or alcohol has developed usually the drug user, if they abruptly stop using the drugs or alcohol will experience withdrawal symptoms. A drug user is becoming dependent on a substance when they start building a tolerance. A person can have a dependence on a substance without having an addiction. For instance, certain prescription drugs can cause physical dependence but the person is not addicted.

What is addiction?

Addiction is usually the combination of dependence and a tolerance that has taken on new heights. Addiction usually is the use of a substance regardless of negative consequences. The literal definition goes on to use the word enslaved to a substance or action that usually causes severe trauma. Addiction is also a brain disease due to drugs changing the way the brain works. Addiction is not simply a weakness and can affect anyone. Addiction can cause a drug or substance to fill every moment of a person’s life and replaces everything that the person used to enjoy. A person who has an addiction will do almost anything to get their substance such as lie, cheat, steal, and hurt people in order to keep taking the drug. Usually those with an addiction continue to use despite problems with their family, at their job, in school, and even legal issues. A person with an addiction can never not have an addiction. Someone with an addiction is never cured because there is always the chance of relapse but they can recover by abstaining from use and changing their behavior. This is extremely hard to do for someone with an addiction without the help of drug alcohol treatment.